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Emerging Fashion Trends 2011 – New England’s Biggest Fashion Show, Boston Fashion Week on the Map for Innovative Fashion Shows and Fashion Designs

Boston Fashion Week

Boston Fashion Week

The 2011 Emerging Trends, a unique fashion event committed to advancing the fashion industry’s exceptional emerging designers, will be held in Boston, MA on September 24th, 2011. This event is a dedicated effort to aid the Boston fashion community in developing its reputation known for innovation and creativity.
Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

The 2008, 2009, and 2010 Emerging Trends events demonstrated great success for participating designers and sponsors including former Project Runway contestants Jerry Tam, Maya Luz and Keith Lissner (The Fashion Show, Bravo TV). Expecting to generate 500+ attendees, we hope to further our achievements for the 2011 event. This event is an incredible opportunity for emerging designers from all over the world to showcase their designs to a variety of sponsors, buyers, press and media, as well as gain extensive exposure on the east coast.

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

The SYNERGY Events aims to provide a vehicle for promising designers to reveal their collections to an upscale audience. Attendees consist of community members interested in developing Boston Fashion Week on a larger scale, as seen in other cities such as New York and Los Angeles.

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Orental

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Oriental

Calling all fashion designers in the northeast: Boston Fashion Week is looking for a headlining designer for this year’s fourth annual Emerging Trends 2011 show. According to organizers, this event is a dedicated effort to help Boston’s fashion community develop a reputation for innovation and creativity.

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Fashion bloggers have remarked that Boston’s show in the past has been particularly helpful for getting emerging designers off the ground, offering a place for them to network and present their work to fashion industry leaders. They expect well over 500 people this year.

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Organizers of the event are looking for a headlining designer with a full line of 15 looks, and are also looking for accessory designers to collaborate with. According to their website, the starting runway package will cost you $1250 and booths are priced at $750. The runway package fee includes models, hair, makeup, video footage, and photography.

Boston Fashion Week Show

Boston Fashion Week Show

Interested in purchasing a ticket for the event, which is slated for 8pm on September 24th? Keep checking in on the Boston Fashion Week 2011 website, where ticket will be available for purchase.

You can check out some videos from previous Emerging Trends Shows below in 2010:

The Emerging Trends Fashion Show

Maria Hamilton’s and Crystal Noe (Collaborator/clothing Designer) at the Emerging Trends Fashion Show 2010 at the Park Plaza Castle in Boston, MA – created at http://animoto.com
Boston Fashion Week 2010 –  Shows & Interviews
 The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show at Boston Fashion Week
The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 1)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 2)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Rising Designs at Boston Fashion Week 2010
Boston Fashion Week 2010
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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 9 of 9 ) – Preparation is Key

What You Need to Know to Master the Interview

So all that resume and cover letter preparation paid off – you’ve scheduled an interview for that company you’re dying to work for! If you’ve been following our Leaping into Fashion articles, you should have already chosen and researched the specific market you wish to work in, and focused your cover letter, resume, and portfolio in that area. Now with just a little more preparation, you’ll be ready to present to your prospective employers how you will be a great asset to their team.

Know Your Stuff

By now, you should already have a great deal of research completed for the market, and maybe even the company you’ll be interviewing in. Pull out the information you have so far and study it thoroughly. You may find that you’ll need to gather some more to fill in areas you’ve missed. Try to become familiar with as many of the following areas as possible: company history, their current collection, price point, stores they sell to, major competitors, their target customer, design philosophy, and any current news or projects in the works.

Know Where to Look

If your meeting is with a high profile company, this information should be readily available. Found in your local library and bookstores, major resource books like Dunn & Bradstreet, Fairchild’s Market Directory of Women and Children Apparel, Menswear Blue Book, Sheldon’s Guide to Retail Stores and Resident Buying Offices, and other directories can help you gather basic company information. Infomat.com is an excellent online source with a collection of related fashion industry key players, trade events, hot topics, and market research and directories. WWD.com and http://www.StyleDispatch.com are great places to look for the latest company news. And don’t forget that most companies have their own websites, which often include a company history, design philosophy, retail locations, as well as current and previous collections, and press releases. If the company is more obscure, you may have a hard time locating this information – and that’s OK. Many job listings in WWD and other publications don’t even list the name of the company! Many times, I have faxed my resume in response to anonymous ads and didn’t find out the company name until they called me to schedule an interview! In these cases, just knowing and understanding the market you want will be all you need. If it turns out the company doesn’t fall within your desired market, you’ll know that the position isn’t right for you. And if it is within your market, then you already know the product and will have no problem talking it up!

Know What to Say

Don’t expect to enter the interview and improvise answers off the top of your head. I remember going to an interview with only a loose idea of what I wanted to say, but once I was in the “hot seat”, my nerves took over and I completely blanked on my answers! If you prepare your answers ahead of time, you can make sure that you’re nerves don’t get in the way. Make a list of interview questions you’re likely to be asked and take the time to compose your responses to them. Use what you’ve learned about yourself from the career assessments we mentioned in “Setting the Course”, to answer questions regarding strengths, weaknesses, skills, values, and long and short term goals. Also be sure to incorporate your knowledge of the market and company into your responses to demonstrate your serious interest in the company.

Below are just some of the questions you should be prepared to answer:

  • Can you tell me about yourself? / How would you describe yourself?
  • Why are you interested in this position with our company?
  • What are your greatest strengths? Weaknesses?
  • Where do you see yourself five years from now?
  • What motivates you?
  • Where do you get your inspiration?
  • What do you see in stores that you think is really great?
  • If you had to predict the next big trend for the upcoming season, what would it be?
  • I see you attended (college name), why did you choose that program? How did you like it there?
  • What accomplishments have given you the most satisfaction and why?
  • How do you work within a team environment?
  • Are you willing to work longer hours?
  • How quickly do you learn?

diane-kruger-fashion-interview-magazine-1.jpg

Make sure you’re prepared to back up your responses with specific examples, or anecdotes. All the other candidates will tell the interviewer that they are creative, organized, and detail oriented. You need to make yourself stand out by telling the interviewer about the collection of meticulously hand beaded evening gowns you presented at your senior fashion show. Describe how your knowledge and skills relate to the position and how you can contribute to the company: “My understanding of garment construction will allow me to create accurate initial specs for sample development.” Also note that it’s not enough to just write down your responses – you absolutely must practice them! Rehearse aloud, in front of a mirror, or even with a friend. Don’t skip this step! Your responses should come as second nature to you during the interview – you won’t create a good impression if you take a long time to recall your answers! All kinds of public speakers need to prepare for hours and sometimes days. I remember reading that a communication coach takes her an hour of preparation to deliver 10 min speech!

Know How to Dress

Suits usually aren’t necessary for interviews unless you think you can make it work without appearing too stiff. A trendy interview outfit can be pulled off if you know more about the company, and dress for their market. For example, if you’re interviewing with a company that specializes in career wear for women, you’ll want to dress more formally and present a polished appearance. If you’re interview is with a casual sportswear company, your outfit can be a little more relaxed, but not too casual – you are still on an interview! If you have little or no information about the company you’ll be meeting with, it’s better to dress more moderately. No matter what, your ensemble should reflect your professionalism to make a good first impression. Your outfit should be fashion forward and express who you are without overdoing it.

Master the Interview

Equipped with your killer portfolio, your knowledge of the company, and your personality, you’re prepared to enter the interview and show ‘em what you’ve got! Greet your interviewer with a firm handshake and steady eye contact. Mirroring your interviewer is a good way to gain rapport and be accepted. This doesn’t mean copy the interviewer exactly, (that would be creepy!) just subtle reflections will do. Mirror the way she or he sits; use the same tone of voice and sentence phrasing. If the interviewer asks “From where do you draw your inspiration?” You can respond “I draw most of my inspiration from…” Answer questions honestly without bragging or exaggerating. If you’re asked any questions that you don’t know the answer to – be honest and say you don’t know! For example, if you are asked how to create a vector mask in Illustrator, reply. “While I am proficient in Illustrator, masking is one area I am not yet familiar with, but I would love the opportunity to learn.” Convey to your interviewer that you know school training is very different from actual industry expectations. Employers are looking for a candidate that won’t be difficult to train, or take up too much training time. Someone who learns quickly and is willing to go the extra mile is a worthwhile candidate for the employer to hire.

Express your interest in the company, and your flexibility and eagerness to learn and develop within the field. And then, there are the no-brainers for any interview:

  • Always arrive on time, preferably 10-minutes earlier since some companies will ask you to fill out an application or additional paperwork before you meet with the interviewer.
  • Bring several copies of your resume since you may be interviewed by a team or panel.
  • Don’t discuss salary, work hours, vacation time, or benefits during a first interview unless the subject is mentioned first by the interviewer.
  • Don’t appear overzealous. Due to the competitive (sometimes backstabbing) nature of the fashion industry, some professionals are insecure and threatened by competition. You don’t want to appear like a possible contender.
  • If you are asked what your expectations are, give a range instead of a specific number and add that you are flexible. (Do your homework on what you should ask for – visit http://www.stylesalaries.com to make sure your range is reasonable with salary trend of the current market.)
  • Always ask for a business card for each person you interviewed with at the end of the meeting.

Ask Questions

At the end of the interview, you will likely be asked if you have any questions. You should always have some questions ready to further demonstrate your interest in the position. You can also use this as an opportunity to learn first-hand information about the company, or review a topic that was discussed earlier in the interview.

Some questions you may want to ask are:

  • How would you describe a typical day on the job?
  • How many people are on your design team and how is the department organized?
  • How will my job performance be evaluated, and how often?
  • What is the potential for growth and advancement within the company?
  • Where do you see the company headed in the next few years?
  • What is the next step in the interview process, and when can I expect to hear from you?

Remember that you are not the only one being interviewed. While the interviewer is trying to determine if you are the right match for the position, you should also be deciding if the company and the position are the right fit for you!

Post Interview

As soon as you get home from the interview, write a thank you note and email it to the interviewer(s). In addition to thanking the interviewer for taking the time to meet with you, you should also reaffirm how your skills and qualifications make you a good match for the position. Try building on some highlights from the interview. Always send out thank you notes right away. It’s pointless if it’s received days or weeks after the interview! Even if you are no longer interested in the position, send a thank you note anyway to thank the recruiter for their time. You always want to leave a favorable impression; you never know when you may encounter the contact in the future! Many job seekers don’t bother with thank you notes so yours will get noticed immediately.

Keep at It!

Sometimes, interviews don’t always go as well as planned. I can’t even tell you how many interviews I left thinking “I totally screwed that one up!”, or “I’m not getting that one for sure!” It happens to the best of us so don’t beat yourself up about it! Becoming comfortable with and mastering the interview process takes time and practice. The more interviews you go on the more confident you’ll become. Don’t take rejections too hard. Job-hunting is very difficult and it’s completely normal to face rejection more than once – especially within the super competitive fashion industry. It doesn’t mean that you aren’t an excellent candidate; it just means that the employer couldn’t match your skills with the needs of the company. Stay positive, and always put your best efforts into preparing for each interview, and the right position will come along in no time!

 

Source: Designernexus.com

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Gucci’s Digital Flagship: Crafting an Intensively Attentive Online Environment

On the eve of Gucci’s 90th anniversary as a luxury retailer, the firm’s CEO, Patrizio di Marco, describes why digital innovation is more than just a matter of relevance and modernity.

2681_patriziodimarco_mediumBesides being one of the most active luxury brands in the social media space – with nearly 3.2 million Facebook fans and a host of online initiatives including the live streaming of its catwalk shows and smart phone applications – Gucci is also the first luxury brand to launch a digital flagship.

“Gucci was in fact a pioneer when it launched its US e-commerce site in 2002 and we [still] believe that new media and new technologies represent a valuable complementary communication and business channel.”

“ The digital flagship is destined to become our highest volume store in the world ”

According to Di Marco, Gucci’s new online retail destination takes advantage of the most innovative technologies available today, integrating rich content, shopping and social networking to provide the site’s monthly 2.5 million unique visitors with an aesthetic and customer-oriented experience that replicates the one customers have when immersed in one of the brand’s signature flagships stores in Rome, New York, London or Shanghai.

From a strategic perspective, Gucci’s recent aggressive foray into digital media channels is a concerted effort to drive the digital flagship to outperform all brick-and-mortar store sales.

“The digital flagship is destined to become our highest volume store in the world, and should be the final destination for any search on the net: whether you are seeking out Gucci through a search engine, or are one of our 3.2 million Facebook fans, or are one of the over 840,000 people who have downloaded our Gucci App or are one of our 32,000 Twitter followers.”

While traditional luxury marketing focused on the protected environment of exclusive networks and publications, Gucci has been at the forefront of the movement which challenges the status quo by utilizing the web to expose the brand. In September of 2010, for instance, the brand invited its fans to virtually join the womenswear fashion show and even showcased the commentary and digital content of fans on a global site alongside the show’s live stream.

“One of the reasons Gucci has been successful in reaching new customers is because of the attention we have paid to the internet… The current site operates in 17 countries in 8 different languages, while e-commerce is offered in 12 countries with over 2000 skus available online.”

The brand has also integrated social media into the heart of the online shopping experience. A live Twitter feed, an interface with the Gucci official Facebook fan page and product page link to ready-to-wear items straight off the catwalk, allows visitors to truly engage with the brand.

Di Marco, together with Frida Giannini, Gucci’s creative director, have championed social networks as an integral part of the new site, suggesting they are a natural extension of the fashion shopping experience in the real world which is often shared and enjoyed with friends as well.

With such an active role in digital media, Gucci is not only using these channels as a very direct and content-rich form of outreach to tap into a broader audience but also to uncover metrics and insight on the site’s visitors in order to become a more attentive luxury brand – something which is difficult to do with customers entering brick-and-mortar stores.

“[Digital] is allowing us to develop more personal and constant relationships with current and prospective consumers. We are also able to understand the desires and attitudes of our customers more quickly and easily through the information that is available to us, which is helping us to be more responsive. Ultimately, our aim is to offer the same values and experience to an online customer or visitor as we do in our stores.”

Source: Luxurysociety.com

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Oscar de la Renta’s CEO: “why e-commerce works & how social media serves the fashion brand’s designers & merchandisers”

When the Improbable Is Also Profitable

2680_alexbolen_mediumBecause today’s luxury goods consumers are present across numerous channels, being there for them wherever they may be is a crucial aspect of business to get right, says Alex Bolen, Oscar de la Renta’s chief executive – and the man responsible for the fashion brand’s foray into e-commerce and social media.

“Our presence online has suggested to me that consumers are very quickly adjusting their behaviour to new modes of shopping and we need to really be out at the forefront of it. We have had many surprise anecdotes from having our brand online, anything from a $50,000 chinchilla coat sale through our website to completing a sale for a bridal dress via Twitter.”

For many luxury fashion brands, e-commerce has still not yet eclipsed the performance of physical stores but a very significant consumer appetite is present.

“ Our customer has taught us that there are moments where she will want to spend hours in a store shopping and there are moments where it’s a quick impulsive purchase ”

“When we first began thinking about e-commerce three to four years ago I was very sceptical that our brand would not fare well as, at that time, we were not particularly optimized in products that don’t have size requirements. Our bread and butter product is a $4 – 5,000 cocktail dress which is very fit intensive, in fact the perfectly fitted garment is an important part of our brand and this is something that seemed to me didn’t jive well with an online shopping experience.”

“I was wrong about that. Surprisingly we have had a very good reaction to our fit intensive products online. What we found in retrospect is that customers will order two different sizes and keep one of them.”

“Our customer has taught us that there are moments where she will want to spend hours in a store shopping and there are moments where it’s a quick impulsive purchase – as a luxury brand it’s important to us that we are present wherever our customer is.”

According to Bolen, e-commerce currently drives only 10% of the luxury fashion brand but it is growing very quickly. In a relatively short period of time, he forecasts Oscardelarenta.com to become the brand’s most prolific door.

One of the ways that the brand is extending its outreach to drive customers back to the site is through social media. Oscar de la Renta has taken a very creative approach to emerging media platforms such as creating a unique online personality for the brand on Twitter called OscarPRgirl. The brand uses Twitter as a channel to provide unique insight into the world of Oscar de la Renta and to engage with entirely new audiences as well supporting the interests of existing ones.

“We want to broaden our array of services to our customers as much as possible and services include consuming content. Everyone who goes to Oscardelarenta.com is a potential shopper – maybe they are a shopper today maybe they are a shopper in six months. As a brand we need to figure out a way to engage them and we need to offer services for wherever that person may stand on the potential customer spectrum.”“As a brand, we want to augment the initiatives online started by OscarPRgirl and speak more about what we are doing by explaining what our brand is about in more than just 140 characters. This means we want to extend our communications to areas such as rich video content and audio content.”

For a luxury brand like Oscar de la Renta, social media is proving to be much more than just a PR tool but one that is feeding business insights about the brand back to the company. “For Oscar de la Renta, social media has provided us with information on what our customers think, what they need, what they want and what they expect of us. From our jewellery offerings, accessories, scarves, etc. we have made many merchandising choices [and] many design choices based on feedback we got online.”“I am a big believer that you have to listen to your customers, and the online world has given us a new way to listen to our customers and we have learned to position ourselves based on what we hear.”

Source: Luxurysociety.com

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Backstage with Hair Stylist Ted Gibson at Vena Cava 2011 Fashion Show

Each season you can count on spotting fashions elite at the Vena Cava show andspring 2011 was no exception. Elle’s senior fashion editor Kate Lanphear and Bergdorf Goodman’s Linda Fargo were front row and center in support of industry darlings Sophie Buhai and Lisa Maycock, the creative duo behind-the-line. Back for a second season was hair heavy weight Ted Gibson and his team of stylists from the Ted Gibson Salon New York, who we caught up with backstage.
“I’m excited to work with Sophie and Lisa again. This season the inspiration came from an old Vogue that embodied that 70s Halston chic look,” said Gibson, who is also the lead hairstylist on TLC’s ‘What Not to Wear.’ It was the return of the turban this past spring and Gibson remakes the look a bit hipper and more youthful for spring 11 by not covering the hair entirely, but just framing the crown. The hair was first texturized than pulled back into sleek chignon and finished with a bandeaus scarf. This is the perfect look to rock at the beach by day. Then mix it up by removing the scarf for a poolside pulled-back, polished evening style.
To get this look at home you’ll need to:
Prep hair with Ted Gibson Build It ($19.19, beauty.com). This product will give your hair volume and texture when blow drying. Next, take a dime size drop of Ted Gibson Tame It ($19.19, beauty.com) and work it throughout the stands to help tame frizzies while you finger-comb your hair into low ponytail. Once hair is secured into a ponytail twist it up into the bun style of your choose. Try wearing a silk scarf with a pop of color in red if you’re hair is deep dark color to have the full va-va-voom effect

Source: Bvhairtalk.com

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Understanding how your Customers Think

John Zogby on how business owners can use polling to better understand their customers.

How can polling be helpful for small businesses?

The era of seat-of-your-pants decision-making is gone. I’m willing to accept the fact that there are some people who just have great instincts, but here is a powerful tool – opinion research, polling – that can either underscore or defy seat-of-the-pants thinking. And so, if it’s available and it’s scientific, you use it.

What can small business owners use it for?

What is your market, and what does your market want? How much are they willing to spend? Customer satisfaction: Are you doing a good job or a bad job? The work we’ve done over the years suggests there are two things you’re looking at when you’re doing customer satisfaction. You’re looking for score: good job, bad job. But among the clients that say bad or so-so job — why.

What’s one of the secrets to getting the most out of polling and opinion research?

We’ve done customer satisfaction for banks, for retailers. You can get a 95% [positive-experience] score either overall or in some specific item. But then when you ask why among the 5%, if there’s one person who says, “it was the worst experience of my life, I’ll never go back there again,” you have to know. You have to find that out. And you only find that out if you ask.

Most polling is done by telephone, but the Do-Not-Call Registry limits business owners when considering this venue for its polls. How do you suggest business owners reach their customers?

You find that even in this era of the Do-Not-Call Registry and people working an average of 50 to 60 hours a week, there are still people willing to answer questions [on the telephone]. But interactive services is one of fastest growing [areas of polling], and very useful and accurate.

Each methodology offers something that another methodology doesn’t. The telephone, for starts: We ask our people, don’t just give us the yes/no, agree/disagree, the scale 1-5 — tell me what the tone was. On the telephone, you can get the real attitude, the real tone. E-mail allows you to ask more questions in more detail.

Are there areas where polling works better than others, or those that don’t work at all?

Always, customer satisfaction. But also, if you’re going to do it yourself, you’re not going to get accurate information. Why is that? Because sometimes people don’t want to tell the actual vendor. They’ll tell us. Sometimes they don’t want to tell about a bad experience – you know, do unto others as you’d do unto you.

Can a business be too small and polling irrelevant to them?

No.

Source: Inc.com By Laura Rich

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Burberry Interactive AW10 Campaign

Introducing the all British Burberry Autumn/Winter 2010 campaign cast, actor Douglas Booth, musicians Gwilym Gold, Rory Cottam, Samuel Fry, Seb Brice, and models Rosie Huntington-Whiteley, Nina Porter, Sam Rollinson, Charlotte Wiggins, Caspar Smyth, and Thomas Penfound.

Interact with the campaign at http://www.Burberry.com

The CAST:

Interview:

Christopher Bailey, speaks from the Burberry Autumn/Winter 2010 Ad Campaign set at Pinewood Studios in London.

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