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Addicted to Style & Fashion?? These is an App for that!!..

Looking for a great fashion app? Happy Downloading!!

 

NY Magazine recently named their favorite fashion-centric apps to see which ones are worth your precious downloading time!  Below are their top ten picks for the iPhone.

shopstyle mobile Fashion App

shopstyle mobile Fashion App

ShopStyle: Mobile 
This site’s stylish and intuitive spinoff app aggregates clothing and accessories from more than 100 e-commerce sites (Asos, Bluefly, and Neiman Marcus among them). Poke around indiscriminately or filter by category, keyword, brand, store, price, color, size, and sale. If you fall in love, the site forwards you to an online retailer. The free app is best for those who don’t really know what they want (“a white dress … maybe sleeveless … ideally under $200″) and would like to cast a wide net to see what’s out there. Download it here!

Chicfeed Fashion App

Chicfeed Fashion App

Chicfeed
This bare-bones app pulls photos from some of the Internet’s most respected style blogs, including the SartorialistFace Hunter, and Lookbook. The sorting functionality — or lack thereof — leaves something to be desired, but if you’re just seeking quick-hit eye candy, there’s no better way to see loads of style snaps all in one spot. The app is available two ways: free with advertising or 99 cents without. Download it here!

DVF - Diane Von Furstenberg mobile fashion app

DVF - Diane Von Furstenberg mobile fashion app

Diane Von Furstenberg
While many designers with apps remain skeptical about mobile commerce, Von Furstenberg told W, “We already do so many things from our phones, so shopping is a natural progression.” Accordingly, DVF’s app allows users to shop via a “Looks We Love” section or by thumbing through the collections — albeit not 24/7. (Our nighttime request to purchase a one-shoulder floral dress wasn’t addressed until regular business hours.) Still, DVF gets props for rounding out the app with Facebook-sharing capabilities and access to her Twitter feed. Download it here!

GAP StyleMixer Mobile Fashion App

GAP StyleMixer Mobile Fashion App

Gap StyleMixer
This innovative brand app allows you to mix and match Gap items with pieces already hanging in your closet. Create outfits using uploaded photos or use the “Mixer” to browse Gap products and create head-to-toe new looks. Shake your phone and the Mixer will generate a random combination of pieces, including shoes and accessories. The “Community” function allows you to share your uploaded looks, as well as check out combos other app users are creating. On the downside, if you’re near a Gap location, you can also supposedly “unlock” a special promotion on your phone; we tried, but were lamely told to “check back soon for a new offer.” Download it here!

Glamour Ask a Stylist Mobile Fashion App

Glamour Ask a Stylist Mobile Fashion App

Glamour Ask a Stylist
Wang or Wu? Jeggings or jorts? Dr. Scholl’s with socks or without? These are the types of pressing sartorial questions one might bounce off a trusted friend — or one of Glamour’s on-call app stylists. Here’s how it works: Browse their mini-bios (some are from glamour.com, others from Craigslist), choose the one most up your aesthetic alley, upload your outfit pic and/or inquiry, and wait. Our selected stylist responded to our day-to-night dilemma fifteen minutes after we fired off our request. And, in true women’s-mag fashion, we were given an extra boost of confidence (“You’ll look awesome wherever you go!”). A solid bet for the indecisive. Download it here!

iShoes Mobile Fashion App

iShoes Mobile Fashion App

iShoes
Scroll through more than 50,000 kicks in the shoe-porn Finder, or search the sea of shoes by style and designer. The app indicates which pairs are on sale and connects you straight to buy-it-now retailers. The app is free, functional, and offers decent-size closeups of each item, though we hope its creators introduce better browsing filters (like color, size, heel height, material, etc.) with the next update. Download it here!

Lucky at your Service Mobile Fashion App

Lucky at your Service Mobile Fashion App

Lucky at Your Service
This free app uses GPS, e-commerce, and flesh-and-blood staffers to hunt down editor-approved clothing, shoes, accessories, and beauty products. Once you’ve settled on that to-die-for Nanette Lepore dress, the app will direct you to an online retailer, and in select cases, a store within 50 miles (typing in a Manhattan Zip Code netted results within the five boroughs, as well as White Plains, New Jersey, and Long Island) that stocks it. If you’re game for an in-person pickup, tell the app your desired size and color, and the Lucky ”concierge team” will call the store to see if it’s available (regular business hours apply). If it is, they’ll even ask the store to set it aside for same-day pickup. The app was super-buggy when it first debuted and is still slow, but it’s the closest us proletarians may ever get to having a personal assistant. Download it here!

Lustr Fashion Finder Mobile App

Lustr Fashion Finder Mobile App

Lustr Fashion Finder
Get off the G train in a new ‘hood and want to kill time at a men’s business accessories trunk show within walking distance of where you are? This impressive sales and promo finder shows you exactly what’s happening in real time near you, and draws up a list of upcoming events and promotions searchable by distance, neighborhood, and time remaining before sale end. Navigate sales based on your location and specify down to the type of product you’re looking for (accessories, beauty products, shoes, etc.), the occasion for which you’re shopping (working out, getting married, etc.), or the style you’re going for (edgy, preppy, etc.). You can even create an itinerary and score exclusive-to-Lustr deals. Download it here!

Style.Com Mobile Fashion App By Condé Nast Digital

Style.Com Mobile Fashion App By Condé Nast Digital

Style.com
Instead of downloading a bunch of individual designer apps, peruse this hub of major ready-to-wear and couture collections (including menswear), dating back several years. The free app features runway videos beamed to your iPhone hours after the collections debut, as well as show reviews and photos of every look. Supplemental features include international party-scene coverage and access to the site’s Style File blog. The app occasionally stalls and crashes, but it’s thoroughly comprehensive and easy to use. Download it here!

StyleBook Mobile Fashion App

StyleBook Mobile Fashion App

Stylebook 
Like most wardrobe-organizing apps, Stylebook ($3.99) lets you upload photos from your closet, tag and categorize everything you own, plan out what you’ll wear in the coming month, and track how many times you’ve worn each piece. But unlike the others, it allows you to move, assemble, and resize pieces from your wardrobe right on the screen, layering outfits to see exactly how they might look. The biggest drawback was the app’s inability to edit out the background from uploaded photos — your best bet is to use the “manual erase” function, or just Photoshop it out yourself before uploading. All in all, Cher Horowitz would be pleased. Download it here!

 

 

Source: blog.scad.edu

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Emerging Fashion Trends 2011 – New England’s Biggest Fashion Show, Boston Fashion Week on the Map for Innovative Fashion Shows and Fashion Designs

Boston Fashion Week

Boston Fashion Week

The 2011 Emerging Trends, a unique fashion event committed to advancing the fashion industry’s exceptional emerging designers, will be held in Boston, MA on September 24th, 2011. This event is a dedicated effort to aid the Boston fashion community in developing its reputation known for innovation and creativity.
Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

Boston Fashion Week Sponsors 2010

The 2008, 2009, and 2010 Emerging Trends events demonstrated great success for participating designers and sponsors including former Project Runway contestants Jerry Tam, Maya Luz and Keith Lissner (The Fashion Show, Bravo TV). Expecting to generate 500+ attendees, we hope to further our achievements for the 2011 event. This event is an incredible opportunity for emerging designers from all over the world to showcase their designs to a variety of sponsors, buyers, press and media, as well as gain extensive exposure on the east coast.

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

Boston Fashion Week Show Bride

The SYNERGY Events aims to provide a vehicle for promising designers to reveal their collections to an upscale audience. Attendees consist of community members interested in developing Boston Fashion Week on a larger scale, as seen in other cities such as New York and Los Angeles.

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Orental

Boston Fashion Week Show Mandarin Oriental

Calling all fashion designers in the northeast: Boston Fashion Week is looking for a headlining designer for this year’s fourth annual Emerging Trends 2011 show. According to organizers, this event is a dedicated effort to help Boston’s fashion community develop a reputation for innovation and creativity.

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Boston Fashion Week Innovative Design

Fashion bloggers have remarked that Boston’s show in the past has been particularly helpful for getting emerging designers off the ground, offering a place for them to network and present their work to fashion industry leaders. They expect well over 500 people this year.

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Boston Fashion Week Show Lingerie La Perla

Organizers of the event are looking for a headlining designer with a full line of 15 looks, and are also looking for accessory designers to collaborate with. According to their website, the starting runway package will cost you $1250 and booths are priced at $750. The runway package fee includes models, hair, makeup, video footage, and photography.

Boston Fashion Week Show

Boston Fashion Week Show

Interested in purchasing a ticket for the event, which is slated for 8pm on September 24th? Keep checking in on the Boston Fashion Week 2011 website, where ticket will be available for purchase.

You can check out some videos from previous Emerging Trends Shows below in 2010:

The Emerging Trends Fashion Show

Maria Hamilton’s and Crystal Noe (Collaborator/clothing Designer) at the Emerging Trends Fashion Show 2010 at the Park Plaza Castle in Boston, MA – created at http://animoto.com
Boston Fashion Week 2010 –  Shows & Interviews
 The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show at Boston Fashion Week
The Emerging Trends 2010 – Runway Show
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 1)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Falling Into Fashion: Boston Fashion Week 2010 (Part 2)
WEBN had the inside scoop at this year’s Boston Fashion Week. Executive Producer: Kayla Harrity
Rising Designs at Boston Fashion Week 2010
Boston Fashion Week 2010

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Fantasy Hairstyling, Pushing the Limits! – Hair Battle Spectacular

 

Fantasy hair is all about pushing the limits of traditional hairstyling. It can include the use of clothing, ornaments, and props to achieve the desired look, and it’s almost always pulled to the top of the head. Fantasy hair competition — which has been around for decades — pits contestants against each other to create a total look of hair, makeup, and clothing in a limited amount of time.


Hosted by actress Brooke Burns, this competition series pits 10 of America’s hottest stylists against each other to see who can deliver the biggest and best in fantasy hair design.

Part sculpture and part pop art, each challenge requires contestants to create outrageous coifs that resemble everything from multi-layer wedding cakes to toys with moveable pieces. The stylists then enter the ring to present their hair creations in a fully produced, dramatic and stylized performance. After each challenge, the judges — award-winning fantasy hair designer Derek J, celebrity stylist Lindsay Albanese and a rotating guest judge — critique the designers on creativity, execution and overall presentation.

 

In addition to blow-by-blow drama in the arena, there is also the day-to-day drama between the cohabitating stylists who fight each week to stay in the game and win the ultimate prize of $100,000.

“Hair Battle Spectacular” is produced by 3 Ball Productions with JD Roth, Todd Nelson, Adam Greener, and Mike Nichols serving as executive producers.

 

Source: hair-battle-spectacular.oxygen.com

 

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Dressing with Sense and Simplicity: Organic Fabric and Clothing

No one would like to eat a bowl of pesticides drenched food. Then why wear clothing doused in chemicals?

Centuries before people use to live in harmony with nature and believed in giving even better environment for their coming generations. Now, people have crossed all limits dominated by the voracity of luxuries, benefits and money. This is taking a serious toll on the environment, and on the lives of all living beings in the planet.

The ‘Chemical Cocktail’ of Clothing:

When considering a healthy lifestyle, fabric is the first thing that comes to mind. Synthetic fabrics’ teeming with chemicals and dyes pose severe health threats. Synthetic fibers makes the skin uncomfortable due to the presence of toxins in them. From towels to bed linens, and clothes they are all-pervading in our everyday life. Apart from the potential health hazards to humans, these synthetic fibers also leach into the environment causing serious damages to soil, air, ground water, and other living beings around us.

The Environment Shield Organization of US has declared that seven out of the top fifteen pesticides are used for growing conventional cotton, and are regarded as the most environment polluting pesticides. On the contrary, organic cotton is cultivated using untreated GMO seeds, and by adopting biological based growing practices. A beneficial habitat planting method is adopted which prevents pests, thereby eliminating the usage of toxic chemicals.

stewartbrown 02 Room101 | Organic Fashion Design Pioneer Howard Brown

Natural Dyes Vs Synthetic Dyes:

Synthetic dyes involve many carcinogenic chemicals and effluents that are discharged into the river or atmosphere causing pollution. Chemicals used on fabrics can contain allergens, carcinogens and mutagens. Dyes that are used for special effects on textiles such as flame retardant, stain resistant etc., are likely to create health problems. Natural dyes are obtained from renewable sources, and are good to skin. They are bio-degradable and eco-friendly. Natural dyes are enriched with medicinal and curative properties, and impart healing qualities to the wearer of the fabric dyed with them. They save energy as they are not made from petroleum products. Furthermore, they provide rural employment, and also preserve traditional craftsmanship.

Life with natural fibers’:

Acrylic, polyester, nylon, rayon, triacetate, acetate and other fabrics labeled as stain & wrinkle resistant, and moth repellent will have ample amount of chemicals in their making. These fabrics can be avoided, and replaced with natural fabrics like wool, silk, cotton, linen, cashmere, and hemp. Organic and herbal clothing is more preferable for people who are very sensitive to chemicals. Researches on people with multiple chemical sensitivities reveal that organic clothing is essential in reducing their exposure to toxic chemicals.

 

Source: fibre2fashion.com

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 5 ) – Fulfilling Your Vision

Becoming Your Own Fashion Designer

I know some of you may have been disappointed by the realities we exposed in our “How to Become a Fashion Designer” article series. Our apologies, but we had to destroy the bliss of naivety to spare you from many rude awakenings when you start your fashion career! That being said, I’m sure there are also some of you who are determined to become that ideal vision of a fashion designer: create your own label, design your own fashion lines, runway fashion show and the whole nine. We commend your ambitiousness and of course, we are here to help! Here’s our suggested approach to become your own fashion designer.

Learn the Fashion Biz

First thing’s first, and we’ve all heard it a million times: Fashion is first and foremost a business. Yes it’s true – you could have the best apparel collection in the world, but if you don’t have the business savvy to manage your fashion design operations or market yourself; you’re in for a rough and disappointing journey in the fashion industry. Countless talented fashion designers try creating an apparel line without the proper business foundation to support them. Issac Mizrahi, and Narciso Rodriguez are just a few well-known fashion designers whose fashion careers were almost destroyed by their lack of business knowledge.

We highly recommend educating yourself and taking business courses- either in school or on your own. Really get to know the fashion industry. However, if for some reason you prefer not to, you should at the very least seek a knowledgeable (and trustworthy) business partner to handle that end for you.

Finding a Niche

Concerning the actual apparel designs, if you want to make your mark and get noticed in the fashion industry, you have to make sure your apparel designs stand out amongst the swarm of pretty outfits already crowding the runways. If your vision for your collection is just to design “pretty” clothes, the chances of your work getting noticed are like finding a needle in a haystack! The cliché word of advice is to design for a niche market. But what does that mean?

A Cause for Design

Here’s our take on finding a niche: find a cause, and design for that cause. Choose something that you’re passionate about, or pick a theme and design for that theme. Create a trademark that you will become known for. Betsey Johnson is known for her funky, outrageous, one-of-a-kind garments that reflect her quirky personality. Diesel created their highly functional, hardware driven signature style from the construction worker lifestyle. When apparel designs are consistently focused around a specific element or concept, they will receive more attention and that concept will become your design signature. Once your fashion line is established and well known, you can always expand. And whatever you decide on, make sure it’s something you believe in; something you are passionate about. When your fashion designs come from the heart, it shows, and you’re inspiration will be endless.

Get Your Name Out There!

So once you’ve selected your cause and designed an extraordinary apparel collection around it, how do you make sure your fashion designs get publicity? Fortunately, modern technology makes promoting yourself a much easier task. There are tons of venues that showcase emerging fashion designers such as nolcha.com and haute.net (See the Independent and Underground Fashion at our Resource Center for more links). There you will find underground designer showcases that give beginner designers their own venue space. You bring the designs – they bring in the crowds.

In the past few years, an underground fashion revolution has emerged, creating a shift in the apparel industry. Consumers are tired of apparel fashion clothing that is dictated by an elite few fashion designers, and have begun searching for more unique, down to earth sources for their apparel & fashion needs. New waves of fashion designers are discovered in unconventional places and recognized for their individual fashion design styles. Educating yourself, knowing the business, designing for a cause you love, and promoting yourself through new avenues are all steps in the right direction towards having the fashion design career you’ve always envisioned!

Source: Designernexus.com

 

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 4 ) – Learning the Fashion Lingo of the Fashion Industry !

Fashion Industry Terminology That May Come Up in an Interview

When it’s time for that big job interview, don’t get thrown off-guard when an interviewer uses a fashion industry term you don’t know. Make sure you’re familiar with the common apparel industry terms listed below. You might even try using some yourself to really impress!


Fashion Illustrations: Used most often in fashion design portfolios, these stylized fashion figure drawings are what most people think of when talking about “fashion design”. While fashion schools focus heavily on fashion illustrations, they are rarely used by designers in the apparel industry. Despite this, fashion illustrations are still used in fashion design portfolios, because they demonstrate a fashion designer’s sketching skills and individuality, adding a “wow” factor to their presentation.

Mood Board: Used often in fashion portfolio layouts, the mood board is placed at the beginning of each design group and contains images, fabric swatches, trims, and other findings, which express the mood, inspiration and color story for the collection of apparel designs that follow.

Flats: Flat sketches, better known in the fashion industry as “flats”, are black and white fashion sketches that show a garment as if it were laid “flat” to display all seams, hardware, and any other design details. While they can be drawn by hand, nowadays fashion flats are usually sketched using computer software such as Adobe Illustrator. Always included in design packages and tech packs, they serve as an important reference for patternmakers, merchandisers, as well as production and sales teams, and manufacturers. Flats are an absolute must in every apparel design room.


Line Sheet: A line sheet is a reference guide used by salespeople and buyers when discussing and presenting am apparel collection to buyers. Typically, several garment styles are listed on one page and the following information is included for each style: a black and white flat sketch, style number, season, price, delivery date / order cut-off date, color, and fabric information. They usually contain actual fabric swatches as well.

CADs: Fashion CADs, (Computer Aided Designs) are computerized, color rendered, flat sketches that simulate the appearance of an actual garment. As a basic rule of thumb, the more realistic the CAD sketch is – the better. CAD sketches are often used as visual aids during sales presentations, and can serve as a sample substitute when an actual sample is not yet available. They are often sent to buyers for visual references.

Presentation Boards: Most fashion presentation boards are simply CADs, except they are presented in a nicer layout. Usually including fabric swatches or artwork, they are preferred by most sales people for presentations. Even when real samples are available, they add variety to an already existing style.

Specs: Sample specifications or “specs” are garment measurements and details that are included in design packages and tech packs. Many apparel specs are shown along with fashion flat sketches, and are important to sample development.

Tech Pack: Also known as design packages, tech packs are vital to the garment production process. Usually they contain fully detailed fashion flats and specs, topstitching and hardware details, any necessary artwork layouts, and basically any other information required to produce a sample garment. Tech packs are sent to factories to make apparel samples for approval.

Fits: Fits, or garment fittings, is the process of making sure a sample garment meets all necessary measurement and detail specifications to achieve the desired fit. Conducted by technical designers, the apparel fitting process involves measuring a sample garment, checking all hardware, topstitching and details, and communicating any necessary comments or revisions with factories.

Grades / Grading: When the fit of a sample garment is approved, a size grade will be sent to the factories to begin production. A size grade is a chart containing measurements for the ordered size range of an approved style.

Color Card: The specific color themes used in each season’s fashion line are chosen from color forecasting services. Color cards are then assembled for fashion presentations, combining forecasted colors with standard popular selling colors.

Yarn Dyed: Fabric that is woven with yarns that were dyed before weaving. Most good quality fabrics are yarn dyed.

Piece Dyed: Fabric that is dyed in a vat by the bolt (full piece) after it is woven.

Lab-dips: Lab dips are conducted by factories to provide a visual aid of how a color will look when it is dyed. Since the lab dip is produced in a beaker and is not an actual production run, the actual production sample will vary from the lab dip that is provided. When the goods are dyed in a real production run, the conditions are dramatically different from the laboratory. Production does not begin on fabric unless a lab dip is approved or the customer waives the lab dip process.

Textile Design: Quite often in the apparel industry, fashion designers are involved in the process of creating textile designes, which is artwork for prints, plaids, or stripes to be used in fabric development and production.

Strike-off: A test sample of printed fabric made to show and verify color and pattern before entering into production on larger quantities.

Pitch Sheet: A pitch sheet shows a full repeat of a textile design and contains samples of the individual colors included in that print. Pitch sheets are used by factories to produce strike-offs for approval.

Source: Designernexus.com

Read also:

  • Fulfilling Your Vision ( Part 5 ):
    Becoming Your Own Fashion Designer
  • Put Together ( Part 6 ):
    What to Include in Your Fashion Portfolio
  • Setting the Course ( Part 7 ):
    Developing an Action Plan for Your Fashion Career
  • Look Good on Paper ( Part 8 ):
    Writing a Fashion Resume and Cover Letter that will Get You in the Door
  • Preparation is the Key ( Part 9 ):
    Preparing for, and Mastering the Interview

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Agent Provocateur Bikinis & Swimsuits 2011

Tatum Swimsuit

Sexy 60’s style swimsuit with sleek moulded cups for incredible cleavage. The clever belt around the middle gives the illusion of a smaller waist, creating a beautiful hour glass silhouette. Stand out from the crowd in this striking cut-out swimsuit. Price: €265

Amylee Bikini

Sexy 50’s style knotted bikini top, created in our unique AP travel print. This pretty pin-up inspired bikini top is underwired to offer great support and fabulous shape. This versatile bikini features detachable straps and can be worn in either a halter neck or strapless style. Price: €145

Cheeky tie-side bikini bottoms created in our special AP travel print. Decorated with over-sized bows, these low slung bottoms help elongate the legs whilst giving great, sexy coverage. Price: €110

Tatum Bikini

Sexy 60’s style bikini top with sleek moulded cups for a streamlined silhouette. This stylish bikini bra features chic gold ring detailing, and gives great shape and support for all sizes. Price: €130

Sleek low rise bikini brief with chic gold rings at each side.  This sexy, Brazilian style brief cuts high across the derriere, creating a flirty and seductive look. This itsy bitsy cerise Brazilian brief is sure to turn heads. Price: €75

Candy Bikini

This cute, pin-up style bikini top is underwired and foam lined to give amazing support and lift. Created in kitsch spotted sateen swimwear fabric, this adorable bikini features a white broderie anglaise frill with a red and white striped bow at the centre front. This versatile bikini can be worn with or without the removable straps. Price: €145
Pretty low rise brief created in kitsch black and white spotted sateen swimwear fabric. These cute bikini briefs feature a playful white broderie anglaise frill and a red and white striped bow at the centre front. Price: €90

Risa Bikini

This gorgeous plunge line bikini bra features soft black swimwear fabric with classic AP pink stitching. Gold look branded buttons and clasp decorate this curve-creating bikini top. Sexy shaped cups create incredible cleavage. Price: €145

Low slung bikini brief for a flattering and sexy look. Featuring soft black swimwear fabric and classic AP pink stitching, these shortie style briefs are adorned with gold look branded buttons. Be daring and wear these cheeky shorts style briefs with a sheer white shirt. Price: €90

Zahra Swimsuit

Cleverly constructed, this boned swimsuit creates a mouth watering silhouette!  The corset-tie front allows for all sizes, whilst the sumptuous satin fabric enhances and flatters the shape.  A flash of red satin and the collar style cups add a stylish modern touch, whilst the handy zip back assists ease of wear. Price: €635

Source: Agentprovocateur.com by Susann Byman Ruud

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Fashion Week Spring 2011: The Shoes

The Hot Shoes of Spring

The shoes are sexy, but the walking is treacherous.

Both on and off the runway, shoes were turning heads —and possibly a few ankles—at the Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week’s Spring 2011 shows .

Whatever the style—be it a gladiator sandal, a platform wedge, or a stacked heel—there was a common theme: extreme height. So much so that more than a few women were spotted having to slip off their heels and slip on another shoe in order to navigate New York’s streets, especially in the cobble-stoned Meatpacking District where some fashion shows took place.

Walking on the Wild Side

The shoe excitement wasn’t confined to the runways. Plenty of fans turned out for the shows sporting shoes worthy of the spotlight. This pair of shoes worn by spectator Comora Roberson highlights the popular animal print trend for the spring. Roberson says she likes the print because she’s “not a black or a brown shoe girl.”

“I love them,” Roberson said. “You can’t really walk with them.”

A View From the Front Row

The shoes were particularly eye-catching in the front row. One example were the heels Julianne Moore wore to the Reed Krakoff Spring 2011 fashion show on Sept. 15. These were from Krakoff’s fall collection. For spring, he has a new version, this time made with boar hair.

High Fashion for The Masses

The designs at Fashion Week continue to become more accessible for fans. Collective Brands’ Payless ShoeSource has partnered with designers to bring high fashion to the masses. Christian Siriano, the designer who won the fourth season of the reality show Project Runway, is one of them.

Siriano’s spring collection drew on inspiration from India, China, and Africa. His shoes included heels that were almost architectural in their design. Pictured here is an example from his show at The Stage at Lincoln Center on Sept. 9, 2010, with a “chop-stick”-inspired wood heel with an electroplate finish.

Stacked

Designer Lela Rose also is working with Payless. Her shoe designs are named after streets in Lima, Peru. This striated wedge heel is “Loreto,” which the designer says was inspired by the city’s hillside landscape.

Other designers at fashion week were also showing stacked heels for spring.

Spring’s Pale Palette

Another common trend for spring are neutral colors. Here’s an example of an open-toed bootie that was shown at Nicole Miller’s show on Sept. 10 at 82 Mercer.

Would Michelle Wear These?

These metallic heels are a great pairing with the heavily beaded designs of Naeem Khan, who is known for his ultra-embellished gowns and cocktail dresses that have been worn by celebrities including Beyonce Knowles, Carrie Underwood, and First Lady Michelle Obama.

A Pop of Color

A model walks the runway wearing a teal, T-strap sandal at Naeem Khan’s show at the Stage in Lincoln Center on Sept. 16.

Vases and Amazons

The shoe styles were very exciting at Vassilios Kostetsos Spring 2011 fashion show at The Studio at Lincoln Center on Sept. 12.

The silver metallic color of this pair contrasted nicely with the gold and blue hues that dominated his collection. Kostetsos drew inspiration for his clothes from Greek ceramic vases and the ancient Amazon culture.

Defying Gravity?

Some of the shoes are beautiful to look at, but seem to defy the laws of physics. Here’s a particularly high heel worn by actress Gillian Jacobs as she walked around Lincoln Center.

L.A.M.B Roars Like a Lion

Award-winning musician and vocalist Gwen Stefani continues to wow with her sense of style. There’s a lot of buzz about this spring’s L.A.M.B. collection.

Here a model walks down the runway at the L.A.M.B. show at the Theater at Lincoln Center on Sept. 16, 2010.

Backstage at DvF

Speaking of shoes, “Sex and the City” star Sarah Jessica Parker stepped out several times at Fashion Week wearing head-turning footwear. Here’s a close-up of the shoes she wore to Diane von Furstenberg’s spring debut at the Theater at Lincoln Center on Sept. 12.

Source: CNBC.com

By Christina Cheddar-Berk


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Fashion Designer Career Information

Fashion Designers Overview

Fashion designers with a 2-year degree or 4-year degree in fashion design who are knowledgeable in fashion trends, fabric, and textiles are what employers are looking for. Due to the creativity and glamour of the job, there is a lot of competition to become a fashion designer. Most jobs for fashion designers are in California and New York.

Nature of the Work for Fashion Designers

Fashion Designers
Fashion designers study fashion trends, sketch designs of clothing and accessories, select colors and fabrics, and oversee the final production of their designs in order to produce clothing items and accessories that consumers want to purchase. Fashion designers can work in men’s, women’s, and children’s apparel, including intimate apparel and maternity wear.


Many fashion designers specialize in clothing, footwear or accessories but some enjoy creating designs for all three. Between 18 and 24 months, fashion designers begin their design process and turn it into a final production. A fashion designer’s first step is to research trends in current fashion and to predict the trends that will follow. Whether they use trend reports or do their own research, fashion designers rely on the research to indicate what styles, colors, and fabrics will be popular in the upcoming season.

Trend reports and research are also important to textile manufacturers who use the information to begin designing patterns and fabric simultaneously with the fashion designer who is sketching the design. Once a fashion designer’s sketch is complete, the fashion designer and manufacturer meet to discuss fabric and pattern choices.

A prototype is created once the design and fabric are agreed upon which uses cheaper materials as a model to make any necessary adjustments.

Once a fashion designer make a decision, article samples are made and distributed to clothing retailers. Fashion designers can also see their design at fashion and trade shows throughout the year.

Though many fashion designers sketch by hand, many use computer-aided design (CAD) to translate the sketches into the computer where fashion designers can view their designs on virtual models.

The involvement of a fashion designer depends on the size of the design firm and experience. For large design firms, fashion designers usually take on the role as lead designer who create designs, choose colors and fabric and oversee the technical designers responsible for turning the idea into a final product. Large firms may also employ their own pattern makers and tailors as well. For fashion designers working in smaller firms, a bulk of their work includes overseeing technical aspects, pattern making, and sewing. Some fashion designers choose to work for apparel wholesalers or manufacturers. This involves fashion designers to design for the masses where designs come in various colors and sizes.

Many fashion designers are also self-employed and design for individual clients as well as those who sell their designs to retail or specialty stores. Fashion designers in costume design for motion picture, performing arts or television productions perform extensive research on certain styles and eras and then draw sketches, select fabrics and oversee production. They may also be restricted to a costume budget.

Fashion designers employed by manufacturing establishments, wholesalers, or design firms will usually work normal and regular hours while those who freelance can either work by job or under a contract. Freelance fashion designers can work long hours in smaller environments where pressure is intense from clients. Whether fashion designers work in large firms, small firms, or freelance, long hours will occasionally be necessary for all fashion designer who have to meet deadlines or prepare for fashion shows.

Communication is essential for fashion designers who are constantly dealing with suppliers, customers and manufactures.

Fashion designers may also need to travel for fashion shows or to get fabric.

Training, Other Qualifications and Advancement for Fashion Designers

A fashion designer typically needs an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree in fashion design in order to find employment. Fashion designers who may be thinking about running their own business or store may also combine a fashion design degree with a business,marketing, or fashion merchandising degree. Typical courses for an associate or bachelor’s degree in fashion design includes color, textiles, sewing and tailoring, pattern making, fashion history and computer-aided design (CAD). Taking courses in human anatomy, mathematics, and psychology can also be useful for understanding the body and how to run a company.

Around 300 postsecondary institutions with programs in art and design are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Most schools expect a basic art or design course to be completed before formal admittance into a program is allowed. Sketches may also be requested before admittance.

Interning, working at manufacturing firms, working at retail stores or with a personal stylist can help fashion designers learn the necessary skills of the industry.

Those who want to become successful fashion designers can also enter their designs into amateur or student contents.

Fashion designers must have a strong aesthetic, good communication skills, be able to problem solve and sketch. A good portfolio is also important for an aspiring fashion designer to have. The ability to work well in teams is also important for fashion designers who will remain in contact with manufacturers, supplies, and buyers.

Though design is a big part of becoming a fashion designer, they must also be knowledgeable in pattern making and sewing. Knowledge of these skills will make it easier for fashion designers to instruct others on how garments should be constructed.

Those starting out as fashion designers usually begin as sketching assistants for pattern markers. After working for an experienced designer, fashion designers may be able to advance to such positions as design department head or chief designer.

Some fashion designers also go on to start their own business or begin selling their designs to stores.

Top 10 Most Popular Fashion / Apparel Schools

1. Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, New York)
2. The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising – Los Angeles (Los Angeles, California)
3. The New School (New York, New York)
4. Academy of Art University (San Francisco, California)
5. International Academy of Design and Technology (Multiple Campus Locations)
6. Iowa State University (Ames, Iowa)
7. Katharine Gibbs School – New York City (New York, New York)
8. Savannah College of Art and Design (Savannah, Georgia)
9. The Illinois Institute of Art – Chicago (Chicago, Illinois)
10. Virginia Commonwealth University – Richmond (Richmond, Virginia)

See All Fashion/Apparel Design Schools

Online School: The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division

Employment and Job Outlook for Fashion Designers

Number of People in Profession

15,780

Changing Employment (2008-2018)

Employment is projected to little or no change (decrease or increase by 2%).

Job Opportunities & Competition

May face, or can expect, keen competition for job opportunities. Job openings may be fewer than job seekers.

About 15,780 jobs are held by fashion designers, 31 percent work for apparel, piece goods, and wholesalers while 13 percent work for apparel manufacturers.

With a high demand for clothing, footwear, and accessories, some new jobs may open for fashion designers. Middle-income consumers are demanding affordable yet stylish clothing which means fashion designers will be needed in apparel wholesalers.

Since most apparel manufacturing is done overseas, cut and sew manufacturing jobs will likely decline.

Design firms that design mass-market clothing in department stores and retail stores will offer the most job opportunities for fashion designers.

Earnings and Salary for Fashion Designers

Median annual wages for salaried fashion designers are $64,260. The middle 50 percent earn between $44,110 and $90,020. The lowest 10 percent earn less than $32,320, and the highest 10 percent earn more than $130,900.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook

Source: Campusexplorer.com

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Hair and make-up trends for 2011 from ‘Down Under’

What will be the big hair and make-up trends this year?

FACING FACTS:

Perth make-up artist Yvette Gray says bright colours should be your beauty staple for 2011.

“Looking at what was on the catwalk at New York Fashion Week, there is a lot of citrus and coral on the eyes,” she says.

“Those colours need to be paired with nude lips and cheeks, otherwise the look is way too much.

“There were also a lot of pale white or soft nude eyes, generally teamed up with cantaloupe and watermelon tones on the lips.”

We will also see a new take on the classic smoky eye this year.

“It is always a strong look that never dates but it will be modernised for 2011 by adding a metallic finish to the eye,” Ms Gray says.

“It’s a great evening look.”

Napoleon Perdis national creative team leader Kate Squires says green is also emerging as a key trend.

“The arresting shade evokes so many things – from money to Mother Nature – but, for us, green shadow and liner on the eyes is also undeniably glamorous, especially when paired with glowing skin, contoured cheeks and pinkish lips,” Ms Squires says.

Ms Squires says it is important not to get so caught up with colour that you forget the basics.

“No make-up technique or look is complete without the perfect base and a lot of women still find this hard to achieve,” she says.

“It’s all in the priming. As Napoleon would say ‘not to prime is a crime’.”

MAC senior artist Nicole Thompson says glossy skin texture will be pivotal in the coming seasons.

“We are seeing much less of a heavy foundation look,” she says.

“It is becoming more and more popular – and generally looks much more flattering – when you can actually see your skin through your make-up. This is especially true if you want to play with the bright colour trend.

“Keep the rest of your make-up really pared back and natural to keep the look modern and not trashy.”

Ms Thompson suggests wiping make-up off your eyelids and cheekbones to reveal your natural skin colour and adding gloss accents to the high points of the face.

HAIR TODAY:

Toni & Guy national educator and Subiaco salon owner Tracey Laing says the hottest hair trend for 2011 is the bold, graphic cut.

“Those shapes have got a bit of a power chic attitude, and they’re a bit edgy,” she says.

Ms Laing says classic shapes like the bob will be modernised with bold fringes, a lot of texture and layers.

“Rather than thinking Courtney Love, though, this look will be a lot more finished,” she says.

“It’s a lot more glamorous and high fashion while still being a bit more disordered and textured.”

2011 Hairstyles ImageBalayage was a big trend last year but Ms Laing says 2011 will be all about colour to complement the cut.

“There won’t be one dominant colour,” she says. “The key will be fresh, expensive and glamorous-looking colour that has good tone to it.

“The look we’re seeing is moving towards glossy, healthy colours.”

We’ll be seeing more voluminous hair on the streets and she predicts the topknot will definitely carry into the new year.

“It does suit most face shapes and ages,” she says.

NAILING IT:

Celebrity manicurist Ali Veras, who has shaped the nails of Cate Blanchett, Nicole Kidman and Kylie Minogue, says nails will be bright and playful in 2011.

“Bright and bold shades of turquoise, tomato red, fuchsia and coral are all the rage this season and will make fingers and toes pop,” she says.

“I am really loving Zoya’s new Flash summer collection, which includes the perfect turquoise cream, a vivid tangerine and a cherry red.”

You don’t necessarily have to use the same polish on your toes and fingers, she says.

“Many of my clients like a more neutral or pale shade on their nails and take a more anything goes approach to their toes.”

Text Source: au.news.yahoo.com

 

If you like to view more articles on Hairstyles, visit also:

  1. STYLISH MEDIUM LENGHT HAIRSTYLES
  2. 2011 HAIR TRENDS – HAIRSTYLES FOR WOMEN and
  3. ALTERNATIVE HAIR SHOW 2011

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