Category Archives: Fashion Show

Fantasy Hairstyling, Pushing the Limits! – Hair Battle Spectacular

 

Fantasy hair is all about pushing the limits of traditional hairstyling. It can include the use of clothing, ornaments, and props to achieve the desired look, and it’s almost always pulled to the top of the head. Fantasy hair competition — which has been around for decades — pits contestants against each other to create a total look of hair, makeup, and clothing in a limited amount of time.


Hosted by actress Brooke Burns, this competition series pits 10 of America’s hottest stylists against each other to see who can deliver the biggest and best in fantasy hair design.

Part sculpture and part pop art, each challenge requires contestants to create outrageous coifs that resemble everything from multi-layer wedding cakes to toys with moveable pieces. The stylists then enter the ring to present their hair creations in a fully produced, dramatic and stylized performance. After each challenge, the judges — award-winning fantasy hair designer Derek J, celebrity stylist Lindsay Albanese and a rotating guest judge — critique the designers on creativity, execution and overall presentation.

 

In addition to blow-by-blow drama in the arena, there is also the day-to-day drama between the cohabitating stylists who fight each week to stay in the game and win the ultimate prize of $100,000.

“Hair Battle Spectacular” is produced by 3 Ball Productions with JD Roth, Todd Nelson, Adam Greener, and Mike Nichols serving as executive producers.

 

Source: hair-battle-spectacular.oxygen.com

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Colours, Design, Fashion, Fashion Competition, Fashion Exhibition, Fashion Hair Stylist, Fashion Industry, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Model, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Trade Show, Hair, Hair Colour, Hair Cuts, Hairstyle, Make-Up, Make-Up Artist, Personal Stylist, Presentation, Publicity, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 8 ) – Look Good on Paper

Writing a Resume and Cover Letter That Will Get You in the Door


The resume is your marketing tool that will sell employers on the idea of interviewing you. Even if you’re an ideal candidate for the position, if you don’t look good on paper, recruiters won’t give you a second glance. Not only do your skills and qualifications have to impress, but you need to make sure they stand out amongst the hundreds, and in some cases, thousands of other resumes that companies will receive for the same position. Keep reading to find out how to create a well organized, intelligent resume that will get you through the door!

What They Want to Know

Your resume should include the following information:

  • Contact info: Basic information about yourself that also serves as your header. Include: Name, Address, Phone, and Email
  • Objective: A brief statement (one or two sentences) describing the position you are seeking and how you hope to contribute to an employer.
  • Education: Name of school, Years attended, Concentration, Degree received, GPA (if above 3.0)
  • Qualifications/Skills: An itemized list describing relevant abilities such as knowledge of computer programs, languages, etc.
  • Work Experience: chronological list of previous employers, starting with the most recent. Include position held, duration, and important responsibilities/accomplishments.
  • Honors and Awards: List any honors and awards and year received.
  • Course Highlights/Relevant Activities: If you have limited work experience, list course highlights, or relevant extracurricular activities, clubs, or organizations you may have participated in.

There are tons of resume creating resources and examples out there, many of which can be misleading and inaccurate. If you choose to seek more examples, make sure you select a reputable source. Click on the resume sample link below to see our example of a well formatted, clearly organized resume.

What They Don’t Want to See

Knowing what not to include can be just as important as knowing what to include. When listing work responsibilities, don’t over exaggerate – a professional recruiter can see right through an unrealistic resume. Also avoid making general statements- if you can, always list specifics to support your qualifications. For example, instead of citing “designed collection of dresses”, state “designed and illustrated 5 piece dress collection for Fall 2007 collection”. Giving specifics adds individuality and gives the recruiter better insight into your achievements.

When listing job responsibilities, it’s a good idea to use action verbs to add variety to your statements. Write Express has a good variety of action verbs to choose from. And then of course are the basic resume no-no’s: any personal info like age, religion, race, and salary requirements have no business in your resume.

Formatting

There are of course many different ways to format your resume, but keep in mind that your resume has only a few seconds to grad the recruiter’s attention so if it’s not easy to follow, you won’t stand a chance! As an entry-level candidate or even after a few years of experience, your resume should not exceed one page. Recruiters won’t care what high school you went to (unless it was industry specific), or what your hobbies are, so keeping your content concise and relevant to the desired position is a good way to maintain a reasonable length.

Just because your resume is clean and organized, doesn’t mean you can’t get a little creative with it. Experimenting with different fonts and coloring for your headers is one way to make your resume stand out amongst a sea of black and white. If your field is eveningwear, using a delicate script for your headers can be a great accent. Just remember to keep it simple- the fonts should still be legible and should support, not detract from your resume.

Presentation

While you will probably use Microsoft Word or a similar word processing program to create your resume, if your resume is going to be emailed, you should convert the file to PDF. When printing your resume, select a professional presentation paper. Your local stationery or office supply store has tons to choose from. Once again, paper choice should not detract from the content of your resume or affect its appearance if your resume is faxed or photocopied.

Cover Letter

Anytime you fax or email your resume, it should be accompanied by a cover letter. The first thing that recruiter reads, the contents of your cover letter should serve as an introduction and offers an opportunity to talk briefly about your background and knowledge of the company. You should definitely invest the time to make your cover letter well-written and well-focused. A poorly written, vague cover letter is a surefire way to get your resume overlooked.

Without repeating the details of your resume, introduce yourself to your prospective employer in three or four concise paragraphs including the following points:

  • Why you are writing / the position of interest
  • What you have to offer the company (accomplishments, work ethic etc)
  • Your knowledge, enthusiasm and reasons for interest in the company
  • Request an interview and specify how you will follow up

Keep in mind that the desired outcome of the cover letter is for the recruiter to take action so it should be tailored specifically to the company you’re applying to instead of for a general position. Use your company research (you did research the company right?) and draw upon your knowledge of what they usually look for in successful employees to demonstrate how you can be an asset to their organization.

A quick word about following up: do it! I cannot tell you how many interviews I’ve received because I followed up after sending my resume. Not only does it demonstrate your follow up skills (very important) but it emphasizes your interest in the position. In one instance, a recruiter told me that from over 300 resumes he received, he contacted me for an interview because I was one of a handful of people who actually followed up. A handful (out of 300+) sounds like a pretty good way to make yourself stand out!

Once you’ve prepared your resume and cover letter, proofread them more than once to catch any mistakes or irrelevant information. Have a friend take a look to catch any mistakes you might have missed. When you’ve finished your resume, you’re ready to begin applying for positions! Remember that even after you’re hired, your resume should grow along with you. Keep it constantly updated as you gain experience and skills and when it’s time for you to look for another position, you’ll be glad you spent the time on it along the way.

Source: Designernexus.com

 

Read also:

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Costume Design, Design, Eco Fashion, Fashion, Fashion Competition, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Lookbook, Market Research, Networking, Niche Market, Presentation, Promotion, Publicity, Research, Target Market, Trends

Spring/Summer 2011 Updo Hair Trends

Spring/Summer 2011 Updo Trends

There is nothing sexier and more elegant than a simple updo that adds interest to your neckline and brings a glamorous, yet effortless vibe to any appearance. From different versions of the famous ballerina bun to extremely severe, slicked chignons and high top knots, updos will be one of the hottest hairstyles for spring/summer 2011.

Spring/summer 2011 comes with a wide palette of beautiful, feminine hairstyles. Among all these, there is one timeless trend exuding maximum femininity and sophistication: the updo. Seen in a myriad of different versions suitable for numerous occasions, an updo is universally flattering and works amazing on long and medium-lengthR hair.

Versatile and practical, an updo will always add a special vibe to your looks, whether you choose a simple bun, a messy, festival-chic one, a polished chignon, or, a sophisticated knot with a retro appeal.

Diane Von Furstenberg                                     Jil Sander
The ballerina bun was one of the hairstyles chosen by many designers for spring/summer 2011. Its elegance and simplicity makes it one of the best options when it comes to finding the perfect hairstyle for a casual, daytime outfit, or for a more special event that requires a more chic appearance.
Classic and tidy at Nina Ricci and Jil Sander or rather messy, yet attentively studied at Diane von Furstenberg, there are various versions where to choose from. It is very practical and it can be done in an instant. You just have to make a ponytail and wrap the hair around the elastic band, then secure the bun.
Hervé Léger by Max Azria                                Nina Ricci
Summer is all about flirty and playful, just-got-out-of-bed looks with breezy, romantic dresses and appropriate hairstyles. You can enjoy this amazing season to the fullest going for effortless, yet feminine, adorable hairstyles such as a romantic chignon as spotted at Proenza Schouler and Dsquared². Moreover, if you want to add a glamorous feeling, yet preserve a sweet look, you can draw your inspiration from the Dolce & Gabbana or Nina Ricci runway shows where the chignon reveals sophistication through a simple approach, perfect for a candid and luminous character. This is a simple and chic updo with minimal styling required. 


Dolce & Gabbana                                                        Proenza Schouler

Dsquared²                                                                      Nina Ricci
As we have seen, there are timeless hairstyles that never go out of fashion and keep reinventing themselves season after season. Well, this is the case of the elegant chignon that never seems to fail due to its numerous versions and ladylike luxurious aspect. This is why it can be said that this type of updo is among the most popular choices when it comes to chic hairstyles. 

For spring/summer 2011, a refined, office-appropriate approach of the chignon was spotted at Chloé, with hair worn at the nape of the neck, and Gucci, in a slicked way with a total wet effect. However, a more elegant and extremely polished updo that you can rock at a special event is the one seen at Oscar de la Renta and the French twist from Zac Posen.

Chloé                                                                                   Gucci

Oscar de la Renta                                                     Zac Posen
The newest hairstyle trends for spring/summer 2011 will feature adorable and unique shapes and styles. Creative knots oozing self-confidence and relaxation, yet glamour and style will be some of the hottest hairstyle trends for the warm season. Looking just like twisted sculptures, the updos seen at Gucci and Viktor & Rolf are effective without creating the illusion of trying too hard. 

There is nothing more comfortable and sweet than wearing your hair up during hot summer days when the heat might get quite unbearable. In this circumstances, a high top knot can easily do the trick without too much effort. This hairstyle screams spontaneity and laid-back style and it works great even on curly hair. Draw your inspiration from Z Spoke by Zac Posen and Moschino. Add a headband or a scarf for a unique look.


Gucci                                                                                   Viktor & Rolf

Z Spoke by Zac Posen                                                  Moschino
Photos via elle.com

1 Comment

Filed under Design, Fashion, Fashion Hair Stylist, Fashion Industry, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Hair, Hair Colour, Hair Cuts, Hairstyle, Luxury Brand, Make-Up Artist, Personal Stylist, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 6 ) – Well Put Together

What to Include in Your Fashion Portfolio

What’s the most common faux pas when it comes to fashion design portfolios? Many fashion design students and entry-level apparel designers make the mistake of filling their fashion portfolios with all of their favorite fashion illustrations, or photos of garments they’ve made.
The trouble with this is that apparel industry companies don’t need to see tons of imaginative avant-garde fashion sketches – who’s really going to wear that stuff? They just don’t sell! Don’t get me wrong, you should still show off some fashion figure illustrations and your ability to develop an apparel design collection, but following an organized presentation format is a much better approach to showing off your fashion design talents and skills.

Choose Your Dream Market

First thing’s first: decide in which market you want to have your fashion career, and make a list of fashion industry companies that fit into that category. For example, if you would love to be a fashion designer for a better sportswear collection such as Bebe, other fashion companies on your list could include Armani Exchange, Anthropology, and DKNY. Then take some time to look into the companies you chose. What’s their design philosophy? Who is their customer? Where do they draw inspiration from, and what does their current collection look like?

Once you’re familiar with the type of fashion industry companies you want to design for, think about what they want to see from you – the fashion designer. You’ll need to show that you have an eye for style and can create a cohesive apparel design collection for a specific customer, and the company should be able to identify with the price point and styling of your fashion designs.

Putting It All Together

In addition, most entry level or assistant fashion designers start out sketching computer fashion flats, assembling fashion presentation boards, and preparing apparel tech packs. Show your prospective employers that you’ve got each area covered! Develop a series of 3 to 6 small groups with 6 – 8 fashion figures or complete outfits per group. Start off each design group with an inspiration page: a collage of images, fabric swatches and other findings that help set the mood and introduce the color story for the group. Next come the fashion illustrations, which show fashion figures in various poses wearing your apparel designs. These fashion sketches will demonstrate how garments will look on a fashion body and give you the opportunity to express how you would match up each piece to create coordinated outfits.

 

Following your fashion figure illustrations are flat sketches or floats (stylized flats). A “flat” is basically a black and white sketch of how a garment looks when laid flat. Fashion flats must be clean, correctly proportioned, and include all garment details like: seams, topstitching, buttons and hardware. While some apparel companies still sketch flats by hand, the vast majority creates flat sketches via computer so it is important that you are comfortable using popular CAD software such as Adobe Illustrator for the fashion industry.

Apparel floats are more stylized versions of flat sketches that usually show some kind of movement in the garment. Alternating the use of flats and floats from one fashion design group to another is a good way to add variety to your fashion presentation layout while showing your versatility. Fashion CADs (flat sketches rendered with colors and fabrics) can also be incorporated into a group of your fashion illustrations or flats and can be added as a separate section.

 

And please don’t just display your fashion sketches on a plain white or solid color page! Tie each design group together using fashion backgrounds that follow the theme for each group. Fashion backgrounds are an extra opportunity to show your creativity and fashion presentation skills.

Does Size Really Matter?

In a word: yes! Make sure your fashion design portfolio is a manageable size. Most likely, you’ll be showing your fashion portfolio in an office and need to open it on a small or cluttered desk. Anything larger than 9″ x 12″ is just too large and unnecessary. I remember making my first fashion portfolio 11″ x 17″ (the advice of a college professor, believe it or not). As you can imagine, it was not practical at all – I even recall one interview in a small office where I had to present my apparel design portfolio from my lap!

That being said, by following these guidelines, you’ll be sure to create a kick butt fashion design portfolio that will get your talents noticed and give your fashion career a competitive edge amongst other apparel design candidates!

Source: Designernexus.com

 

Read also:

Leave a comment

Filed under Apparel Production Manager, Business, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Competition, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Exhibition, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Trade Show, Lingerie, Lookbook, Make-Up Artist, Market Research, Marketing Manager, Marketing Strategy, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, PR Manager, Presentation, Production Pattern Maker, Publicity, Sales Representative, Shoes, Sunglasses, Swimwear, Target Market, Technical Designer, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 5 ) – Fulfilling Your Vision

Becoming Your Own Fashion Designer

I know some of you may have been disappointed by the realities we exposed in our “How to Become a Fashion Designer” article series. Our apologies, but we had to destroy the bliss of naivety to spare you from many rude awakenings when you start your fashion career! That being said, I’m sure there are also some of you who are determined to become that ideal vision of a fashion designer: create your own label, design your own fashion lines, runway fashion show and the whole nine. We commend your ambitiousness and of course, we are here to help! Here’s our suggested approach to become your own fashion designer.

Learn the Fashion Biz

First thing’s first, and we’ve all heard it a million times: Fashion is first and foremost a business. Yes it’s true – you could have the best apparel collection in the world, but if you don’t have the business savvy to manage your fashion design operations or market yourself; you’re in for a rough and disappointing journey in the fashion industry. Countless talented fashion designers try creating an apparel line without the proper business foundation to support them. Issac Mizrahi, and Narciso Rodriguez are just a few well-known fashion designers whose fashion careers were almost destroyed by their lack of business knowledge.

We highly recommend educating yourself and taking business courses- either in school or on your own. Really get to know the fashion industry. However, if for some reason you prefer not to, you should at the very least seek a knowledgeable (and trustworthy) business partner to handle that end for you.

Finding a Niche

Concerning the actual apparel designs, if you want to make your mark and get noticed in the fashion industry, you have to make sure your apparel designs stand out amongst the swarm of pretty outfits already crowding the runways. If your vision for your collection is just to design “pretty” clothes, the chances of your work getting noticed are like finding a needle in a haystack! The cliché word of advice is to design for a niche market. But what does that mean?

A Cause for Design

Here’s our take on finding a niche: find a cause, and design for that cause. Choose something that you’re passionate about, or pick a theme and design for that theme. Create a trademark that you will become known for. Betsey Johnson is known for her funky, outrageous, one-of-a-kind garments that reflect her quirky personality. Diesel created their highly functional, hardware driven signature style from the construction worker lifestyle. When apparel designs are consistently focused around a specific element or concept, they will receive more attention and that concept will become your design signature. Once your fashion line is established and well known, you can always expand. And whatever you decide on, make sure it’s something you believe in; something you are passionate about. When your fashion designs come from the heart, it shows, and you’re inspiration will be endless.

Get Your Name Out There!

So once you’ve selected your cause and designed an extraordinary apparel collection around it, how do you make sure your fashion designs get publicity? Fortunately, modern technology makes promoting yourself a much easier task. There are tons of venues that showcase emerging fashion designers such as nolcha.com and haute.net (See the Independent and Underground Fashion at our Resource Center for more links). There you will find underground designer showcases that give beginner designers their own venue space. You bring the designs – they bring in the crowds.

In the past few years, an underground fashion revolution has emerged, creating a shift in the apparel industry. Consumers are tired of apparel fashion clothing that is dictated by an elite few fashion designers, and have begun searching for more unique, down to earth sources for their apparel & fashion needs. New waves of fashion designers are discovered in unconventional places and recognized for their individual fashion design styles. Educating yourself, knowing the business, designing for a cause you love, and promoting yourself through new avenues are all steps in the right direction towards having the fashion design career you’ve always envisioned!

Source: Designernexus.com

 

Read also:

Leave a comment

Filed under Apparel Production Manager, Bikinis, Business, Colours, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Eco Trends, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Competition, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Exhibition, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Themes, Fashion Trade Show, Lingerie, Make-Up Artist, Market Research, Marketing Manager, Men's Fashion, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, PR Manager, Presentation, Production Pattern Maker, Promotion, Publicity, Sales Representative, Shoes, Sunglasses, Swimsuits, Swimwear, Target Market, Technical Designer, Technology, Trends, Underwear

Fashion Week Spring 2011: The Shoes

The Hot Shoes of Spring

The shoes are sexy, but the walking is treacherous.

Both on and off the runway, shoes were turning heads —and possibly a few ankles—at the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week’s Spring 2011 shows .

Whatever the style—be it a gladiator sandal, a platform wedge, or a stacked heel—there was a common theme: extreme height. So much so that more than a few women were spotted having to slip off their heels and slip on another shoe in order to navigate New York’s streets, especially in the cobble-stoned Meatpacking District where some fashion shows took place.

Walking on the Wild Side

The shoe excitement wasn’t confined to the runways. Plenty of fans turned out for the shows sporting shoes worthy of the spotlight. This pair of shoes worn by spectator Comora Roberson highlights the popular animal print trend for the spring. Roberson says she likes the print because she’s “not a black or a brown shoe girl.”

“I love them,” Roberson said. “You can’t really walk with them.”

A View From the Front Row

The shoes were particularly eye-catching in the front row. One example were the heels Julianne Moore wore to the Reed Krakoff Spring 2011 fashion show on Sept. 15. These were from Krakoff’s fall collection. For spring, he has a new version, this time made with boar hair.

High Fashion for The Masses

The designs at Fashion Week continue to become more accessible for fans. Collective Brands’ Payless ShoeSource has partnered with designers to bring high fashion to the masses. Christian Siriano, the designer who won the fourth season of the reality show Project Runway, is one of them.

Siriano’s spring collection drew on inspiration from India, China, and Africa. His shoes included heels that were almost architectural in their design. Pictured here is an example from his show at The Stage at Lincoln Center on Sept. 9, 2010, with a “chop-stick”-inspired wood heel with an electroplate finish.

Stacked

Designer Lela Rose also is working with Payless. Her shoe designs are named after streets in Lima, Peru. This striated wedge heel is “Loreto,” which the designer says was inspired by the city’s hillside landscape.

Other designers at fashion week were also showing stacked heels for spring.

Spring’s Pale Palette

Another common trend for spring are neutral colors. Here’s an example of an open-toed bootie that was shown at Nicole Miller’s show on Sept. 10 at 82 Mercer.

Would Michelle Wear These?

These metallic heels are a great pairing with the heavily beaded designs of Naeem Khan, who is known for his ultra-embellished gowns and cocktail dresses that have been worn by celebrities including Beyonce Knowles, Carrie Underwood, and First Lady Michelle Obama.

A Pop of Color

A model walks the runway wearing a teal, T-strap sandal at Naeem Khan’s show at the Stage in Lincoln Center on Sept. 16.

Vases and Amazons

The shoe styles were very exciting at Vassilios Kostetsos Spring 2011 fashion show at The Studio at Lincoln Center on Sept. 12.

The silver metallic color of this pair contrasted nicely with the gold and blue hues that dominated his collection. Kostetsos drew inspiration for his clothes from Greek ceramic vases and the ancient Amazon culture.

Defying Gravity?

Some of the shoes are beautiful to look at, but seem to defy the laws of physics. Here’s a particularly high heel worn by actress Gillian Jacobs as she walked around Lincoln Center.

L.A.M.B Roars Like a Lion

Award-winning musician and vocalist Gwen Stefani continues to wow with her sense of style. There’s a lot of buzz about this spring’s L.A.M.B. collection.

Here a model walks down the runway at the L.A.M.B. show at the Theater at Lincoln Center on Sept. 16, 2010.

Backstage at DvF

Speaking of shoes, “Sex and the City” star Sarah Jessica Parker stepped out several times at Fashion Week wearing head-turning footwear. Here’s a close-up of the shoes she wore to Diane von Furstenberg’s spring debut at the Theater at Lincoln Center on Sept. 12.

Source: CNBC.com

By Christina Cheddar-Berk


Leave a comment

Filed under Business, Celebrity, Colours, Design, Eco Fashion, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Show, Fashion Themes, Fashion Trade Show, Luxury Brand, Publicity, Trends

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 3 ) – Fashion Designer Skills 101

Important Skills that Fashion Schools – Don’t Cover Nearly Enough

In fashion school most of your time was spent learning how to draw fashion sketches, drape, sew, and create garment flat patterns. While these are certainly good skills for fashion designers to have, they aren’t very practical when you’re trying to land your first design job in the fashion industry. In the real world you’ll be expected to know how to draw fashion flat sketches, measure garment specs, and create CADs and presentation boards. I know some of you are thinking “But I learned those things in school too!.” To which I reply: “You think you know, but you have no idea!”

Apparel Draping and Patternmaking

Take it from experience: fashion schools don’t focus on the above skills nearly enough to fully prepare you for your first job in apparel design. Patternmaking and draping are valuable skills, which come in handy when you are dealing with a lot of apparel fittings. Usually garment fittings are conducted by technical designers, but if you are interested in a fashion design career for creative reasons, you’ll most likely be miserable in this type of position. On the creative side of fashion design, all you need is a basic understanding of what creates a good fit, and how to fix a bad one. In the vast majority of apparel designer positions, hands-on patternmaking skills are not necessary, unless you plan to enter Project Runway!

Sewing

On the creative side of fashion design, sewing is as relevant as patternmaking is for technical design. It’s good to understand the general concepts of garment construction, but you don’t need to be a seamstress. In the apparel industry, if you need to know how a certain garment is constructed, there are tons of references available: from apparel in clothing stores, to “how to” fashion design books and online articles. The point I’m trying to make is: if your sewing skills leave something to be desired, don’t stress over it.

Illustration

Sadly, fashion illustrations are a dying art in the fashion industry – they are very scarcely used by apparel designers in the real world. They take too much time and have no practical application. The fashion illustration has been replaced with computer drawn stylized garment sketches (floats) or more accurate technical flats (flat sketches), which are more popular for their practicality. Not only do they present a clear representation of the apparel design concept, but they are also a must have when it comes to garment production. Fashion flats can be turned into CADs and can be used in mood/presentation boards. Amazingly, fashion schools have not followed this industry shift, and still focus more heavily on fashion illustrations, and not enough on flat sketching.

Computer Programs

I can’t stress enough the importance of knowing popular computer applications for creating fashion flats, floats, and CAD sketches. Most apparel design companies expect proficiency in Adobe IllustratorAdobe Photoshop, and Microsoft Excel. These programs are relatively affordable in comparison to other fashion industry specific software, which run from $7Kto $30K per user – yikes! Unfortunately, the coverage of Illustrator and Photoshop provided by fashion schools does not meet the actual demands of the apparel industry. Many fashion companies also request knowledge of WebPDM, so if your fashion college offers a course in this program, it would be wise to take it. If your fashion school does not teach WebPDM, make it a point to find a school or venue that offers this program and take it!

On the Interview

It’s amazing how many fashion design candidates are rejected because they don’t know the most important basics. I’ll look at applicants’ fashion portfolios: filled with beautiful, well-drawn fashion illustrations and then say “That’s nice, but can you draw flat sketches?” If fashion flat sketches are included in their portfolios, they are usually very basic, lack important details, and are not visually appealing. If the candidate’s apparel sketches are halfway decent; my next question is “do you know Illustrator and Photoshop?” Almost everyone says yes,but when tested, it’s usually far from the truth. It’s not that they are lying… a lot of fashion design graduates and even professional designers seriously believe they know these programs well. They did well according to the fashion school standards; but fashion schools don’t teach how to use Illustrator and Photoshop for fashion designwell enough for entry level fashion designers to be competent in the demanding apparel industry. Fashion schools just cover the basics, which are quickly forgotten without practice. Take the extra effort to explore these and other CAD programs beyond what fashion schools teach: read books, find online courses and tutorials. Not only will you be ready with the skills you need to succeed in the fashion industry, but discussing how you went the extra mile to keep up with apparel industry standards will definitely impress any prospective employer!

Practice, practice, practice

My suggestion is to practice flat sketching as often as you can. Make sure you learn and are really comfortable with Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop for Fashion Design – what you’ve learned in fashion school is not enough!! To acquire additional knowledge: read books, take additional courses, (offered in either classroom or online settings). Take a look at industry standard examples of flat sketches. Our Fashion Flats section contains many free downloads of flat sketches in both JPEG and vector (Illustrator) formats for your reference. If you can improve your skills to reach the quality of those shown, you’ll be in very good shape. They are free for you to use. Please download them so you can also use them as slopers to trace and basics to work from.

Educate Yourself!

Many fashion schools such as FIT in New York (Fashion Institute of Technology) offer “Flats and Specs for the Fashion Industry” courses. But believe it or not, they are not required by the curriculum; they are electives! These are some of the most important skills that fashion design students should be learning. Another good elective course is “Creative Fashion Presentation” – this skill is very handy. Sales people use CAD fashion presentations a lot as visual aids. In addition they create a good impression and convey your creativity level. If you can make outstanding fashion presentations, you’ll be asked to make them often, and believe me: it’s much more fun to make presentation boards than do fittings, send faxes, and organize showrooms.

Creating Specs in a Copycat Industry

So now we can talk about specs (garment specifications). Knowing how to spec (measure and detail) a garment is a fundamental skill for a fashion designer. Many apparel companies create their fashion spec sheets using Microsoft Excel. Although garment sizes and measurements vary from one fashion company to another, if you know the principles, you’ll be able to quickly adapt to the standards of any company. You don’t even need to know how to develop apparel specs from scratch!

As a head fashion designer, I’ve had to make decisions on what garment spec standards to use. Often I simply went to different fashion stores, and found garments with good fit and copied the basic measurements. And this isn’t a rare practice – the fashion industry is a major copycat industry: most apparel that we see hanging in the stores are knock-offs of another fashion brand, who copied the design from another design brand, and so on. There are even official terms for copied fashions! A “knockoff” is when a style is copied, and a “rub-off” is when patterns are copied. Once, while I was on a European shopping trip in London, a sales person at a store noticed I was a fashion designer collecting design ideas for an upcoming season. He mentioned that his store received a constant flow of fashion designers from American design companies such as Calvin Klein, whose designers come to knockoff their merchandise. That’s right: even top fashion design brands use knockoffs for their ready-to-wear collections.

Givenchy Fall Winter 2010/2011 Haute Couture - Veladoras: long   corseted dress hand embroidered in an open lace design in golden thread,   fine gold chain and crystals worn with a tail coat embroidered with   hand cut gold metallic sequins and crystals; Coronos: long corseted   dress embroidered with hand cut gold metallic sequins and crystals

To sum it up: in order to get a job in the fashion industry before the rest of the entry level fashion design candidates, you need to focus on refining skills that are highly demanded in the apparel industry. Become proficient in drawing flat sketches and include apparel flats in your fashion portfolio, and be extremely comfortable and knowledgeable in Illustrator and Photoshop. Check out the My Practical Skills Store, where you’ll find our ebook tutorials for Adobe IllustratorAdobe PhotoshopMicrosoft Excel, and How to Spec a Garment for the Fashion Industry. Each ebook contains easy to follow tutorials, with illustrations every step of the way. They are designed to prepare you with comprehensive industry specific skills and foundations to give your fashion design career a competitive edge.

Source: designernexus.com

Read also:

7 Comments

Filed under Agency, Apparel Production Manager, Business, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Make-Up Artist, Management, Marketing Manager, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, PR Manager, Production Pattern Maker, Sales Representative, Target Market, Technical Designer, Trends