Category Archives: Sales Representative

Top 10 Networking Tips for Savvy Networkers


  • .  Be Prepared. Savvy Networkers always have their networking tools with them at all times.  The Networking tool kit includes: an ample supply of business cards, your name badge, any collateral material (flyers, brochures, etc), and your marketing message (often referred to as your elevator speech).

    .  Arrive early. Savvy Networkers arrive early and have their business cards readily available and can relax and focus on learning about the other people in the room.  As an early, Savvy Networker, you can pause to calmly gather your thoughts and your intentions so that your time spent networking will be of benefit to you and your goals.  Preparation goes a long way in making you appear to be someone that other people will want to get to know.  People do business with people they like.  And you will be judged by others, like it or not, based on their first impression of you.
  • .  Have a plan. Savvy Networkers always have an idea of what the goal is for each event they attend.  Know, before going in, what the outcome is that you want for yourself or for the people you meet at each event.  Do you want to meet 3 people and focus on getting to know them really well?  Are you looking for an introduction to a certain type of client?  Are you looking for information or connections that will get you that information?  When you have a plan, it is easier to stay focused and achieve your expected outcome.  It also helps you to keep on track to help others in achieving their goals when you remind yourself to be generous with your own knowledge and connections.  And, when you have a plan it is easier to stay on task as you meet with people.
  • Be a Giver and/or a Connector. When you focus on “giving” and being helpful to others, the “getting” will come later … and it will come in unexpected ways.  Foremost to remember, is that no one likes a person with a “taker” mentality.  When you are generous, people will notice and repsect you for your kind nature.  And, people generally do business with people that they respect, trust, and like.  Act like a host at every event you attend by connecting people.  This can be a simple act of intruducing 2 people to each other or as elaborate as giving a testimonial about 1 person and their services to the entire group.  All of these acts allow you to focus on the “other” and grows your social capital in the room.
  • Leave your troubles behind. Put on a happy face at the door and remind yourself that it is “show time”.  This is your time to sparkle and shine.  People will look forward to seeing you and meeting you if you are energetic, positive, and outgoing.  Again, people enjoy doing business with people that they like.  BE a person that others will like.  Hopefully you’ve heard the zen expression “Be the ball” … well, whenever you have the chance, “Be the ball of the ball!”  Do not burden or bore people with your troubles or your problems.  Everyone has enough of their own, and, trust me on this, they do not need or want to hear about yours.
  • Listen with focus. When someone is speaking with you, give that person your entire focus.  LISTEN.  Really hear what the person is saying.  Keep your eyes and ears focused and keep your self talk and thoughts focused too.  The greatest gift that you can give to another person is to truly hear what that person is saying.  You’ve seen this before and it bears repeating: you have 1 mouth and 2 ears for a reason.  Listen twice as much and talk 1/2 as much and everyone you treat this way will think you are a genius!
  • Be Genuine. Everyone knows when someone is “schmoozing” on or at them.  And, no one likes being “primed” for the pump.  Be genuine in your interactions with others at an event.  Again, it comes back to building trust,  to building “brand YOU”.  There is a huge difference between being INTERESTED and in trying to be INTERESTING.   When you are interested in learning about someone and their business entirely for the sake of learning about the other person, you will leave a lasting impression as someone who genuinely cares.  On the other hand, when you are interested only so that you can take what you learn and then use it to make yourself or your products interesting to this person … well, my friend, you have slipped into the category of “scorched earth networking” and it is not a good place to be.
  • Do Teach/Don’t Sell. The Savvy Networker knows that the immediate sale of a product is not the goal in networking.  Networking is about building relationships with people who will be happy to tell others about who you are and what you do.  Word of mouth advertising is the most cost effective and powerful advertising.   At every opportunity, teach others about who you are, as a person, and what it is that you do.  Always present a clear emphasis on the type of client that you are looking for.  In doing this, you will be building a salesforce that can reach far wider than you can on your own.
  • Follow up. After the event, send a thank you card to each person that you had direct contact with.  Mention something from your discussion in the thank you card (it helps if you jot notes on the back of each person’s business card that you collect).  If there is a referral that you can supply to someone you’ve just met, include that in the follow up note.  Showing up and following up are the two most important parts of networking.  Showing up, in most cases, is the easy part.  The follow up is, sadly, the most neglected part of networking.  Since so many people fail to follow up, you can really stand out by just doing this simple act of reaching out to remind someone of who you are and what you do … and that you are interested in exploring a relationship.
  • Follow up some more! Depending on where you look, marketing statistics state that it takes 7 to 12 impressions for a consumer to make a buying decision.  It also take somewhere between 5 to 12 impressions to become “top of mind”.  AND those are the OLD numbers.  Because of the overload of information that we are all faced with every day, the number of impressions is actually quite higher.  It is more likely to take 15 – 20 impressions before you make the connections that you are looking to build! Meeting face to face is the 1st impression.  An email, a phone call, another card, a lunch date … don’t stop after 1 or 2 impressions.  Keep going.  Savvy Networkers know that to build strong relationships they must dig deeper and make the continued effort to build ongoing relationships!

Source: Top10networkingtips.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Branding, Business, Communications Manager, Consumer Psychology, Consumer Psychology, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Interactive Marketing, Management, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Manager, Marketing Mix, Methodology, Networking, Niche Business, Niche Market, PR Manager, Presentation, Promotion, Publicity, Qualitative Research, Research, Sales Representative, Social Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Target Market

Networking Tips: How to Work a Room

Networking can serve as a valuable strategy for getting a lead on a job, gathering information, or catching the special attention of a company recruiter.

Most of us are not born minglers. Practice and preparation will help you develop the skills it takes to be effective at an Employer Info Session, a Career Fair, or other serendipitous opportunities. As difficult or awkward as it may feel at first, the ability to meet and make a positive, professional impression on people will become ever more important as your career advances and develops. Here are some tips to get you started.

Check your attitude

Many of us are shy or reluctant to approach strangers in new social situations, so understandably it’s not always easy to muster the energy to try and connect with people at networking events. That’s why it’s key to get mentally geared up before you even show up. Because your attitude often guides your behavior, you must overcome any negative self-talk that could hinder you from reaching out to others. Do these outlooks sound familiar?

  • “Why should I bother trying to impress this person? I’m only one of a hundred students this recruiter is going to see today.”
  • “I don’t think I know enough to engage the company reps in an intelligent conversation.”
  • “I’ve never really been good at meeting people. That’s just my personality.”

Such negative thoughts prevent you from pushing past any social roadblocks standing in your way. The truth is that many, if not most, people have similar thoughts in group situations and are just as hesitant to initiate conversations. But if you change your attitude from negative to positive, you can instead take the lead. Remember:

  • People enjoy talking about themselves. Ask them questions to get them started.
  • People feel flattered when you show an interest in them and their work/organization. And they will reciprocate your demonstrations of sincere interest.
  • You have more to offer others than you might think; just believe it.

Redefine what it means to interact with “strangers”

When you join a new student organization or club, you share certain interests with the members. When you go to a party, you run into people you’ve seen in class or around your dorm. A networking event is not really all that different if you view it as an occasion to find what you have in common with other people there. Commonalities help “strangers” connect more easily.

  • Take the initiative to approach others, introduce yourself, and share a piece of information that could reveal the common thread you share with them.
  • During conversations, listen carefully to discover shared interests or goals.
  • Use your shared background or interests as the basis for sustaining conversations.

Prepare and practice your self-introduction

To avoid being tongue-tied when you try to start a conversation with someone you don’t know, prepare a self-introduction that is clear, interesting, and well delivered. What you say about yourself will depend on the nature of the event, but in any case, it shouldn’t take longer than 8-10 seconds. Although practicing your introduction might at first seem silly and artificial, it will eventually help you make an introduction that sounds natural, confident, and smooth. Here are a few examples:

  • “Hi, my name is Catherine Lee. I’m glad to have this chance to meet you and learn how a psychology major can break into the pharmaceutical industry.” [Employer Information Session]
  • “Good morning, I’m Bryan Sampson, a former summer intern at your Los Angeles branch.” [Career Fair]
  • “Hello, my name is Jessica Garcia. I’m a junior rhetoric major looking to find out what it’s like working in public relations and marketing.” [Career Speed Dating Event]

Risk rejection – it’s not the end of the world

It happens. Some individuals may not respond to your introduction in the way you would like. If that takes place, don’t take it personally and just move on. As long as you maintain an outgoing and friendly attitude, you can plan for continued networking success by:

  • Identifying the goals you want to achieve at the networking event before you go (e.g., to learn more about a career, to develop internship leads, etc.)
  • Keeping a healthy sense of humor.
  • Treating everyone as you would want to be treated. Aside from being the courteous thing to do, you don’t know who might be helpful to you in the future.

And last, but not least, don’t forget how important it is for you to physically move around and about when you’re at a networking event. You can’t work a room when you’re sitting down! So get in there and show them what you’ve got.

Source: Career.berkeley.edu

Leave a comment

Filed under Branding, Business, Business Plan, Communications Manager, Consumer Psychology, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Interactive Marketing, Internet Marketing, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Manager, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Methodology, Networking, Niche Business, Niche Market, PR Manager, Presentation, Promotion, Publicity, Research, Sales Representative, Social Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Target Market

Dressing with Sense and Simplicity: Organic Fabric and Clothing

No one would like to eat a bowl of pesticides drenched food. Then why wear clothing doused in chemicals?

Centuries before people use to live in harmony with nature and believed in giving even better environment for their coming generations. Now, people have crossed all limits dominated by the voracity of luxuries, benefits and money. This is taking a serious toll on the environment, and on the lives of all living beings in the planet.

The ‘Chemical Cocktail’ of Clothing:

When considering a healthy lifestyle, fabric is the first thing that comes to mind. Synthetic fabrics’ teeming with chemicals and dyes pose severe health threats. Synthetic fibers makes the skin uncomfortable due to the presence of toxins in them. From towels to bed linens, and clothes they are all-pervading in our everyday life. Apart from the potential health hazards to humans, these synthetic fibers also leach into the environment causing serious damages to soil, air, ground water, and other living beings around us.

The Environment Shield Organization of US has declared that seven out of the top fifteen pesticides are used for growing conventional cotton, and are regarded as the most environment polluting pesticides. On the contrary, organic cotton is cultivated using untreated GMO seeds, and by adopting biological based growing practices. A beneficial habitat planting method is adopted which prevents pests, thereby eliminating the usage of toxic chemicals.

stewartbrown 02 Room101 | Organic Fashion Design Pioneer Howard Brown

Natural Dyes Vs Synthetic Dyes:

Synthetic dyes involve many carcinogenic chemicals and effluents that are discharged into the river or atmosphere causing pollution. Chemicals used on fabrics can contain allergens, carcinogens and mutagens. Dyes that are used for special effects on textiles such as flame retardant, stain resistant etc., are likely to create health problems. Natural dyes are obtained from renewable sources, and are good to skin. They are bio-degradable and eco-friendly. Natural dyes are enriched with medicinal and curative properties, and impart healing qualities to the wearer of the fabric dyed with them. They save energy as they are not made from petroleum products. Furthermore, they provide rural employment, and also preserve traditional craftsmanship.

Life with natural fibers’:

Acrylic, polyester, nylon, rayon, triacetate, acetate and other fabrics labeled as stain & wrinkle resistant, and moth repellent will have ample amount of chemicals in their making. These fabrics can be avoided, and replaced with natural fabrics like wool, silk, cotton, linen, cashmere, and hemp. Organic and herbal clothing is more preferable for people who are very sensitive to chemicals. Researches on people with multiple chemical sensitivities reveal that organic clothing is essential in reducing their exposure to toxic chemicals.

 

Source: fibre2fashion.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Colours, Costume Design, Design, Eco Fashion, Eco Trends, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Themes, Knitwear, Lace, Lingerie, Management, Market Research, Men's Fashion, Merchandising, Niche Market, Organic, Personal Stylist, Production Pattern Maker, Research, Sales Representative, Swimwear, Target Market, Technical Designer, Technology, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 6 ) – Well Put Together

What to Include in Your Fashion Portfolio

What’s the most common faux pas when it comes to fashion design portfolios? Many fashion design students and entry-level apparel designers make the mistake of filling their fashion portfolios with all of their favorite fashion illustrations, or photos of garments they’ve made.
The trouble with this is that apparel industry companies don’t need to see tons of imaginative avant-garde fashion sketches – who’s really going to wear that stuff? They just don’t sell! Don’t get me wrong, you should still show off some fashion figure illustrations and your ability to develop an apparel design collection, but following an organized presentation format is a much better approach to showing off your fashion design talents and skills.

Choose Your Dream Market

First thing’s first: decide in which market you want to have your fashion career, and make a list of fashion industry companies that fit into that category. For example, if you would love to be a fashion designer for a better sportswear collection such as Bebe, other fashion companies on your list could include Armani Exchange, Anthropology, and DKNY. Then take some time to look into the companies you chose. What’s their design philosophy? Who is their customer? Where do they draw inspiration from, and what does their current collection look like?

Once you’re familiar with the type of fashion industry companies you want to design for, think about what they want to see from you – the fashion designer. You’ll need to show that you have an eye for style and can create a cohesive apparel design collection for a specific customer, and the company should be able to identify with the price point and styling of your fashion designs.

Putting It All Together

In addition, most entry level or assistant fashion designers start out sketching computer fashion flats, assembling fashion presentation boards, and preparing apparel tech packs. Show your prospective employers that you’ve got each area covered! Develop a series of 3 to 6 small groups with 6 – 8 fashion figures or complete outfits per group. Start off each design group with an inspiration page: a collage of images, fabric swatches and other findings that help set the mood and introduce the color story for the group. Next come the fashion illustrations, which show fashion figures in various poses wearing your apparel designs. These fashion sketches will demonstrate how garments will look on a fashion body and give you the opportunity to express how you would match up each piece to create coordinated outfits.

 

Following your fashion figure illustrations are flat sketches or floats (stylized flats). A “flat” is basically a black and white sketch of how a garment looks when laid flat. Fashion flats must be clean, correctly proportioned, and include all garment details like: seams, topstitching, buttons and hardware. While some apparel companies still sketch flats by hand, the vast majority creates flat sketches via computer so it is important that you are comfortable using popular CAD software such as Adobe Illustrator for the fashion industry.

Apparel floats are more stylized versions of flat sketches that usually show some kind of movement in the garment. Alternating the use of flats and floats from one fashion design group to another is a good way to add variety to your fashion presentation layout while showing your versatility. Fashion CADs (flat sketches rendered with colors and fabrics) can also be incorporated into a group of your fashion illustrations or flats and can be added as a separate section.

 

And please don’t just display your fashion sketches on a plain white or solid color page! Tie each design group together using fashion backgrounds that follow the theme for each group. Fashion backgrounds are an extra opportunity to show your creativity and fashion presentation skills.

Does Size Really Matter?

In a word: yes! Make sure your fashion design portfolio is a manageable size. Most likely, you’ll be showing your fashion portfolio in an office and need to open it on a small or cluttered desk. Anything larger than 9″ x 12″ is just too large and unnecessary. I remember making my first fashion portfolio 11″ x 17″ (the advice of a college professor, believe it or not). As you can imagine, it was not practical at all – I even recall one interview in a small office where I had to present my apparel design portfolio from my lap!

That being said, by following these guidelines, you’ll be sure to create a kick butt fashion design portfolio that will get your talents noticed and give your fashion career a competitive edge amongst other apparel design candidates!

Source: Designernexus.com

 

Read also:

Leave a comment

Filed under Apparel Production Manager, Business, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Competition, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Exhibition, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Trade Show, Lingerie, Lookbook, Make-Up Artist, Market Research, Marketing Manager, Marketing Strategy, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, PR Manager, Presentation, Production Pattern Maker, Publicity, Sales Representative, Shoes, Sunglasses, Swimwear, Target Market, Technical Designer, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 5 ) – Fulfilling Your Vision

Becoming Your Own Fashion Designer

I know some of you may have been disappointed by the realities we exposed in our “How to Become a Fashion Designer” article series. Our apologies, but we had to destroy the bliss of naivety to spare you from many rude awakenings when you start your fashion career! That being said, I’m sure there are also some of you who are determined to become that ideal vision of a fashion designer: create your own label, design your own fashion lines, runway fashion show and the whole nine. We commend your ambitiousness and of course, we are here to help! Here’s our suggested approach to become your own fashion designer.

Learn the Fashion Biz

First thing’s first, and we’ve all heard it a million times: Fashion is first and foremost a business. Yes it’s true – you could have the best apparel collection in the world, but if you don’t have the business savvy to manage your fashion design operations or market yourself; you’re in for a rough and disappointing journey in the fashion industry. Countless talented fashion designers try creating an apparel line without the proper business foundation to support them. Issac Mizrahi, and Narciso Rodriguez are just a few well-known fashion designers whose fashion careers were almost destroyed by their lack of business knowledge.

We highly recommend educating yourself and taking business courses- either in school or on your own. Really get to know the fashion industry. However, if for some reason you prefer not to, you should at the very least seek a knowledgeable (and trustworthy) business partner to handle that end for you.

Finding a Niche

Concerning the actual apparel designs, if you want to make your mark and get noticed in the fashion industry, you have to make sure your apparel designs stand out amongst the swarm of pretty outfits already crowding the runways. If your vision for your collection is just to design “pretty” clothes, the chances of your work getting noticed are like finding a needle in a haystack! The cliché word of advice is to design for a niche market. But what does that mean?

A Cause for Design

Here’s our take on finding a niche: find a cause, and design for that cause. Choose something that you’re passionate about, or pick a theme and design for that theme. Create a trademark that you will become known for. Betsey Johnson is known for her funky, outrageous, one-of-a-kind garments that reflect her quirky personality. Diesel created their highly functional, hardware driven signature style from the construction worker lifestyle. When apparel designs are consistently focused around a specific element or concept, they will receive more attention and that concept will become your design signature. Once your fashion line is established and well known, you can always expand. And whatever you decide on, make sure it’s something you believe in; something you are passionate about. When your fashion designs come from the heart, it shows, and you’re inspiration will be endless.

Get Your Name Out There!

So once you’ve selected your cause and designed an extraordinary apparel collection around it, how do you make sure your fashion designs get publicity? Fortunately, modern technology makes promoting yourself a much easier task. There are tons of venues that showcase emerging fashion designers such as nolcha.com and haute.net (See the Independent and Underground Fashion at our Resource Center for more links). There you will find underground designer showcases that give beginner designers their own venue space. You bring the designs – they bring in the crowds.

In the past few years, an underground fashion revolution has emerged, creating a shift in the apparel industry. Consumers are tired of apparel fashion clothing that is dictated by an elite few fashion designers, and have begun searching for more unique, down to earth sources for their apparel & fashion needs. New waves of fashion designers are discovered in unconventional places and recognized for their individual fashion design styles. Educating yourself, knowing the business, designing for a cause you love, and promoting yourself through new avenues are all steps in the right direction towards having the fashion design career you’ve always envisioned!

Source: Designernexus.com

 

Read also:

Leave a comment

Filed under Apparel Production Manager, Bikinis, Business, Colours, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Eco Trends, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Competition, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Exhibition, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Themes, Fashion Trade Show, Lingerie, Make-Up Artist, Market Research, Marketing Manager, Men's Fashion, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, PR Manager, Presentation, Production Pattern Maker, Promotion, Publicity, Sales Representative, Shoes, Sunglasses, Swimsuits, Swimwear, Target Market, Technical Designer, Technology, Trends, Underwear

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 3 ) – Fashion Designer Skills 101

Important Skills that Fashion Schools – Don’t Cover Nearly Enough

In fashion school most of your time was spent learning how to draw fashion sketches, drape, sew, and create garment flat patterns. While these are certainly good skills for fashion designers to have, they aren’t very practical when you’re trying to land your first design job in the fashion industry. In the real world you’ll be expected to know how to draw fashion flat sketches, measure garment specs, and create CADs and presentation boards. I know some of you are thinking “But I learned those things in school too!.” To which I reply: “You think you know, but you have no idea!”

Apparel Draping and Patternmaking

Take it from experience: fashion schools don’t focus on the above skills nearly enough to fully prepare you for your first job in apparel design. Patternmaking and draping are valuable skills, which come in handy when you are dealing with a lot of apparel fittings. Usually garment fittings are conducted by technical designers, but if you are interested in a fashion design career for creative reasons, you’ll most likely be miserable in this type of position. On the creative side of fashion design, all you need is a basic understanding of what creates a good fit, and how to fix a bad one. In the vast majority of apparel designer positions, hands-on patternmaking skills are not necessary, unless you plan to enter Project Runway!

Sewing

On the creative side of fashion design, sewing is as relevant as patternmaking is for technical design. It’s good to understand the general concepts of garment construction, but you don’t need to be a seamstress. In the apparel industry, if you need to know how a certain garment is constructed, there are tons of references available: from apparel in clothing stores, to “how to” fashion design books and online articles. The point I’m trying to make is: if your sewing skills leave something to be desired, don’t stress over it.

Illustration

Sadly, fashion illustrations are a dying art in the fashion industry – they are very scarcely used by apparel designers in the real world. They take too much time and have no practical application. The fashion illustration has been replaced with computer drawn stylized garment sketches (floats) or more accurate technical flats (flat sketches), which are more popular for their practicality. Not only do they present a clear representation of the apparel design concept, but they are also a must have when it comes to garment production. Fashion flats can be turned into CADs and can be used in mood/presentation boards. Amazingly, fashion schools have not followed this industry shift, and still focus more heavily on fashion illustrations, and not enough on flat sketching.

Computer Programs

I can’t stress enough the importance of knowing popular computer applications for creating fashion flats, floats, and CAD sketches. Most apparel design companies expect proficiency in Adobe IllustratorAdobe Photoshop, and Microsoft Excel. These programs are relatively affordable in comparison to other fashion industry specific software, which run from $7Kto $30K per user – yikes! Unfortunately, the coverage of Illustrator and Photoshop provided by fashion schools does not meet the actual demands of the apparel industry. Many fashion companies also request knowledge of WebPDM, so if your fashion college offers a course in this program, it would be wise to take it. If your fashion school does not teach WebPDM, make it a point to find a school or venue that offers this program and take it!

On the Interview

It’s amazing how many fashion design candidates are rejected because they don’t know the most important basics. I’ll look at applicants’ fashion portfolios: filled with beautiful, well-drawn fashion illustrations and then say “That’s nice, but can you draw flat sketches?” If fashion flat sketches are included in their portfolios, they are usually very basic, lack important details, and are not visually appealing. If the candidate’s apparel sketches are halfway decent; my next question is “do you know Illustrator and Photoshop?” Almost everyone says yes,but when tested, it’s usually far from the truth. It’s not that they are lying… a lot of fashion design graduates and even professional designers seriously believe they know these programs well. They did well according to the fashion school standards; but fashion schools don’t teach how to use Illustrator and Photoshop for fashion designwell enough for entry level fashion designers to be competent in the demanding apparel industry. Fashion schools just cover the basics, which are quickly forgotten without practice. Take the extra effort to explore these and other CAD programs beyond what fashion schools teach: read books, find online courses and tutorials. Not only will you be ready with the skills you need to succeed in the fashion industry, but discussing how you went the extra mile to keep up with apparel industry standards will definitely impress any prospective employer!

Practice, practice, practice

My suggestion is to practice flat sketching as often as you can. Make sure you learn and are really comfortable with Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop for Fashion Design – what you’ve learned in fashion school is not enough!! To acquire additional knowledge: read books, take additional courses, (offered in either classroom or online settings). Take a look at industry standard examples of flat sketches. Our Fashion Flats section contains many free downloads of flat sketches in both JPEG and vector (Illustrator) formats for your reference. If you can improve your skills to reach the quality of those shown, you’ll be in very good shape. They are free for you to use. Please download them so you can also use them as slopers to trace and basics to work from.

Educate Yourself!

Many fashion schools such as FIT in New York (Fashion Institute of Technology) offer “Flats and Specs for the Fashion Industry” courses. But believe it or not, they are not required by the curriculum; they are electives! These are some of the most important skills that fashion design students should be learning. Another good elective course is “Creative Fashion Presentation” – this skill is very handy. Sales people use CAD fashion presentations a lot as visual aids. In addition they create a good impression and convey your creativity level. If you can make outstanding fashion presentations, you’ll be asked to make them often, and believe me: it’s much more fun to make presentation boards than do fittings, send faxes, and organize showrooms.

Creating Specs in a Copycat Industry

So now we can talk about specs (garment specifications). Knowing how to spec (measure and detail) a garment is a fundamental skill for a fashion designer. Many apparel companies create their fashion spec sheets using Microsoft Excel. Although garment sizes and measurements vary from one fashion company to another, if you know the principles, you’ll be able to quickly adapt to the standards of any company. You don’t even need to know how to develop apparel specs from scratch!

As a head fashion designer, I’ve had to make decisions on what garment spec standards to use. Often I simply went to different fashion stores, and found garments with good fit and copied the basic measurements. And this isn’t a rare practice – the fashion industry is a major copycat industry: most apparel that we see hanging in the stores are knock-offs of another fashion brand, who copied the design from another design brand, and so on. There are even official terms for copied fashions! A “knockoff” is when a style is copied, and a “rub-off” is when patterns are copied. Once, while I was on a European shopping trip in London, a sales person at a store noticed I was a fashion designer collecting design ideas for an upcoming season. He mentioned that his store received a constant flow of fashion designers from American design companies such as Calvin Klein, whose designers come to knockoff their merchandise. That’s right: even top fashion design brands use knockoffs for their ready-to-wear collections.

Givenchy Fall Winter 2010/2011 Haute Couture - Veladoras: long   corseted dress hand embroidered in an open lace design in golden thread,   fine gold chain and crystals worn with a tail coat embroidered with   hand cut gold metallic sequins and crystals; Coronos: long corseted   dress embroidered with hand cut gold metallic sequins and crystals

To sum it up: in order to get a job in the fashion industry before the rest of the entry level fashion design candidates, you need to focus on refining skills that are highly demanded in the apparel industry. Become proficient in drawing flat sketches and include apparel flats in your fashion portfolio, and be extremely comfortable and knowledgeable in Illustrator and Photoshop. Check out the My Practical Skills Store, where you’ll find our ebook tutorials for Adobe IllustratorAdobe PhotoshopMicrosoft Excel, and How to Spec a Garment for the Fashion Industry. Each ebook contains easy to follow tutorials, with illustrations every step of the way. They are designed to prepare you with comprehensive industry specific skills and foundations to give your fashion design career a competitive edge.

Source: designernexus.com

Read also:

7 Comments

Filed under Agency, Apparel Production Manager, Business, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Make-Up Artist, Management, Marketing Manager, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, PR Manager, Production Pattern Maker, Sales Representative, Target Market, Technical Designer, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 2 ) – Fashion Industry Career Specializations

Fashion Industry Career Specializations -BREAK IT DOWN

Coming straight from fashion school, you might be thinking that as a fashion designer, you’ll have the opportunity to work with all types of apparel. But what you may not know is that generally, the fashion industry is split into categories, and then categories within categories. Basically, the apparel industry is very specialized.
The breakdown begins with price (which usually corresponds with quality). The lowest apparel classification is Discount, and at the height of fashion is Haute Couture:
  • Discount Fashion: These stores sell fashion merchandise that retails at a discounted price from what other apparel stores charge. Outlet malls or stores like Ross, Walmart, Target, or Conway are example of discount retailers that sell discount labels.

  • Budget / Mass Market Fashion: Mass market apparel usually consists of knock offs of higher priced designer fashions that are sold at low competitive prices to the masses. Old Navy, Forever 21, and Charlotte Russe are a few popular budget apparel labels. Department stores in this category include JC Penney, and Kohl’s. This fashion market usually retails for less than $100.

  • Moderate Fashion: These include nationally advertised apparel fashion brands such as Nine West, Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Express, and Zara. Examples of moderate department stores are Macy’s and Dillards. These apparel brands typically retail for less than $300.

  • Contemporary Fashion: More than just a specific price point, this classification is a fashion-forward image often aimed at women in their ’20s and early ’30s looking for trendy fashions priced more affordably than Designer pieces. BCBG, Betsey Johnson, Bebe, and Rebecca Taylor fall into the Contemporary fashion category, which usually retails for under $500.

  • Better Fashion: Also selling for less than $500, these collections use better quality fabric and styling than lower-priced brands. Armani Exchange, Jones New York and Anne Klein are a few examples of better-priced apparel lines.

  • Bridge Fashion: Priced under $1,000, these apparel fashion lines serve as a “bridge” between better and designer fashion categories. Bridge fashion includes names like Ellen Tracy, Dana Buchman, DKNY, Emporio Armani, and Lauren by Ralph Lauren.

  • Designer Fashion: True fashion designer collections typically sell for more than $1,000 per item. The fabrics, fit, details, and trims are superior to other ready-to-wear items. Some examples of designer labels are Gucci, Prada, Versace, Armani, and Chanel.

  • Haute Couture / Avant-garde Fashion: Also know as couture, these terms have been commonly misused by ready-to-wear brands. Haute Couture, or simply “couture” fashion designers sell custom, made-to-measure apparel, which costs tens of thousands of dollars, and is affordable only to a select few. Technically speaking, there are only ten official Haute Couture Fashion Houses including: Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Chanel, and Givenchy. Avant-garde fashion designers produce high quality, one-of-a-kind garments that experiment with new fashion design concepts and push the envelope of popular apparel design.

Even within the fashion industry categories listed above, each apparel market is broken down into more specific career specializations. First, fashion companies are broken down by customer: men’s, women’s, children’s etc. Then are further divided by type of apparel: sportswear, eveningwear (special occasion), sleepwear etc. And then even fashion design teams are designated to specific areas like Wovens, Knits, Sweaters, Tops, Bottoms, Dresses, Outerwear and so on.

A discouraging thing to note about the fashion industry is that it is very difficult to move from one career category to another. If you start building your fashion design career with mass-market apparel companies, you’re going to face some barriers when you apply for that dream fashion designer job at Ralph Lauren. The same goes for apparel design specialties. If you’re experienced in designing children’s woven tops, chances are you won’t land a position designing women’s dresses. If you’re absolutely determined on making a switch in the fashion industry, you’re best bet is to start from the bottom in your desired career field and work your way up again.

Something else to consider is the different types of apparel manufacturers and retailers out there. There are fashion manufacturers who design and produce their own apparel designs, which are then sold to fashion retailers. These manufacturers do not have their own retail fashion stores. Examples include Shoshanna, Jones New York and Carmen Marc Valvo. There are also fashion manufacturers that own licenses for a variety of brands. For example, at the time of this writing, Phillips Van Heusen (PVH) owns Calvin Klein and IZOD, but licenses brands like DKNY, Sean Jean, and Kenneth Cole.

Then, there are fashion retailers that only sell merchandise purchased from manufacturers. These include stores like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. There are also many manufacturers that also have their own fashion retail locations such as Polo Ralph Lauren, Armani Exchange and Nicole Miller. Other apparel retail stores have their own product development teams and have merchandise manufactured specifically for their private label designs such as Gap, Old Navy, and Express. In addition to purchasing merchandise from outside manufacturers, many department stores also have their own private label collections. Examples are: I.N.C. (Macy’s), and Arizona Jeans (JC Penney).

Pre-Fall 2011

The largest employment opportunities out there lie within mass-market apparel companies. They often pay rather well to begin with, however these figures usually level off after a few years of experience. The higher-end fashion markets pay less to start, and work hours are longer, but the prestige you’ll receive from such reputable companies will do wonders for your resume.

Source: Desigernexus.com

 

Read also:


1 Comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Agency, Apparel Production Manager, Business, Commercial, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Digital Creative, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Lookbook, Luxury Brand, Magazines, Make-Up Artist, Management, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Manager, Merchandising, Motionbook, Networking, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, PR Manager, Presentation, Print, Production Pattern Maker, Publicity, Research, Sales Representative, Target Market, Technical Designer, Television, Trends, Viral Campaign, Window Display