Category Archives: Magazines

Addicted to Style & Fashion?? These is an App for that!!..

Looking for a great fashion app? Happy Downloading!!

 

NY Magazine recently named their favorite fashion-centric apps to see which ones are worth your precious downloading time!  Below are their top ten picks for the iPhone.

shopstyle mobile Fashion App

shopstyle mobile Fashion App

ShopStyle: Mobile 
This site’s stylish and intuitive spinoff app aggregates clothing and accessories from more than 100 e-commerce sites (Asos, Bluefly, and Neiman Marcus among them). Poke around indiscriminately or filter by category, keyword, brand, store, price, color, size, and sale. If you fall in love, the site forwards you to an online retailer. The free app is best for those who don’t really know what they want (“a white dress … maybe sleeveless … ideally under $200″) and would like to cast a wide net to see what’s out there. Download it here!

Chicfeed Fashion App

Chicfeed Fashion App

Chicfeed
This bare-bones app pulls photos from some of the Internet’s most respected style blogs, including the SartorialistFace Hunter, and Lookbook. The sorting functionality — or lack thereof — leaves something to be desired, but if you’re just seeking quick-hit eye candy, there’s no better way to see loads of style snaps all in one spot. The app is available two ways: free with advertising or 99 cents without. Download it here!

DVF - Diane Von Furstenberg mobile fashion app

DVF - Diane Von Furstenberg mobile fashion app

Diane Von Furstenberg
While many designers with apps remain skeptical about mobile commerce, Von Furstenberg told W, “We already do so many things from our phones, so shopping is a natural progression.” Accordingly, DVF’s app allows users to shop via a “Looks We Love” section or by thumbing through the collections — albeit not 24/7. (Our nighttime request to purchase a one-shoulder floral dress wasn’t addressed until regular business hours.) Still, DVF gets props for rounding out the app with Facebook-sharing capabilities and access to her Twitter feed. Download it here!

GAP StyleMixer Mobile Fashion App

GAP StyleMixer Mobile Fashion App

Gap StyleMixer
This innovative brand app allows you to mix and match Gap items with pieces already hanging in your closet. Create outfits using uploaded photos or use the “Mixer” to browse Gap products and create head-to-toe new looks. Shake your phone and the Mixer will generate a random combination of pieces, including shoes and accessories. The “Community” function allows you to share your uploaded looks, as well as check out combos other app users are creating. On the downside, if you’re near a Gap location, you can also supposedly “unlock” a special promotion on your phone; we tried, but were lamely told to “check back soon for a new offer.” Download it here!

Glamour Ask a Stylist Mobile Fashion App

Glamour Ask a Stylist Mobile Fashion App

Glamour Ask a Stylist
Wang or Wu? Jeggings or jorts? Dr. Scholl’s with socks or without? These are the types of pressing sartorial questions one might bounce off a trusted friend — or one of Glamour’s on-call app stylists. Here’s how it works: Browse their mini-bios (some are from glamour.com, others from Craigslist), choose the one most up your aesthetic alley, upload your outfit pic and/or inquiry, and wait. Our selected stylist responded to our day-to-night dilemma fifteen minutes after we fired off our request. And, in true women’s-mag fashion, we were given an extra boost of confidence (“You’ll look awesome wherever you go!”). A solid bet for the indecisive. Download it here!

iShoes Mobile Fashion App

iShoes Mobile Fashion App

iShoes
Scroll through more than 50,000 kicks in the shoe-porn Finder, or search the sea of shoes by style and designer. The app indicates which pairs are on sale and connects you straight to buy-it-now retailers. The app is free, functional, and offers decent-size closeups of each item, though we hope its creators introduce better browsing filters (like color, size, heel height, material, etc.) with the next update. Download it here!

Lucky at your Service Mobile Fashion App

Lucky at your Service Mobile Fashion App

Lucky at Your Service
This free app uses GPS, e-commerce, and flesh-and-blood staffers to hunt down editor-approved clothing, shoes, accessories, and beauty products. Once you’ve settled on that to-die-for Nanette Lepore dress, the app will direct you to an online retailer, and in select cases, a store within 50 miles (typing in a Manhattan Zip Code netted results within the five boroughs, as well as White Plains, New Jersey, and Long Island) that stocks it. If you’re game for an in-person pickup, tell the app your desired size and color, and the Lucky ”concierge team” will call the store to see if it’s available (regular business hours apply). If it is, they’ll even ask the store to set it aside for same-day pickup. The app was super-buggy when it first debuted and is still slow, but it’s the closest us proletarians may ever get to having a personal assistant. Download it here!

Lustr Fashion Finder Mobile App

Lustr Fashion Finder Mobile App

Lustr Fashion Finder
Get off the G train in a new ‘hood and want to kill time at a men’s business accessories trunk show within walking distance of where you are? This impressive sales and promo finder shows you exactly what’s happening in real time near you, and draws up a list of upcoming events and promotions searchable by distance, neighborhood, and time remaining before sale end. Navigate sales based on your location and specify down to the type of product you’re looking for (accessories, beauty products, shoes, etc.), the occasion for which you’re shopping (working out, getting married, etc.), or the style you’re going for (edgy, preppy, etc.). You can even create an itinerary and score exclusive-to-Lustr deals. Download it here!

Style.Com Mobile Fashion App By Condé Nast Digital

Style.Com Mobile Fashion App By Condé Nast Digital

Style.com
Instead of downloading a bunch of individual designer apps, peruse this hub of major ready-to-wear and couture collections (including menswear), dating back several years. The free app features runway videos beamed to your iPhone hours after the collections debut, as well as show reviews and photos of every look. Supplemental features include international party-scene coverage and access to the site’s Style File blog. The app occasionally stalls and crashes, but it’s thoroughly comprehensive and easy to use. Download it here!

StyleBook Mobile Fashion App

StyleBook Mobile Fashion App

Stylebook 
Like most wardrobe-organizing apps, Stylebook ($3.99) lets you upload photos from your closet, tag and categorize everything you own, plan out what you’ll wear in the coming month, and track how many times you’ve worn each piece. But unlike the others, it allows you to move, assemble, and resize pieces from your wardrobe right on the screen, layering outfits to see exactly how they might look. The biggest drawback was the app’s inability to edit out the background from uploaded photos — your best bet is to use the “manual erase” function, or just Photoshop it out yourself before uploading. All in all, Cher Horowitz would be pleased. Download it here!

 

 

Source: blog.scad.edu

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Emerging Fashion Trends 2011 – New England’s Biggest Fashion Show, Boston Fashion Week on the Map for Innovative Fashion Shows and Fashion Designs

Boston Fashion Week

Boston Fashion Week

The 2011 Emerging Trends, a unique fashion event committed to advancing the fashion industry’s exceptional emerging designers, will be held in Boston, MA on September 24th, 2011. This event is a dedicated effort to aid the Boston fashion community in developing its reputation known for innovation and creativity.
Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

The 2008, 2009, and 2010 Emerging Trends events demonstrated great success for participating designers and sponsors including former Project Runway contestants Jerry Tam, Maya Luz and Keith Lissner (The Fashion Show, Bravo TV). Expecting to generate 500+ attendees, we hope to further our achievements for the 2011 event. This event is an incredible opportunity for emerging designers from all over the world to showcase their designs to a variety of sponsors, buyers, press and media, as well as gain extensive exposure on the east coast.

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

The SYNERGY Events aims to provide a vehicle for promising designers to reveal their collections to an upscale audience. Attendees consist of community members interested in developing Boston Fashion Week on a larger scale, as seen in other cities such as New York and Los Angeles.

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Orental

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Oriental

Calling all fashion designers in the northeast: Boston Fashion Week is looking for a headlining designer for this year’s fourth annual Emerging Trends 2011 show. According to organizers, this event is a dedicated effort to help Boston’s fashion community develop a reputation for innovation and creativity.

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Fashion bloggers have remarked that Boston’s show in the past has been particularly helpful for getting emerging designers off the ground, offering a place for them to network and present their work to fashion industry leaders. They expect well over 500 people this year.

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Organizers of the event are looking for a headlining designer with a full line of 15 looks, and are also looking for accessory designers to collaborate with. According to their website, the starting runway package will cost you $1250 and booths are priced at $750. The runway package fee includes models, hair, makeup, video footage, and photography.

Boston Fashion Week Show

Boston Fashion Week Show

Interested in purchasing a ticket for the event, which is slated for 8pm on September 24th? Keep checking in on the Boston Fashion Week 2011 website, where ticket will be available for purchase.

You can check out some videos from previous Emerging Trends Shows below in 2010:

The Emerging Trends Fashion Show

Maria Hamilton’s and Crystal Noe (Collaborator/clothing Designer) at the Emerging Trends Fashion Show 2010 at the Park Plaza Castle in Boston, MA – created at http://animoto.com
Boston Fashion Week 2010 –  Shows & Interviews
 The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show at Boston Fashion Week
The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 1)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 2)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Rising Designs at Boston Fashion Week 2010
Boston Fashion Week 2010

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 2 ) – Fashion Industry Career Specializations

Fashion Industry Career Specializations -BREAK IT DOWN

Coming straight from fashion school, you might be thinking that as a fashion designer, you’ll have the opportunity to work with all types of apparel. But what you may not know is that generally, the fashion industry is split into categories, and then categories within categories. Basically, the apparel industry is very specialized.
The breakdown begins with price (which usually corresponds with quality). The lowest apparel classification is Discount, and at the height of fashion is Haute Couture:
  • Discount Fashion: These stores sell fashion merchandise that retails at a discounted price from what other apparel stores charge. Outlet malls or stores like Ross, Walmart, Target, or Conway are example of discount retailers that sell discount labels.

  • Budget / Mass Market Fashion: Mass market apparel usually consists of knock offs of higher priced designer fashions that are sold at low competitive prices to the masses. Old Navy, Forever 21, and Charlotte Russe are a few popular budget apparel labels. Department stores in this category include JC Penney, and Kohl’s. This fashion market usually retails for less than $100.

  • Moderate Fashion: These include nationally advertised apparel fashion brands such as Nine West, Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Express, and Zara. Examples of moderate department stores are Macy’s and Dillards. These apparel brands typically retail for less than $300.

  • Contemporary Fashion: More than just a specific price point, this classification is a fashion-forward image often aimed at women in their ’20s and early ’30s looking for trendy fashions priced more affordably than Designer pieces. BCBG, Betsey Johnson, Bebe, and Rebecca Taylor fall into the Contemporary fashion category, which usually retails for under $500.

  • Better Fashion: Also selling for less than $500, these collections use better quality fabric and styling than lower-priced brands. Armani Exchange, Jones New York and Anne Klein are a few examples of better-priced apparel lines.

  • Bridge Fashion: Priced under $1,000, these apparel fashion lines serve as a “bridge” between better and designer fashion categories. Bridge fashion includes names like Ellen Tracy, Dana Buchman, DKNY, Emporio Armani, and Lauren by Ralph Lauren.

  • Designer Fashion: True fashion designer collections typically sell for more than $1,000 per item. The fabrics, fit, details, and trims are superior to other ready-to-wear items. Some examples of designer labels are Gucci, Prada, Versace, Armani, and Chanel.

  • Haute Couture / Avant-garde Fashion: Also know as couture, these terms have been commonly misused by ready-to-wear brands. Haute Couture, or simply “couture” fashion designers sell custom, made-to-measure apparel, which costs tens of thousands of dollars, and is affordable only to a select few. Technically speaking, there are only ten official Haute Couture Fashion Houses including: Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Chanel, and Givenchy. Avant-garde fashion designers produce high quality, one-of-a-kind garments that experiment with new fashion design concepts and push the envelope of popular apparel design.

Even within the fashion industry categories listed above, each apparel market is broken down into more specific career specializations. First, fashion companies are broken down by customer: men’s, women’s, children’s etc. Then are further divided by type of apparel: sportswear, eveningwear (special occasion), sleepwear etc. And then even fashion design teams are designated to specific areas like Wovens, Knits, Sweaters, Tops, Bottoms, Dresses, Outerwear and so on.

A discouraging thing to note about the fashion industry is that it is very difficult to move from one career category to another. If you start building your fashion design career with mass-market apparel companies, you’re going to face some barriers when you apply for that dream fashion designer job at Ralph Lauren. The same goes for apparel design specialties. If you’re experienced in designing children’s woven tops, chances are you won’t land a position designing women’s dresses. If you’re absolutely determined on making a switch in the fashion industry, you’re best bet is to start from the bottom in your desired career field and work your way up again.

Something else to consider is the different types of apparel manufacturers and retailers out there. There are fashion manufacturers who design and produce their own apparel designs, which are then sold to fashion retailers. These manufacturers do not have their own retail fashion stores. Examples include Shoshanna, Jones New York and Carmen Marc Valvo. There are also fashion manufacturers that own licenses for a variety of brands. For example, at the time of this writing, Phillips Van Heusen (PVH) owns Calvin Klein and IZOD, but licenses brands like DKNY, Sean Jean, and Kenneth Cole.

Then, there are fashion retailers that only sell merchandise purchased from manufacturers. These include stores like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. There are also many manufacturers that also have their own fashion retail locations such as Polo Ralph Lauren, Armani Exchange and Nicole Miller. Other apparel retail stores have their own product development teams and have merchandise manufactured specifically for their private label designs such as Gap, Old Navy, and Express. In addition to purchasing merchandise from outside manufacturers, many department stores also have their own private label collections. Examples are: I.N.C. (Macy’s), and Arizona Jeans (JC Penney).

Pre-Fall 2011

The largest employment opportunities out there lie within mass-market apparel companies. They often pay rather well to begin with, however these figures usually level off after a few years of experience. The higher-end fashion markets pay less to start, and work hours are longer, but the prestige you’ll receive from such reputable companies will do wonders for your resume.

Source: Desigernexus.com

 

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Four Powerful Strategies For How Luxury Brands Should Use Social Media

Luxury brands have a specific challenge in using social media: the need to retain the aura of exclusivity around their brands even as they embrace the inclusive, accessible nature of social media.

Here’s the solution: luxury brands should use social media in a manner that awareness of the brand’s promise is accessible while achievement of the brand’s promise is exclusive.

Here are four powerful strategies for how luxury brands should use social media to become accessible to fans but still remain exclusive for customers –

Luxury Brands Social Media

 

The four strategies are positioned along the accessibility-exclusivity continuum

1. Create awards, magazines and communities to interpret luxury lifestyle, fashion and design with your brand’s unique lens. Examples include LMVH NownessThierre Mugler WomanityD&G SwideWyndham Resorts Women on Their WayBMW Mini Space and Rolex Awards.

2. Leverage your brand’s desirability to create sharable digital artifacts. Examples include the Godiva virtual gift shop on Facebook and Hermes ties posters on Facebook.

3. Bring together designers, artists and customers to share how they interpret your brand. Examples include Burberry Art of the TrenchMac Artist TweetsCoach Design a Tote Contest and Sheraton Resorts Better When Shared.

4. Create a private invite-only social network like A Small World to underline your brand’s exclusivity. Examples include the Generation Benz community.

For more, do read (and share) our comprehensive guide to how luxury brands should use social media to become accessible to fans but still remain exclusive for customers.

Source: Thesocialcustomer.com

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Fashion 2.0: Magazines Capitalise on Shopable Content

Jennifer Aniston by Steven Klein | Source: W MagazineJennifer Aniston by Steven Klein | Source: W Magazine

In recent seasons, fashion brands have learnt to think like publishers, creating original digital content to earn attention and attract fans who will carry their message across the internet. But the reverse is also true: squeezed by shrinking advertising budgets, traditional content creators like magazines are learning to think like retailers, embracing e-commerce to open new revenue streams and monetise their content.

Click here to find out more!“Publishers are the number one generators of purchasing intent for brands every day, but are being allocated an ever shrinking amount of ad dollars,” said Philippe von Borries, co-founder and publisher of popular fashion website Refinery29.com.

Indeed, “intent generators” like magazines are losing their fair share of sales revenue to “intent harvesters” like shopping sites at the end of the purchasing process, observes internet entrepreneur Chris Dixon in an insightful blog post entitled “A Massive Misallocation of Online Advertising Dollars.”

Mr. Dixon suggests that better techniques for tracking how publishers generate purchase intent could lead to a more favorable allocation of advertising dollars, allowing content sites to focus purely on producing content. But many magazines are hedging their bets, becoming both “intent generators” and “intent harvesters” by launching their own online shops and integrating them into their editorial platforms.

Click here to find out more!

SHOPPING CHANNELS

Time Inc’s key fashion title InStyle first launched InStyle Shopping back in 2007, letting consumers browse and buy an edited array of products from retailers like Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Bergdorf Goodman, and earning the magazine a share of the sales revenue. According to Simeen Mohsen, InStyle’s director of digital business operations, InStyle Shopping has “moved more than $10 million in product since launch.”

While InStyle declined to quantify exactly what this number means in terms of revenue for the magazine, other online publications and blogs earn 8 to 12 percent on clicks that lead to successful sales via affiliate programmes. Even if InStyle only earned about half as much  — say 5 percent — this would translate to $500 thousand in revenue since 2007.

The Business of Fashion

But ShopStyle, the social shopping engine that has powered InStyle Shopping since launch, states on their website: “The rate you are paid per click depends on a number of factors, including how often clicks result in sales for the retailer, the amount of each sale, and whether those products are returned for a refund. As a result, the rate you are paid can vary over time.”

Building on the success of InStyle Shopping, Time Inc. recently made a strategic move to deepen the integration of e-commerce across InStyle.com. In January, the publisher acquired StyleFeeder, a personal shopping engine that uses pattern recognition technology to make product recommendations. StyleFeeder is expected to be woven throughout InStyle’s website and replace the current partnership with ShopStyle. Speaking to the Wall Street Journal, Fran Hauser, head of digital strategy for the group that manages InStyle, explained: “Our editors are generating significant consumer demand for products in the retail market. And what StyleFeeder allows us to do is share in that value creation.”

Vogue iPad App Contents Vogue Brings Out Its First iPad App

InStyle isn’t the only magazine that’s been integrating e-commerce into its offering. Last November, Condé Nast’s Lucky magazine added online shopping to its editorial platform, bringing intent generation and intent harvesting together in one destination. “We felt strongly that we wanted to weave the eboutique into Luckymag.com rather than create a separate ecommerce site,” said Mary Gail Pezzimenti, Lucky magazine’s web director. “We believe that women want to shop alongside great fashion how-to advice, styling videos, fashion news and galleries of great outfits or hairstyles.”

Independent fashion titles have also been experimenting with e-commerce. Last Autumn, AnOther Magazine launched AnOther Shop, an online boutique with specially commissioned merchandise, from artworks by Jake and Dinos Chapman to laptop cases by Gareth Pugh. Then, a couple of months later, AnOther Magazine launched AnOther Loves, a product recommendation engine that sits alongside, but separate from AnOther Shop. It’s a bit like a collective blog, with product picks crowdsourced from a carefully selected list of contributors. “We wanted to turn this collection of desirable goods into a collaborative stream, and with a little semantics have realised this could be very useful for recommendations,” said Alistair Allan, digital director at Dazed Group which publishes AnOther.

CURATED COMMERCE

Magazine brands are also positioning themselves to generate and harvest purchase intent beyond their websites. During London Fashion Week in February, AnOther Loves teamed up with London department store Liberty on an initiative called AnOther Loves Liberty, a curated selection of Liberty products that appeared on AnOther Loves, as well as on Liberty’s website and at their Tudor-style flagship.

Partnerships with sample sale sites have also been popular. Lucky has teamed up with Net-a-Porter’s online outlet, theOutnet.com, to host flash sales curated by Lucky editors, Hachette Filipacchi’s Elle magazine has a deal with Rue La La and Vogue is partnering with Gilt Groupe to let consumers shop select products from the current issue.

SHOPABLE ADVERTISING

A few weeks ago, Vogue also launched an iPhone app designed to make the magazine’s advertising shopable. Called Vogue Stylist, the app is loaded with styling advice and monthly trends supplied by Vogue editors, alongside products advertised in the magazine, which consumers can browse, mix and match with items uploaded from their own closet, and ultimately click to buy. “Vogue Stylist pairs a user’s wardrobe with products from Vogue advertisers to produce a look that is both chic and new,” said Holly Tedesco, integrated marketing director at Vogue. Using the camera built into the iPhone, the app even allows readers to scan and shop physical ad pages in Vogue’s print issue.

FULL INTEGRATION

But some magazines are going beyond branded shopping channels, curated e-commerce partnerships and shopable advertising. They are integrating e-commerce directly into their center-of-book editorial. This month, W magazine launched a shopping guide alongside images of covergirl Jennifer Aniston, with numbered bullets — and links to external shopping sites — that correspond to the clothing Ms. Aniston wears. Indeed, the integrated shopping guides appear in all of W’s fashion spreads for April.

If this kind of deep integration of commerce and core editorial content appears to pose an inherent conflict of interest, it’s worth remembering that at fashion magazines, these lines have long been blurred. Across the industry, the products featured in editorial are often a function of a magazine’s advertisers.

Furthermore, in the real lives of fashion consumers, magazines and shopping are already integrated. People have used magazines as inspirational product guides since their very inception, a behaviour that’s even easier now that editorial sites and online shops are just a click or tab away from each other. So why shouldn’t publishers offer shopping services that streamline the process for consumers and capture a share of the sales revenue that’s rightfully theirs?

That’s not to say that an independent stylistic point of view is not important. It’s tremendously important. It’s what attracts readers in the first place. Going forward, the most successful magazines will be those who are able to maintain their unique point of view, while capitalising on content that’s shopable. A contradiction? Not necessarily. A challenge? Definitely.

“Over the next few months we will be launching several new commerce products,” said von Borries of Refinery29. “We firmly believe that commerce should be an integral element of a digital content site that features new fashion products, trends and designers every hour. Commerce and community also belong together. Whoever does not embrace the two will lose out in the long run.”

Indeed, people love to shop, but even more than that, they love to shop together. While forward-thinking youth apparel brands like Vans have experimented with realtime social shopping, letting users share the experience of customising shoes, we’ve yet to see a content site that lets readers explore and shop fashion together, in realtime.

Source: Businessoffashion.com by Vikram Alexei Kansara is Managing Editor of The Business of Fashion

 

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Kingfisher Steamy Hot Swimsuit Calendar 2011

The Seventh edition of the international award-winning limited edition KINGFISHER swimsuitcalendar shot by ace photographer Atul Kasbekar.

Kingfisher Calendar 2011

JANUARY- New Beginnings

Kingfisher Calendar girl 2011 Angela Jonsson heralds a new beginning as the world steps into a New Year amidst the beautiful landscape of Mauritius.

February - the month of love

FEBRUARY – The Month of Love

Lisa Haydon welcomes the Sun in yogic style as the winter gets ready to say a goodbye. With the blue waters of Mauritius and a matching sky, the summer gets ready to make a perfect entry.

March - summer's here

MARCH – Summer’s here

As summer steps in, a splash of water is a welcome relief, so says Anjali Lavania.

April - the first showers

APRIL  The first showers

When the King of Fruits steps in, the summer peaks. Fiona Thomas lolls on the white stands in a mango-orange swimsuit.

May - time to holiday

MAY – Time to Holiday

Hot and sultry Lisa Haydon sizzles on sun-kissed Mauritius shores.

June - wet days ahead

JUNE – Wet days ahead

Cherlotte Lohmann waits for the monsoon with all eagerness.

July - the rains in full fury

JULY – The rains in full fury

Ahh.. the monsoon breeze is soothing. Kingfisher Calendar Girl 2011 Angela Jonsson ambles on the sands in an aquamarine blue bikini.

August - here come the festivals

AUGUST – Here comes the Festivals

The end of monsoon makes the season an ideal time to wander. Cherlotte Lohmann saunters around with the big cats.

September - goodbye rains

SEPTEMBER – Goodbye rains

Amidst dunes, the month is ready for a fresh beginning. Anjali Lavania signals the arrival of September with a splash of colours.

October - changeover time

OCTOBER – Changeover time

A season when life springs to action. Lisa Haydon sets the ramp on fire.

November - winter's here

NOVEMBER – Winter’s here

Lisa Golden on a fast lane with a couple of Cheetahs as the world gets ready to welcome another year.

December - cold days ahead

DECEMBER – Cold days ahead

With the winter all set to come in, a bit of sunshine works magic on the body. Lisa Haydon says it in style.

Source: India Syndicate

Image credits: Atul Kasbekar

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Gucci Ad Campaign 2011

Gucci takes you on a new journey for Spring 2011 with the new ad campaign – along with models Nikola Jovanovic and Raquel Zimmermann shot by Mert & Marcus.

Gucci Cruise Ad Campaign 2011 6Gucci Cruise Ad Campaign 2011 5Gucci Cruise Ad Campaign 2011 4Gucci Cruise Ad Campaign 2011 3Gucci Cruise Ad Campaign 2011 2Gucci Cruise Ad Campaign 2011 1

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