Category Archives: Costume Design

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

The appointment of Manish Arora as creative director at Paco Rabanne has resulted in the delightful reinterpretation of the designer’s ubiquitous chain mail dresses. Digging through the archives, Arora translates Paco Rabane’s vision for the 21st century using innovative technologies.

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Unlike Rabanne’s dresses from the 1960s that were boxy and geometric in nature, Arora’s gowns are crafted to “fit like a glove” using a digital body scan.

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

The plastic and metal palettes used in Rabane’s dresses were identical resulting in  a square silhouette. In contrast, no single square is the same shape as the next in Arora’s version thanks to modeling technologies.

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

The results are sensual garments that drape beautifully on the body, appearing more like a second skin rather than protective armor.

Arora’s creative use of technology coupled with his intense craftsmanship ( a few of the dresses took  25 people and 20 days to make) seems to be in spirit of Paco Rabanne’s forward-looking vision.

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

Fashion Icon Paco Rabanne Restyled Fashion for the 21 Century

 I’m already looking forward to next season and wishing I could afford just one slinky dress!

Source: Fashiontech.com

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Filed under Business, Celebrity, Costume Design, Design, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Show, Haute Couture, New Product Marketing, Paco Rabanne, Production Pattern Maker, Technical Designer

Emerging Fashion Trends 2011 – New England’s Biggest Fashion Show, Boston Fashion Week on the Map for Innovative Fashion Shows and Fashion Designs

Boston Fashion Week

Boston Fashion Week

The 2011 Emerging Trends, a unique fashion event committed to advancing the fashion industry’s exceptional emerging designers, will be held in Boston, MA on September 24th, 2011. This event is a dedicated effort to aid the Boston fashion community in developing its reputation known for innovation and creativity.
Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

The 2008, 2009, and 2010 Emerging Trends events demonstrated great success for participating designers and sponsors including former Project Runway contestants Jerry Tam, Maya Luz and Keith Lissner (The Fashion Show, Bravo TV). Expecting to generate 500+ attendees, we hope to further our achievements for the 2011 event. This event is an incredible opportunity for emerging designers from all over the world to showcase their designs to a variety of sponsors, buyers, press and media, as well as gain extensive exposure on the east coast.

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

The SYNERGY Events aims to provide a vehicle for promising designers to reveal their collections to an upscale audience. Attendees consist of community members interested in developing Boston Fashion Week on a larger scale, as seen in other cities such as New York and Los Angeles.

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Orental

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Oriental

Calling all fashion designers in the northeast: Boston Fashion Week is looking for a headlining designer for this year’s fourth annual Emerging Trends 2011 show. According to organizers, this event is a dedicated effort to help Boston’s fashion community develop a reputation for innovation and creativity.

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Fashion bloggers have remarked that Boston’s show in the past has been particularly helpful for getting emerging designers off the ground, offering a place for them to network and present their work to fashion industry leaders. They expect well over 500 people this year.

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Organizers of the event are looking for a headlining designer with a full line of 15 looks, and are also looking for accessory designers to collaborate with. According to their website, the starting runway package will cost you $1250 and booths are priced at $750. The runway package fee includes models, hair, makeup, video footage, and photography.

Boston Fashion Week Show

Boston Fashion Week Show

Interested in purchasing a ticket for the event, which is slated for 8pm on September 24th? Keep checking in on the Boston Fashion Week 2011 website, where ticket will be available for purchase.

You can check out some videos from previous Emerging Trends Shows below in 2010:

The Emerging Trends Fashion Show

Maria Hamilton’s and Crystal Noe (Collaborator/clothing Designer) at the Emerging Trends Fashion Show 2010 at the Park Plaza Castle in Boston, MA – created at http://animoto.com
Boston Fashion Week 2010 –  Shows & Interviews
 The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show at Boston Fashion Week
The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 1)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 2)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Rising Designs at Boston Fashion Week 2010
Boston Fashion Week 2010

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Copenhagen Summer 2011 Fashion Week, Fashion Festival and the Fashionable Green Fashion Walk

Copenhagen Fashion Week LogoCopenhagen Fashion Week

COPENHAGEN FASHION WEEK
Copenhagen Fashion Week has during the past few years developed into a large and renowned event with an international scope. Copenhagen is twice a year dressed in fashion, focusing on the industry, the press and buyers, but parts of the fashion week is now available to fashion interested consumers.

Copenhagen Fashion Week Catwalk

Copenhagen Fashion Week Catwalk

COPENHAGEN FASHION FESTIVAL
Copenhagen Fashion Week presents Copenhagen Fashion Festival in cooperation with Wonderful Copenhagen and Copenhagen City Centre parallel to the fashion week. Copenhagen Fashion Festival invites everyone to fashion week, when large parts of Copenhagen is transformed into a fashion Mecca of trendshows, exhibitions, miniconcerts, streetparties, exclusive designer clearance sales and parties.
Copenhagen Fashion Week Festival Logo

Copenhagen Fashion Week Festival

The festival begins on Wednesday and this coming August you can join the activities from Wednesday, August 3 – Sunday, August 7, 2011.
Check out the online event  schedule and stay updated on all the different activities during Copenhagen Fashion Festival.
Click on the event in the schedule and you will find information on where and how to participate – so stay tuned!
We wish you a fashionable week!
Green Fashion Eco Initiative

Green Fashion Eco Initiative

THE GREEN WALK
Kermit the Frog once said it wasn’t easy being green. He obviously hadn’t seen our guide to Copenhagen’s best options for sustainable fashion shopping. Do the right thing and shop the ethically responsible way – from organic materials to the welfare of factory workers, Copenhagen Fashion Festival is putting the spotlight on shops, which carry at least one label with a sustainable profile.
Copenhagen Fashion Week Pink Longest Outside Catwalk

Copenhagen Fashion Week Pink Longest Outside Catwalk

HAPPY RESPONSIBLE SHOPPING!
“It has to be easier for the consumers to show consideration for the environment. We need the clothing stores to use the labels of environment. The Nordic Ecolabel is an excellent example of how stores and distributers implement environmental initiatives in their production and sale. At the same time I urge consumers to buy clothes which are labeled with either the Nordic Ecolabel or the European Ecolabel.
” Karen Ellemann, Minister of the Environment
Copenhagen Fashion Week Pink Longest Outside Catwalk

Copenhagen Fashion Week Pink Longest Outside Catwalk

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All About Fashion Design (Part 1) – Fashion Design, Fashion Structure and Fashion History

Fashion design

Fashion design is the art of the application of design and aesthetics or natural beauty to clothing and accessories. Fashion design is influenced by cultural and social lattitudes, and has varied over time and place. Fashion designers work in a number of ways in designing clothing and accessories. Some work alone or as part of a team. They attempt to satisfy consumer desire for aesthetically designed clothing; and, because of the time required to bring a garment onto the market, must at times anticipate changing consumer tastes.

Fashion designers attempt to design clothes which are functional as well as aesthetically pleasing. They must consider who is likely to wear a garment and the situations in which it will be worn. They have a wide range and combinations of materials to work with and a wide range of colors, patterns and styles to choose from. Though most clothing worn for everyday wear fall within a narrow range of conventional styles, unusual garments are usually sought for special occasions, such as evening wear or party dresses.

Some clothes are made specifically for an individual, as in the case of haute couture. Today, most clothing is designed for the mass market, especially casual and every-day wear.

Fashion designers can work in a number of ways. Fashion designers may work full-time for one fashion company, known as ‘in-house designers’ which owns the designs. They may work alone or as part of a team. Freelance designers work for themselves, selling their designs to fashion houses, directly to shops, or to clothing manufacturers. The garments bear the buyer’s label. Some fashion designers set up their own labels, under which their designs are marketed. Some fashion designers are self-employed and design for individual clients. Other high-fashion designers cater to specialty stores or high-fashion department stores. These designers create original garments, as well as those that follow established fashion trends. Most fashion designers, however, work for apparel manufacturers, creating designs of men’s, women’s, and children’s fashions for the mass market. Large designer brands which have a ‘name’ as their brand such as Calvin Klein, Gucci, or Chanel are likely to be designed by a team of individual designers under the direction of a designer director.

Structure

Designing a garment

Fashion designers work in different ways.Myriam Chalek, Owner of Creative Business House states it in Vogue Magazine: Each fashion designer is unique hence the uniqueness of the sample’s development. Nevertheless the mainstream is pretty similar: From a sketch to a sophisticated illustrated CAD design, fashion designers before using any fabric put their ideas on paper. It’s only once they have the concept of the wanted design that they will use fabric. Myriam Chalek explains that the first steps of the garment production are very important: once the designer is in sync with whats in his head and whats on paper, he will either create a muslin prototype of the sample and once satisfied he will have the pattern done and then the final sample. Or he will create a pattern and then work directly with the fabric to produce the sample. This second method is usually not recommended if the designer is going to modify the sample as it is being created in so far as the fabric can be wasted and the final sample not being the true representation of the original designer’s concept. The pattern production is the most crucial part of the garment’s production because job the fit of the finished garment/sample depends on the pattern’s accuracy. Samples have to be perfect because that’s what the fashion designer present to potential buyers.

History

Fashion design is generally considered to have started in the 19th century with Charles Frederick Worth who was the first designer to have his label sewn into the garments that he created. Before the former draper set up his maison couture (fashion house) in Paris, clothing design and creation was handled by largely anonymous seamstresses, and high fashion descended from that worn at royal courts. Worth’s success was such that he was able to dictate to his customers what they should wear, instead of following their lead as earlier dressmakers had done. The term couturier was in fact first created in order to describe him. While all articles of clothing from any time period are studied by academics as costume design, only clothing created after 1858 could be considered as fashion design.

It was during this period that many design houses began to hire artists to sketch or paint designs for garments. The images were shown to clients, which was much cheaper than producing an actual sample garment in the workroom. If the client liked their design, they ordered it and the resulting garment made money for the house. Thus, the tradition of designers sketching out garment designs instead of presenting completed garments on models to customers began as an economy.

READ ALSO:

ALL ABOUT FASHION (PART 2) – TYPES OF FASHION, INCOME, SCHOOLS

ALL ABOUT FASHION (PART 3) – FASHION STAR SYSTEMS, WORLD FASHION AND THE GLOBAL FASHION INDUSTRY

Source: Wikipedia.com

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Dressing with Sense and Simplicity: Organic Fabric and Clothing

No one would like to eat a bowl of pesticides drenched food. Then why wear clothing doused in chemicals?

Centuries before people use to live in harmony with nature and believed in giving even better environment for their coming generations. Now, people have crossed all limits dominated by the voracity of luxuries, benefits and money. This is taking a serious toll on the environment, and on the lives of all living beings in the planet.

The ‘Chemical Cocktail’ of Clothing:

When considering a healthy lifestyle, fabric is the first thing that comes to mind. Synthetic fabrics’ teeming with chemicals and dyes pose severe health threats. Synthetic fibers makes the skin uncomfortable due to the presence of toxins in them. From towels to bed linens, and clothes they are all-pervading in our everyday life. Apart from the potential health hazards to humans, these synthetic fibers also leach into the environment causing serious damages to soil, air, ground water, and other living beings around us.

The Environment Shield Organization of US has declared that seven out of the top fifteen pesticides are used for growing conventional cotton, and are regarded as the most environment polluting pesticides. On the contrary, organic cotton is cultivated using untreated GMO seeds, and by adopting biological based growing practices. A beneficial habitat planting method is adopted which prevents pests, thereby eliminating the usage of toxic chemicals.

stewartbrown 02 Room101 | Organic Fashion Design Pioneer Howard Brown

Natural Dyes Vs Synthetic Dyes:

Synthetic dyes involve many carcinogenic chemicals and effluents that are discharged into the river or atmosphere causing pollution. Chemicals used on fabrics can contain allergens, carcinogens and mutagens. Dyes that are used for special effects on textiles such as flame retardant, stain resistant etc., are likely to create health problems. Natural dyes are obtained from renewable sources, and are good to skin. They are bio-degradable and eco-friendly. Natural dyes are enriched with medicinal and curative properties, and impart healing qualities to the wearer of the fabric dyed with them. They save energy as they are not made from petroleum products. Furthermore, they provide rural employment, and also preserve traditional craftsmanship.

Life with natural fibers’:

Acrylic, polyester, nylon, rayon, triacetate, acetate and other fabrics labeled as stain & wrinkle resistant, and moth repellent will have ample amount of chemicals in their making. These fabrics can be avoided, and replaced with natural fabrics like wool, silk, cotton, linen, cashmere, and hemp. Organic and herbal clothing is more preferable for people who are very sensitive to chemicals. Researches on people with multiple chemical sensitivities reveal that organic clothing is essential in reducing their exposure to toxic chemicals.

 

Source: fibre2fashion.com

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People are STRANGE! Fashion Model Bonnie Strange’s Fashionable Fashion Photography!!

LITTLE MISS BONNE STRANGE!

German born International Fashion Model, Stylist and Photographer Bonnie Strange shows up some of her work in her ever growing Album ‘PEOPLE ARE STRANGE’.

HEROINE!

CHOCOLATE LOVE!

LOVE OBSESSION!

MACHINE

HUMAN HEART!

MILK ME!

BLUE TANGO!

LOVE ROCKS!

SUMMER LOVE

STRANGELOVE.

TOUGH LOVE!


Image Source: BonnieStrangePhotography

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12 Must-Know Menswear Designers Behind Luxury Labels

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A round-up of 12 must-know designers behind luxury menswear, including Véronique Nichanian for Hermès, Italo Zucchelli for Calvin Klein & Martyn Bal for Versace.

With all the constant publicity surrounding designers of luxury womenswear, one could be forgiven for assuming Alber Elbaz, Marc Jacobs and John Galliano are the be-all and end-all of LanvinLouis Vuitton and Dior respectively. Whilst they give consumers a tangible face and voice to a brand, it is often the case that there is an alternate independent talent behind the men that grace the runways of Paris, Milan, London and New York.

Although some menswear designers do make the headlines, Thom Browne for Moncler Gamme Bleu, Kris Van Assche for Dior Homme and Raf Simons for Jil Sander, many other creators of influential and popular luxury menswear brands have yet to seep into the consumers’ consciousness. We investigated the menswear designers behind the recent Autumn Winter 2011 collections and present a roster of names you need to know.

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Lucas Ossendrijver, Lanvin

Netherlands native, Lucas Ossendrijver, has been the man behind Lanvin’s menswear collections since 2005. After graduating from Holland’s Fashion Institute Arnhem he went straight to work at Kenzo, then onto Kostas Murkudis. In 2001 he joined Dior Homme under the direction of Hedi Slimane, eventually being selected by Alber Ebaz four years later to head up Menswear at Lanvin.

“When I was a student I once found a hand-stitched men’s jacket at a flea market. I unpicked the lining to look inside, and I was amazed to find a panoply of hidden trims, reinforcements and ribbons. I didn’t understand it, but that’s what drew me to men’s fashion. The construction of men’s clothing is concealed, but it is very precise. That’s what attracted me.”

Website: Lanvin
Quote: Portrait Lucas Ossendrijver

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Véronique Nichanian, Hermès

In a world of male designers dressing women, Véronique Nichanian is one of the few females designing for men. Whilst the famed French heritage brand might be more commonly associated with Martin Margiela, John Paul Gaultier or more recently, Christophe Lemaire, Nichanian has been with Hermès for over twenty years, joining in 1988. The designer graduated from the Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, followed by a period working for Cerruti before joining Hermès. Her very first collection for Hermes won her the City of Paris Grand Prix of Creative Art prize.

“I am lucky to have been able to use the most exceptional materials for Hermes, it is essential for me to work with the know-how of traditional craftsmanship, combined with the latest technological advances.”

Website: Hermès
Quote: Pursuitist

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Alessandro Sartori, Z Zegna

Italian Alessandro Sartori originally studied textile engineering in his hometown Biella, Northern Italy, before going on to study Fashion in Milan. He has been with the Zegna group since 1993, originally as the design director of the Linea Soft line. When the Z Zegna brand was created in 2003, to target a younger, more modern consumer, Sartori was appointed creative director, where he remains today.

“Fashion changes while style remains; this is the backbone of how I live my professional and personal life. It’s important to always be modern, and stand out and to evolve but superficial and ephemeral trends should never be followed. It’s most important that a man always feels comfortable in what he is wearing; Clothes should be worn, and not the other way around”.

Website: Z Zegna
Quote: Fashion We Like

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Graeme Fidler and Michael Herz, Bally

The pair originally met in 2003 while working at Aquascutum where Herz was head of womenswear since and Fidler head of menswear. Previously Herz worked in New York for Ralph Lauren, helping establish the RLX line, Fidler worked with Marc Jacobs at Iceberg and eventually in Paris at Guy Laroche, working under the direction of Alber Elbaz. They moved across to Bally following the departure of Brian Atwood, to re-invigorate the ready-to-wear business started in the late 1970’s.

“We largely see ourselves as editors whose job is to challenge each other’s ideas and design concepts. Our aim is to create a different mood for Bally by unifying and evolving the brand with contemporary, relevant collections. What we love about fashion design is the opportunity to continually break rules, to create and reinvent, over and over.”

Website: Bally
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Kean Etro, Etro

Originally beginning as a textile house in 1968, the focus on Etro has always been superb fabrics in intricate prints. The family owned and run business is designed by sister and brother team Veronica and Kean Etro, where Kean heads up the menswear collection. After finishing his studies in 1990, Kean joined the family business, supervising the launch of the Etro perfume line and eventually becoming the manager of the men’s fashion collection, where he has remained since.

“It’s very important if you can relate to what you wear, to me, creativity is not just making a collection. You have to invent something every time.”

Website: Etro
Quote: Digital Journal

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Martyn Bal, Versace

Immediately after completing his MA at London’s Royal College of Art in 2000, Martyn Bal was instantly recruited to assist Hedi Slimane at Dior Homme. He followed his tenure at Dior with stints as creative director and design consultant at Verri Uomo and Versace respectively before being hired by Burberry as menswear design director of the Prorsum label. He has now returned to Versace, as head of Menswear and continues to manage his own line, Martyn Bal.

“I intend to have a graphic and constructivists approach to my design, but always want to inject enough energy through movement and fluidity to give it the softness and emotion it needs for it to become pure, poetic and believable.”

Website: Versace
Quote: Dazed Digital

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Milan Vukmirovic, Trussardi 1911

To say that Milan Vukmirovic is a man of many talents is an understatement. Not only is he the Creative Director of Trussardi 1911, but he is also the director of magazines L’Officiel Homme and L’Officiel Homme Italia. Further to these roles he is an accomplished photographer who has shot campaigns for Armani, Hugo Boss, Lacoste and Trussardi, he was a co-founder of Colette concept store in Paris and recently co-founded The Webster in Miami, a retail project focused on fusing fashion, photography and design.

“Everyone knows everything about a product right away, they know the marketing and they know how it works. So I think at the moment, the important thing is for something to have a soul—a real emotion. If you make something personal, that’s what makes the difference. You have to make people feel things. That’s what I do in my work.”

Website: Trussardi
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Paul Helbers, Louis Vuitton

Whilst creative director Marc Jacobs has become synonymous with Louis Vuitton’sready-to-wear collections, it is Paul Helbers who is the director and designer of the men’s studio. Helbers studied fashion at the Rietveld academy in Amsterdam before moving to London to do graduate work at the Royal College of Art. Upon returning to Holland he worked for mass-market chain Mac & Maggie, quickly branching off to start his own label Inch and consulting for men’s-wear companies. He eventually landed a post at Maison Martin Margiela, where he stayed for almost five years as the men’s studio director, before moving to Louis Vuitton in 2005.

“Men are not like women, who will buy a great-looking shoe even if it kills them, Men are extreme creatures of comfort, so quality and fit are absolutely essential. As soon as a man feels restricted in a jacket, you lose him as a client.”

Website: Louis Vuitton
Quote: The New York Times

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Italo Zucchelli, Calvin Klein

Italian designer, Italo Zucchelli, graduated from the Polimoda school of fashion design in Florence, eventually working at Jil Sander and as a designer for Romeo Gigli. In 2000 he moved to Calvin Klein, where he had originally planned to leave only one year in. Calvin Klein himself took him aside and asked him to stay: “He told me that he really liked what I was doing and that he wanted me to go on doing it.” In 2004 he was tapped to direct and design the menswear offering.

“The rules of the game in general are going to change for everything, not just menswear. People want to have fun with clothes. We sold out of the mirror suits in New York, and the black suits were still there. It tells me that men are looking for something that makes them feel good, makes them have fun, and makes them stand out. And it’s all different sorts of men.”

Website: Calvin Klein
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Massimiliano Giornetti, Salvatore Ferragamo

He began his career at Ferragamo as an assistant men’s knitwear designer, ten years later he is the creative director of all the Salvatore Ferragamo collections. He studied Foreign Languages and Literature at the University of Florence, before turning his hand to fashion at the Polimoda Institute of Fashion Design and Marketing.

‘‘I don’t believe in fashion as provocation. I’m not interested in the ‘wow’ effect, I’m more concerned with beauty and decoration. Fashion is not a primary necessity in life. The point of fashion is to make your daily life more special.’’

Website: Salvatore Ferragamo
Quote: The New York Times

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Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi , Gianfranco Ferré

Roman Tommaso Aquilano and Bolognese Roberto Rimondi, originally met in 1988 whilst working as designers at Max Mara. In 2005 they won first prize at Italian Vogue’s Who’s On Next contest open to young talents and formed their 6267 label shortly after. In 2007 they became creative directors of Italian cashmere brand Malo, then owned by IT Holding SpA that also controlled Gianfranco Ferré. When Lars Nilsson’s resigned in early 2008, the duo were tapped to design in the womenswear, they are now responsible for the creative direction of the whole business.

“The fashion system is also a bit forced, it uses this idea of the “young designer” to look for something else. But you can have a designer who might be 80 years old but who does things that are different. It’s the search for what is different more than for what is “young.”

Website: Gianfranco Ferré
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Paolo Gerani, Iceberg

Originally his parents business, merely one year older than him, Gilmar S.p.A. was created to produce and distribute clothing under the Iceberg and Gerani brands. Paolo originally studied business marketing at Los Angeles University followed by an economics and commerce degree course at Urbino University. He joined the family business and was immediately drawn to the design side, particularly the study and research of trends, fabrics and colours. He devoted his time to advertising and corporate communication, before eventually becoming vice-chairman and creative director.

“I want to respect the knitwear heritage of the brand, which is what we historically produce. Knitwear is our fabric.”

Website: Iceberg
Quote: Dazed Digital

Source: Luxurysociety.com by Sophie Doran

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 8 ) – Look Good on Paper

Writing a Resume and Cover Letter That Will Get You in the Door


The resume is your marketing tool that will sell employers on the idea of interviewing you. Even if you’re an ideal candidate for the position, if you don’t look good on paper, recruiters won’t give you a second glance. Not only do your skills and qualifications have to impress, but you need to make sure they stand out amongst the hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of other resumes that companies will receive for the same position. Keep reading to find out how to create a well organized, intelligent resume that will get you through the door!

What They Want to Know

Your resume should include the following information:

  • Contact info: Basic information about yourself that also serves as your header. Include: Name, Address, Phone, and Email
  • Objective: A brief statement (one or two sentences) describing the position you are seeking and how you hope to contribute to an employer.
  • Education: Name of school, Years attended, Concentration, Degree received, GPA (if above 3.0)
  • Qualifications/Skills: An itemized list describing relevant abilities such as knowledge of computer programs, languages, etc.
  • Work Experience: chronological list of previous employers, starting with the most recent. Include position held, duration, and important responsibilities/accomplishments.
  • Honors and Awards: List any honors and awards and year received.
  • Course Highlights/Relevant Activities: If you have limited work experience, list course highlights, or relevant extracurricular activities, clubs, or organizations you may have participated in.

There are tons of resume creating resources and examples out there, many of which can be misleading and inaccurate. If you choose to seek more examples, make sure you select a reputable source. Click on the resume sample link below to see our example of a well formatted, clearly organized resume.

What They Don’t Want to See

Knowing what not to include can be just as important as knowing what to include. When listing work responsibilities, don’t over exaggerate – a professional recruiter can see right through an unrealistic resume. Also avoid making general statements- if you can, always list specifics to support your qualifications. For example, instead of citing “designed collection of dresses”, state “designed and illustrated 5 piece dress collection for Fall 2007 collection”. Giving specifics adds individuality and gives the recruiter better insight into your achievements.

When listing job responsibilities, it’s a good idea to use action verbs to add variety to your statements. Write Express has a good variety of action verbs to choose from. And then of course are the basic resume no-no’s: any personal info like age, religion, race, and salary requirements have no business in your resume.

Formatting

There are of course many different ways to format your resume, but keep in mind that your resume has only a few seconds to grad the recruiter’s attention so if it’s not easy to follow, you won’t stand a chance! As an entry-level candidate or even after a few years of experience, your resume should not exceed one page. Recruiters won’t care what high school you went to (unless it was industry specific), or what your hobbies are, so keeping your content concise and relevant to the desired position is a good way to maintain a reasonable length.

Just because your resume is clean and organized, doesn’t mean you can’t get a little creative with it. Experimenting with different fonts and coloring for your headers is one way to make your resume stand out amongst a sea of black and white. If your field is eveningwear, using a delicate script for your headers can be a great accent. Just remember to keep it simple- the fonts should still be legible and should support, not detract from your resume.

Presentation

While you will probably use Microsoft Word or a similar word processing program to create your resume, if your resume is going to be emailed, you should convert the file to PDF. When printing your resume, select a professional presentation paper. Your local stationery or office supply store has tons to choose from. Once again, paper choice should not detract from the content of your resume or affect its appearance if your resume is faxed or photocopied.

Cover Letter

Anytime you fax or email your resume, it should be accompanied by a cover letter. The first thing that recruiter reads, the contents of your cover letter should serve as an introduction and offers an opportunity to talk briefly about your background and knowledge of the company. You should definitely invest the time to make your cover letter well-written and well-focused. A poorly written, vague cover letter is a surefire way to get your resume overlooked.

Without repeating the details of your resume, introduce yourself to your prospective employer in three or four concise paragraphs including the following points:

  • Why you are writing / the position of interest
  • What you have to offer the company (accomplishments, work ethic etc)
  • Your knowledge, enthusiasm and reasons for interest in the company
  • Request an interview and specify how you will follow up

Keep in mind that the desired outcome of the cover letter is for the recruiter to take action so it should be tailored specifically to the company you’re applying to instead of for a general position. Use your company research (you did research the company right?) and draw upon your knowledge of what they usually look for in successful employees to demonstrate how you can be an asset to their organization.

A quick word about following up: do it! I cannot tell you how many interviews I’ve received because I followed up after sending my resume. Not only does it demonstrate your follow up skills (very important) but it emphasizes your interest in the position. In one instance, a recruiter told me that from over 300 resumes he received, he contacted me for an interview because I was one of a handful of people who actually followed up. A handful (out of 300+) sounds like a pretty good way to make yourself stand out!

Once you’ve prepared your resume and cover letter, proofread them more than once to catch any mistakes or irrelevant information. Have a friend take a look to catch any mistakes you might have missed. When you’ve finished your resume, you’re ready to begin applying for positions! Remember that even after you’re hired, your resume should grow along with you. Keep it constantly updated as you gain experience and skills and when it’s time for you to look for another position, you’ll be glad you spent the time on it along the way.

Source: Designernexus.com

 

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 7 ) – Setting the Course

Decide Where You Want to Go and Develop an Action Plan to Get There

So you want to be a fashion designer, right? You might be applying to different fashion schools, already in school, about to graduate, or maybe you already have your first job in the industry. No matter which stage you’re at, it’s important to have an idea of where you ultimately want to end up. If you’ve read the previous “Break it Down” article, then you’re aware of the different categories and specializations within the fashion industry. Have you thought about which fashion market you want to end up in? What specialization? With so many different options, how do you know which one to choose? In this segment, we’ll walk you through the process of weighing your options, setting career goals, and developing a plan of action to increase your chances of reaching them.

Know Yourself

Before you can plan where you want to go, you need to figure out where you are. Getting a clear picture of who you are will clarify what will make you happy and fulfilled in your career, and in life. Here are a few things to ask yourself:

  • Preferences: What do you like to do?
  • Skills: What do you do well?
  • How do your personal desires fit into the picture?
  • How much do you value creating a balance between work and your family and friends?
  • Do you prefer a small or large company setting?
  • What are your work values, and how important is it that your employer shares these values?
  • What’s your ideal work environment?

Career assessments are great tools that will cover the above questions and more to help you identify and organize your qualities and preferences. Assessments can easily be found at your school’s career/guidance office, career agencies, and of course via Internet sites such as www.assessment.com.

Do Your Homework

Once you have a better idea of your skills, interests, traits, and desires, you can begin selecting career choices that fit you best, and weeding out the ones that don’t. Take another look at our “Break it Down” article, and using the results of your assessment, decide what design market is the most appealing to you. Select a category that interests you, such as menswear, womenswear, sportswear, or intimate apparel. Then break it down by specialization. Would you prefer to work with wovens, knits, tops, dresses, bottoms…? You may find a few that interest you- and that’s ok because the next step is to do your homework and research your chosen markets and specializations.

Make a list of companies within your chosen market and research them as well. Your objective is to educate yourself as much as possible in these areas so you can make an intelligent decision regarding career choice. As you learn more about your chosen paths, you may discover that you had unrealistic expectations and your needs and wants may change. Informational interviews can be a helpful way to gain insight into a particular category/company of interest. Informational interviews will be discussed in more detail in our “Preparation is Key” article (coming soon).

Define Your Goals

After assessing yourself and exploring your career options, the next step is to set career goals for what you hope to accomplish. Defining your goals will help you take the right steps to reach your ideal career. Keep in mind that your goals may change at anytime. In fact- as you reach your initial goals and continue to grow and develop personally and professionally, setting new goals will be essential. It is important to constantly motivate yourself- keep learning and striving for satisfaction. Remember, the world changes quickly and so do you!

Set the Course

To set your career plan in motion, you will need to follow through with the goals you’ve set. Break each goal into manageable “chunks.” Each week/month tackle a step or two. For example, if one of your first goals is to get a position as an entry-level designer for a better sportswear company, your calendar may look like this:

  • Week 1: Research moderate companies
  • Week 2: Prepare portfolio
  • Week 3: Prepare resume and cover letters
  • Week 4: Prepare interview responses and wardrobe
  • Week 5: Apply for positions

Breaking your goals into smaller tasks will help them seem more feasible, and by completing each task one by one, you’ll reach your goal faster than you thought!

When your job matches your interests and your personality, you are more likely to be happy and successful in your work. Having a plan of action and being prepared doesn’t mean that you’ll get that dream position immediately after graduation. But your classwork, job search, market research, etc. will all be focused in the direction that will get you there one day!

Mialn Fashion Campus

Source: Designernexus.com

 

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 6 ) – Well Put Together

What to Include in Your Fashion Portfolio

What’s the most common faux pas when it comes to fashion design portfolios? Many fashion design students and entry-level apparel designers make the mistake of filling their fashion portfolios with all of their favorite fashion illustrations, or photos of garments they’ve made.
The trouble with this is that apparel industry companies don’t need to see tons of imaginative avant-garde fashion sketches – who’s really going to wear that stuff? They just don’t sell! Don’t get me wrong, you should still show off some fashion figure illustrations and your ability to develop an apparel design collection, but following an organized presentation format is a much better approach to showing off your fashion design talents and skills.

Choose Your Dream Market

First thing’s first: decide in which market you want to have your fashion career, and make a list of fashion industry companies that fit into that category. For example, if you would love to be a fashion designer for a better sportswear collection such as Bebe, other fashion companies on your list could include Armani Exchange, Anthropology, and DKNY. Then take some time to look into the companies you chose. What’s their design philosophy? Who is their customer? Where do they draw inspiration from, and what does their current collection look like?

Once you’re familiar with the type of fashion industry companies you want to design for, think about what they want to see from you – the fashion designer. You’ll need to show that you have an eye for style and can create a cohesive apparel design collection for a specific customer, and the company should be able to identify with the price point and styling of your fashion designs.

Putting It All Together

In addition, most entry level or assistant fashion designers start out sketching computer fashion flats, assembling fashion presentation boards, and preparing apparel tech packs. Show your prospective employers that you’ve got each area covered! Develop a series of 3 to 6 small groups with 6 – 8 fashion figures or complete outfits per group. Start off each design group with an inspiration page: a collage of images, fabric swatches and other findings that help set the mood and introduce the color story for the group. Next come the fashion illustrations, which show fashion figures in various poses wearing your apparel designs. These fashion sketches will demonstrate how garments will look on a fashion body and give you the opportunity to express how you would match up each piece to create coordinated outfits.

 

Following your fashion figure illustrations are flat sketches or floats (stylized flats). A “flat” is basically a black and white sketch of how a garment looks when laid flat. Fashion flats must be clean, correctly proportioned, and include all garment details like: seams, topstitching, buttons and hardware. While some apparel companies still sketch flats by hand, the vast majority creates flat sketches via computer so it is important that you are comfortable using popular CAD software such as Adobe Illustrator for the fashion industry.

Apparel floats are more stylized versions of flat sketches that usually show some kind of movement in the garment. Alternating the use of flats and floats from one fashion design group to another is a good way to add variety to your fashion presentation layout while showing your versatility. Fashion CADs (flat sketches rendered with colors and fabrics) can also be incorporated into a group of your fashion illustrations or flats and can be added as a separate section.

 

And please don’t just display your fashion sketches on a plain white or solid color page! Tie each design group together using fashion backgrounds that follow the theme for each group. Fashion backgrounds are an extra opportunity to show your creativity and fashion presentation skills.

Does Size Really Matter?

In a word: yes! Make sure your fashion design portfolio is a manageable size. Most likely, you’ll be showing your fashion portfolio in an office and need to open it on a small or cluttered desk. Anything larger than 9″ x 12″ is just too large and unnecessary. I remember making my first fashion portfolio 11″ x 17″ (the advice of a college professor, believe it or not). As you can imagine, it was not practical at all – I even recall one interview in a small office where I had to present my apparel design portfolio from my lap!

That being said, by following these guidelines, you’ll be sure to create a kick butt fashion design portfolio that will get your talents noticed and give your fashion career a competitive edge amongst other apparel design candidates!

Source: Designernexus.com

 

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