Tag Archives: Ad Campaign

How Brands are using Instagram to Connect with Consumers

A picture is worth a thousand words, which may explain why Instagram has become the latest social network to catch the attention of brands. With over 1 million registered users, this photo sharing app provides a unique touch point for brands to engage their consumers while telling their story through pictures.

For those who are unfamiliar, Instagram is an easy to use iPhone application for taking, editing and sharing photos. As a user you have the ability to follow, comment and like other pictures. All these interactions make Instagram an ideal outlet for brands who are looking to explore new ways to reach their consumers. Already, nearly a dozen brands have created their own accounts, including MTV, Pepsi and even Playboy.

Instagram has been only too happy to accommodate this new interest from brands, and they have hinted that they’re currently working on changes which will allow brands to communicate more directly with users. One such change, which was rolled out last month is the launch of hash tags.

Hash tags can now be added to pictures via the caption or comment field. These tags help to aggregate pictures into their own special albums. This allows users to view a real time feed of content, based around a particular topic (similar to how hash tags work within Twitter). To view pictures associated with a hash tag tap on the tag text or use the new search functionality located under the profile tab. For those without a smart phone, pictures can be viewed via RSS feeds: http://instagr.am/tags/%5Bhashtag%5D/feed/recent.rss. Simply replace “hashtag” with the name of the tag.

Brands have been quick to take advantage of this new development. Brisk Ice Tea is using the hash tag #briskpics to collect photos, the best of which they will use to create 4000 limited edition cans. Charity: Water are asking people to use the tag #chatirywater to share images of water in their everyday life, while NPR is collecting user generated content using the tags #love and #hate to spark conversation.

So how can your brand use Instagram to reach consumers? Here are a few ideas to get you going:

1. Host a contest. Provide followers with a challenge to take a picture of something related to your brand. Alternatively you could provide the picture and ask viewers to come up with a unique caption. Best picture/caption wins.

2. Give a sneak peak. Whether it’s the first look at a new product or a few snaps behind the scenes, treat your followers to some exclusive content.

3. Create a real time album for an event. Allow attendees to share their event experiences by using a hash tag to aggregate pictures. This will provide you with a variety of content.

4. Connect with influencers. Check to see if your brand is already being talked about. Not only could this give you a hint as to the kinds of content consumers would like to see, but hash tags provide an easy way to track the people who are already connecting with your brand.

5. Show off a different side. Curate images that represent your brand personality. Connect with consumers by creating content around your shared passions rather than just your products.

Are you using Instagram for your brand? Have any other tips or best practices? Tell us below!

Original Source: Antleragency.com by Beth Tucker

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ETAM Spring / Summer 2011 by Natalia Vodianova


Jasnuary in Paris, supermodel Natalia Vodianova presented her second collection for French lingerie line Etam at the Grand Palais, with a VIP guest list including Kate Moss, Alexa Chung, Eva Herzigova, Micky GreenMario Testino, and performance by Beth Dito & The Kills. Here is the look book images (& video).

 

Natalia Vodianova signed a three-year deal back in 2009 to design the ‘Natalia pour Etam‘ lingerie, swimwear and clothing collections for the French brand, as well as fronting the campaigns

BONUS:
Behind the scene of Etam Lookbook

BONUS #2

A glimpse of last night Runway video

Source: Trendland.com By Cyril Style

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Finding a Niche: Make your Business Plans Stand Out

Trying to tackle a wide market is usually too broad of a scope for any but the largest companies to handle. As a smaller business, it’s often a better strategy to try to divide potential demand for offerings into manageable market niches. Small operations can then offer specialized goods and services that are attractive to a specific group of prospective buyers.

Trying to tackle a wide market is usually too broad of a scope for any but the largest companies to handle. As a smaller business, it’s often a better strategy to try to divide potential demand for offerings into manageable market niches. Small operations can then offer specialized goods and services that are attractive to a specific group of prospective buyers.

 

There are undoubtedly some particular products or services that you will be especially suited to provide. Study the market carefully and you will find opportunities. For example, surgical instruments used to be sold in bulk to both small medical practices and large hospitals. One firm realized that the smaller practices often disposed of instruments because they could not afford to sterilize them after each use like hospitals did. The firm’s sales representatives talked to surgeons and hospital workers to learn what would be more suitable for them. Based on this information, the company developed disposable instruments which could be sold in larger quantities at a lower cost. Another firm capitalized on the fact that hospital operating rooms must carefully count the instruments used before and after surgery. This firm met that particular need by packaging their instruments in pre-counted, customized sets for different forms of surgery.

To research your own company’s niche, consider conducting a market survey with potential customers to uncover untapped needs. During your research process, also identify the areas in which your competitors are already firmly situated. Put this information into a table or a graph to illustrate where an opening might exist for your product or service. Your goal should be to try to find the right configuration of products, services, quality, and price that will ensure the least direct competition. Unfortunately, there is no universal method for making these comparisons effectively. Not only will the desired attributes vary from industry to industry, but there is also an element of creativity that is needed. For example, only someone who had already thought of developing pre-packaged surgical instruments could use a survey to determine whether or not a market actually existed for them.

If you do find a new niche market, make sure that this niche doesn’t conflict with your overall business plan. For example, a small bakery that makes cookies by hand cannot go after a market for inexpensive, mass-produced cookies, regardless of the demand.

Source: SBA.gov

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Case Study – how market research supports the new product development process

Market research is the process by which businesses find out about customers’ needs, wants and desires. It makes possible the successful development of new products.

This study shows how an international company, Beiersdorf, combines market research with new product development on its NIVEA Deodorant brand to provide exciting new products that better meet consumer requirements.

Beiersdorf has a clear goal – to be as close as possible to consumers, regardless of which country they live in. Developing superior consumer insights is fundamental to the continued future success of Beiersdorf and its international brands like NIVEA, Eucerin and Atrixo. These are the result of more than 120 years of experience in research and development.

Beiersdorf has launched many new brands and products into a variety of countries and categories. Being an innovation leader has allowed Beiersdorf actively to shape its markets and set new trends. These product launches have led to long-term global growth.

THE KEY STAGES OF MARKET RESEARCH AND NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

Market research involves the systematic gathering, recording and analyzing of data about customers, competitors and the market. This links marketers to consumers by supplying essential information to solve marketing challenges and help with marketing decisions.

Market research helps a company create and develop an up-to-date and relevant portfolio of products.

Creating new products

Beiersdorf’s international Market Research team is based at company headquarters in Hamburg, Germany. The team’s objective is to be the voice of the consumers within the organisation. High-quality market research has helped secure the long-term future of the business. Analysing and understanding the data gathered on consumers’ behaviours, needs, attitudes and opinions minimises the risks involved in making marketing decisions.

Market research in a global organisation needs the help and support of the company’s overseas affiliate companies. Most affiliate companies (in the UK for example) have dedicated Market Research Managers. how the npd prosses worksThey help the central research team in gathering and interpreting consumer views. These views provide information or insights that ultimately result in the development of new products suitable for a global market.

This case study follows the development of a new NIVEA Deodorant called Pearl and Beauty aimed at young women. This case study will give you a clear picture of how market research has helped New Product Development (NPD).

IDENTIFYING CONSUMER VIEWS AND PRODUCT NEEDS – WHERE TO START?

Market research should start with the consumer and serves two purposes:

1) To inform companies about consumer needs and desires. What are the trends in the market? What do consumers want?

2) To give consumers the opportunity to talk to the providers of products and services so that their views are taken into account.

questions that need answering

Businesses exist in a fast-moving world with increased consumer choice. It is essential that a company knows its market and its consumers before developing any new product. Lots of questions need answering.

Consumer insights drive New Product Development. This information takes into account their behaviours, attitudes and beliefs. It is an expression of their wishes and desires. Businesses use consumer insights to create opportunities for their brands. It is the starting point that enables brands to fit meaningfully into consumers’ lives.

Across countries, consumers are different in terms of culture and lifestyle. NIVEA’s challenge was to find similar insights from consumers across different countries. This was used to optimize product development.

Secondary research

In the deodorant category, NIVEA used many secondary research sources to discover consumers’ views and their need for deodorants. These related to different markets and were supplied by local country market researchers. These included:

i. A consumer Usage and Attitude study. This had been conducted a few years earlier across various markets (UK, France and USA).

ii. An external study by Fragrance Houses. This covered the importance of scent and fragrance to people’s well-being and mood.

Primary research

The research team felt therefore there was not enough recent knowledge about the consumer in the secondary research. They commissioned some primary qualitative research in key markets (Germany, France, UK and USA). This was aided by the local Market Research Manager. The aim was to understand the motivations for using deodorant amongst the female consumer.

Primary research is used when there is no existing data available to answer your questions.

The research involved small discussion groups of females. This helped researchers understand the beliefs and motivations of this group. There were several main findings:

  • There is steady growth in females shaving. They wanted to look after their underarms throughout all seasons (not just in summer).
  • Women cared increasingly about the condition of their underarms.
  • Women desired attractive, neat underarms. This symbolised sensuality and femininity.
  • The deodorant segment remained focused on functional rather than beautifying products.

Results of the research

The market research revealed an unexplored market potential for NIVEA Deodorant. The brand did not have a specific product that addressed ‘underarm beauty’ for the female consumer. No direct competitor was offering a product to meet these needs. So there was a clear opportunity to develop a new product. This would fit across different markets and with the current NIVEA Deodorant range.

TURNING CUSTOMERS INSIGHTS INTO PRODUCT CONCEPTS

Consumers showed a need for a ‘beautifying, caring deodorant’. The team generated ideas on how to address the consumer need.

From these ideas the marketing team created ‘product concepts’. These describe the product benefits and how they will meet the consumer needs. Several concepts were written in different ways. These explained and expressed unique product attributes.

The company needed to know which concept was preferred by prospective consumers. It carried out market research to test whether the concepts would work. The research was conducted amongst the desired target market. For Pearl and Beauty, the desired target market was 18-35 year-old women who were beauty-orientated, followed fashion and looked for products with extra benefits.

Quantitative research on the concept was carried out in two test markets (France and Germany). An international company like Beiersdorf must test products in more than one market to assess properly the global appeal.

The concepts were tested monadically. Monadic testing means that the respondent of the test is only shown one concept. This stops the respondent being biased by seeing many variations of the same product concept.

A number of criteria were used to test the concepts:

1) Deodorant category performance measures. These included wetness, dryness, and fragrance. The new concept must deliver generic core benefits.

2) Product attributes specific to the new product and NIVEA core values. The new Pearl and Beauty product has additional benefits to a ‘regular’ deodorant. For example, it leaves your skin feeling silky and gives you beautiful underarms. Consumers needed to understand and see these benefits.

3) The product needed to be relevant and motivate a consumer to purchase it.

The team chose the ‘winning’ concept. This best conveyed beauty while remaining relevant to the deodorant category and NIVEA brand.

Next the research team tested various name ideas for the product and developed different designs for the packaging. Packaging design plays a very important role in helping to communicate the image of the product. Pearl and Beauty needed to communicate femininity and sophistication. Pink was a natural colour choice for the packaging. They also used a soft pearlescent container to emphasise the ‘pearl extracts’ in the product.

Various design ideas were tested using quantitative market research. In addition, this helped to predict the volume of the new products that would be sold, the optimal selling price and the level of switching from existing NIVEA Deodorant and competitor products.

TESTING THE PRODUCT, BRAND POSITION AND ADVERTISING

Testing

The stages described so far produced a product concept that consumers felt was relevant and which they were willing to buy. The next stage was to test the product on actual customers. Many product launches fail, despite great advertising. A big reason is because the product fails to live up to the promises made.

The Market Research Team conducted a product usage test. A de-branded sample of the proposed new product was given to the target consumer of females in several countries. De-branded means the deodorant was in a blank container so that the consumers did not know who made the product or what type it was. Very often consumers form opinions about products and services from advertising and packaging. This can sometimes be very strong and creates a bias in what they think of a product before trying it.

The consumers were asked to use the new deodorant for a week. They kept a diary of when they used it and scored the performance of the deodorant against a list of criteria. These included:

  • Did it keep you dry all day?
  • Did you have to reapply it?
  • Did you like the fragrance?
  • Did it last all day?
  • Was the deodorant reliable?

Consumers applied the ‘de-branded’ deodorant under their right armpit and continued to use their current deodorant under their left armpit. This helped the users gauge if it was as good as or better than the brand they normally used. This gave a measure of how likely the consumer would be to swap brands.

The results of the test were very positive. Most consumers loved the fragrance and the feel of the product on their skin. They felt it performed as well as their current deodorant. Most said they would swap their brands after trying the product.

Brand positioning

Now the marketing team had a new product idea that consumers liked. It had a name and packaging design that were well received. They now needed to check how this fitted with the rest of the NIVEA Deodorant brand positioning and range.

The brand position is the specific niche in the market that the brand defines itself as occupying.

The NIVEA Deodorant Pearl and Beauty adds a touch of feminine sophistication and elegance to the NIVEA Deodorant brand’s personality. This built on the core deodorant positioning. It made NIVEA Deodorant more appealing, modern and unique to trendy, young female consumers.

Using qualitative research to inform advertising

The next stage was to brief an advertising agency to develop communication to support the launch of the new product. Through market research the team could check whether the advertisements positively supported and communicated the new product.

The company conducted qualitative research on some advertising ideas amongst various groups of the target consumers. It presented ideas in the form of ‘storyboards’ of what a TV advert could look like. The objective was to evaluate which were the best ideas in terms of:

  • Did they stand out as exciting or different?
  • Were they relevant to the consumer?
  • Did they communicate the right things about the new product?
  • Did they persuade the consumer to want to purchase the product?

Evaluating success

Once the product is launched and the consumer can actually purchase it, the research process does not stop.

Continuous consumer tracking can be carried out to find out consumers’ views of the new product. This involves interviewing people every day to find out whether they are using the product, what they think of it and why they would purchase it.

Beiersdorf uses other, secondary data sources such as consumer panel data and EPOS (electronic point of sale) data. These monitor the sales effectiveness of the product throughout the launch phase and through the product life cycle.

CONCLUSION

New product development should start with an insight based on consumer needs.

Throughout the NPD process, market research is a valuable tool for Beiersdorf to check viability and minimise the risk of the product launches.

Being an international company, it is essential that Beiersdorf develops new products using the insights of consumers across markets and cultures. This ensures the products are relevant to a large number of global consumers and will deliver the maximum return when launched.

This maximises return on investment for the company and results in happy, satisfied and loyal consumers


Source: thetimes100.co.uk

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Up Your Marketing Game In 2011

The new year is upon us, and while the new year promises many new opportunities, they won’t magically appear without a game plan. Setting New Year’s resolutions is old fashion, and we all know they are most often broken. This year, set goals in the form of a marketing calendar. By setting a year full of achievable goals, you’ll set yourself up for success and create a game plan for 2011 to market your business.

Of course, everyone’s marketing calendar will be different, but I’ve laid out some ideas you can incorporate into your marketing strategy to get you started. 

1) January – Plan a marketing campaign calendar for 2011. Plan ahead to take advantage of seasonal events with promotions and leaves room to learn at least one new thing each month.

2) February – Share the love with your clients. The season of love is the perfect time to integrate or upgrade your referral program to ensure clients feel valued.

3) March – Sign up for my blog/RSS feed. I admit this seems a little self-motivated, but the key to being a successful marketer is to stay on your toes, and by receiving regular marketing information you create a reminder to stay on top of things. It also creates an atmosphere for you to continue learning each month without overwhelming yourself with too much information at one time. Plus the while reason I write my newsletter and post articles is to help stylists like you learn to market your businesses. So if you haven’t already, sign up. (See that box at the top of the right column, that’s where you can sign up for my newsletter. Above that look for the RRS icon to grab my feed.)

4) April – If you haven’t launched your business’s Facebook page yet, times a wasting. Everyday Facebook becomes more and more popular and more and more important as a marketing strategy. As previously mentioned, the stylist’s business lends itself perfectly to a Facebook strategy since our business is, after all, based on relationships.

5) May – Stock up on summer reading. Good idea is to buy books to help you create the kind of income you have always dreamed of from your favorite job.

6) June – As you head into the dog-days of summer, be a resource for your clients and potential clients. The summer is long and not so busy for most, so use your Facebook page to publish tips and information that you believe is interesting and useful for your customers.

7) July – Celebrate Christmas in July and use this opportunity to reach out to your clients and thank them for their patronage. Everyone expects cards in December, but sending cards in July is so unexpected that you will really stand out in the crowd.

8) August – As parents start to think about sending the kiddos back to school, it is the perfect time for you to remind them about a new look for fall. It’s also a great time to run promo specials for kids. What about steeply discounted kids’ rebate when mom/dad are shopping too?

9) September – By now you have mastered Facebook. It is time to tackle a new project, how about Twitter? For some reason, Twitter seems overwhelming, but once you get started you’ll see that it is very basic and lots of fun. Head over to Twitter to get started. Once you get the conversation rolling, you’ll be hooked. And better yet, your clients will be hooked on you.

10) October – BOO! Don’t underestimate the number of people who need a special look for October 31. Use the holiday to your advantage and market yourself accordingly.

11) November -Before the holiday rush sets in, set aside some time to take stock of what worked and what didn’t work in your marketing plan for 2011. This will help you be ready to prepare for 2012, and it might point out something that is lacking for the holiday push. If you never analyze what you have done, you’ll never see how to improve, so take a moment to reflect so you can adjust accordingly.

12) December – Remember the “dead zone.” If you plan correctly, you’ll be super busy during the week between Christmas and New Years, which will set you up for a great 2012.

Have a happy and prosperous new year!

Copyright (c) 2010 Tarsha Beavers

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 2 ) – Fashion Industry Career Specializations

Fashion Industry Career Specializations -BREAK IT DOWN

Coming straight from fashion school, you might be thinking that as a fashion designer, you’ll have the opportunity to work with all types of apparel. But what you may not know is that generally, the fashion industry is split into categories, and then categories within categories. Basically, the apparel industry is very specialized.
The breakdown begins with price (which usually corresponds with quality). The lowest apparel classification is Discount, and at the height of fashion is Haute Couture:
  • Discount Fashion: These stores sell fashion merchandise that retails at a discounted price from what other apparel stores charge. Outlet malls or stores like Ross, Walmart, Target, or Conway are example of discount retailers that sell discount labels.

  • Budget / Mass Market Fashion: Mass market apparel usually consists of knock offs of higher priced designer fashions that are sold at low competitive prices to the masses. Old Navy, Forever 21, and Charlotte Russe are a few popular budget apparel labels. Department stores in this category include JC Penney, and Kohl’s. This fashion market usually retails for less than $100.

  • Moderate Fashion: These include nationally advertised apparel fashion brands such as Nine West, Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Express, and Zara. Examples of moderate department stores are Macy’s and Dillards. These apparel brands typically retail for less than $300.

  • Contemporary Fashion: More than just a specific price point, this classification is a fashion-forward image often aimed at women in their ’20s and early ’30s looking for trendy fashions priced more affordably than Designer pieces. BCBG, Betsey Johnson, Bebe, and Rebecca Taylor fall into the Contemporary fashion category, which usually retails for under $500.

  • Better Fashion: Also selling for less than $500, these collections use better quality fabric and styling than lower-priced brands. Armani Exchange, Jones New York and Anne Klein are a few examples of better-priced apparel lines.

  • Bridge Fashion: Priced under $1,000, these apparel fashion lines serve as a “bridge” between better and designer fashion categories. Bridge fashion includes names like Ellen Tracy, Dana Buchman, DKNY, Emporio Armani, and Lauren by Ralph Lauren.

  • Designer Fashion: True fashion designer collections typically sell for more than $1,000 per item. The fabrics, fit, details, and trims are superior to other ready-to-wear items. Some examples of designer labels are Gucci, Prada, Versace, Armani, and Chanel.

  • Haute Couture / Avant-garde Fashion: Also know as couture, these terms have been commonly misused by ready-to-wear brands. Haute Couture, or simply “couture” fashion designers sell custom, made-to-measure apparel, which costs tens of thousands of dollars, and is affordable only to a select few. Technically speaking, there are only ten official Haute Couture Fashion Houses including: Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Chanel, and Givenchy. Avant-garde fashion designers produce high quality, one-of-a-kind garments that experiment with new fashion design concepts and push the envelope of popular apparel design.

Even within the fashion industry categories listed above, each apparel market is broken down into more specific career specializations. First, fashion companies are broken down by customer: men’s, women’s, children’s etc. Then are further divided by type of apparel: sportswear, eveningwear (special occasion), sleepwear etc. And then even fashion design teams are designated to specific areas like Wovens, Knits, Sweaters, Tops, Bottoms, Dresses, Outerwear and so on.

A discouraging thing to note about the fashion industry is that it is very difficult to move from one career category to another. If you start building your fashion design career with mass-market apparel companies, you’re going to face some barriers when you apply for that dream fashion designer job at Ralph Lauren. The same goes for apparel design specialties. If you’re experienced in designing children’s woven tops, chances are you won’t land a position designing women’s dresses. If you’re absolutely determined on making a switch in the fashion industry, you’re best bet is to start from the bottom in your desired career field and work your way up again.

Something else to consider is the different types of apparel manufacturers and retailers out there. There are fashion manufacturers who design and produce their own apparel designs, which are then sold to fashion retailers. These manufacturers do not have their own retail fashion stores. Examples include Shoshanna, Jones New York and Carmen Marc Valvo. There are also fashion manufacturers that own licenses for a variety of brands. For example, at the time of this writing, Phillips Van Heusen (PVH) owns Calvin Klein and IZOD, but licenses brands like DKNY, Sean Jean, and Kenneth Cole.

Then, there are fashion retailers that only sell merchandise purchased from manufacturers. These include stores like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. There are also many manufacturers that also have their own fashion retail locations such as Polo Ralph Lauren, Armani Exchange and Nicole Miller. Other apparel retail stores have their own product development teams and have merchandise manufactured specifically for their private label designs such as Gap, Old Navy, and Express. In addition to purchasing merchandise from outside manufacturers, many department stores also have their own private label collections. Examples are: I.N.C. (Macy’s), and Arizona Jeans (JC Penney).

Pre-Fall 2011

The largest employment opportunities out there lie within mass-market apparel companies. They often pay rather well to begin with, however these figures usually level off after a few years of experience. The higher-end fashion markets pay less to start, and work hours are longer, but the prestige you’ll receive from such reputable companies will do wonders for your resume.

Source: Desigernexus.com

 

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Mobile Fashion Apps Worth Downloading

We swear there are more lame iPhone applications out there than actual iPhones, but every once in awhile, we’ll stumble upon something brilliant that we soon find ourselves unable to live without. Fashion brands are trying to get themselves a piece of the app pie by creating applications that not only promote their brand, but engage their fans in a way they weren’t able to before. So, sorry Blackberry users—this one’s for the Mac set. Here are eight iPhone fashion apps that are well worth the time it takes to download.

Stylebook, $3.99 

style-book-fashion-app.jpg

Like a hand-held version of the closet from Clueless, Stylebook lets you take photos of your own clothing, organize it by categories, and then help you build outfits, make packing lists, and build custom Polyvore-like collages.
Love It or Lose It, $1.99

love-it-or-lose-it-fashion-app.jpg

Ever go shopping without your network of yay-and-naysayers? Pick up Love It or Lose It, which allows you to upload a photo to dispatch out to your friends and a community of users who’ll weigh in on your potential purchase.

Style.com, Free

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It’s Fashion Week, and you don’t have time to stick around in front of your computer all day to wait for images from the latest runway shows. What to do? Download Style.com’s iPhone app and get images just hours later. Stay on top of things with the Style File blogs, show reviews, and video feeds.

Lucky At Your Service Digital Concierge, Free

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With an entire magazine devoted to shopping, you’d expect that Lucky would have the best shopping application around. Their digital concierge lets you highlight their featured products, track them down, check for availability, and even place things on hold for same-day pickup.

Gucci, Free 

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Gucci’s app lets you view exclusive videos, fashion shows, latest collections, news, events, and store listings, but what’s really got us clicking is their Gucci Beats feature, which lets you mix your own music with samples compiled by Mark Ronson. Where to show your stuff off? Flip through their Little Black Book for listings of the nearest Gucci-approved restaurants, clubs, and bars in more than 20 international cities.

Chictopia, Free

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We know how addictive Chictopia can be, so be careful before you download this app onto your iPhone because you might never learn to function without it. Browse photos from their Style Gallery and read up on blog entries handpicked by the Chictopia editors. We hope to see that them adding uploading functionalities soon so we can upload our own outfits as well as browse others!

DVF, Free

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You already love DVF’s twitter, but getting the entire brand experience is super easy. Get up-to-the-minute news from the DVF team as well as shop the collection, browse latest runway shows, watch backstage videos, and locate the nearest stores. What’s more, there’s a bright-pink iPhone cover slapped with those iconic red lips so your entire phone can get in on the DVF game.

Evernote, Free

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Though it’s not a fashion application, we’ve been using Evernote to catalog all the style inspiration we spot on the Internet or in real life. Save, organize, and annotate your images and links for perusal later. Your inner obsessive compulsive will be thrilled you downloaded it!

Source: Refinery29.com By: Connie Wang

Monoxious

BEST APPS TO DOWNLOAD by Arissa

There’s no question that we love our iPhones and as the advocates of Apple fandom, we think it is only right that we come up with a list of the best fashion apps to download for the iPhone. Technology makes it so easy for a person to be fashionable and stylish with the help of iPhone apps, the ease of use also allows for you to be up to date with the latest fashion news and updates. Truly, there is an iPhone app for anything.

I must also clarify that it is a total coincidence that the all apps featured happened to have black icons. Guess the designers do know the colour that’s in fashion.

Fashion Terms iPhone app($0.99)

  • Basic Fashion terminology
  • Explains fashion terms, differentiating garments and describes different fabrics.
  • Well designed app with simple navigation.
  • Might be a tad too simple for advanced fashionistas but a good app overall for beginners.
  • Download for the Fashion Terms iPhone app here

Topshop iPhone app (free to download)

I love Topshop (who doesn’t?!?!?!) and I’m really glad to know that they have an iPhone app for it so I can keep up to date with their newest items on the go. It’s my favorite store to hunt for basics and also dressy pieces.

  • Beautifully designed interface with regular updates.
  • Location based so you can locate the nearest Topshop branch near you.
  • Updated 5 times a week with new items so you’ll always know which are the newest items.
  • Download link for the Topshop iPhone app here

Style.com iPhone app (free to download)

Things can get a little crazy during fashion week and there are 67457237 fashion shows to catch up on. The Style.com iPhone app makes it SO simple to catch up on fashion shows while you’re on the go. It updates and prompts you on the fashion shows that you have not viewed and I sometimes screencap the look that I like and just attached it to a tweet to share with everyone.

  • View runway looks on the go
  • Prompts you on the fashion shows that you have not viewed.
  • Vote for the “Look of the day”
  • Download link for the Style.com iPhone app here

All Saints iPhone app (free to download)

I was in the All Saints store in Soho, New York some time back and I was pleasantly surprised to see iPads in the store with a catalogue for customers to browse. Little did I know that the same app that they are using for the iPad is also available to the public on the iPhone. Simply amazing.

  • Wonderful interface with easy to browse pages.
  • Cohesive look with the rest of the other marketing visuals ( online store website, store display, lookbook pictures)
  • Location based to find the nearest All Saints store near you.
  • Regularly updated
  • Download the All Saints iPhone app here

Sartorialist iPhone app (free to download)

I do wish that monoxious.com has an app for itself. The Sartorialist is awesome, after the success of the Sartorialist book, it goes on to having an iPhone app. This application makes it easy to browse the looks that was taken off the sartorialist blog.

  • Easy to browse looks and pictures.
  • Easy to save pictures to camera roll and share on Facebook.
  • Sometimes takes too long to load photos.
  • Download link for the Sartorialist iPhone app here

eBay Fashion iPhone app (free to download)

This is an eBay application specifically made for the Fashion category of eBay listings. Using this iPhone app, you can browse through a large selection of men’s, women’s, children and vintage clothing.

  • Fashion specific eBay iPhone app
  • browse through fashion related listings on eBay on the go.
  • Fashion Vault section of the app offers time limited, exclusive sale on designer items.
  • Download eBay Fashion iPhone app here.

Source: Monoxious.com

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