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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 4 ) – Learning the Fashion Lingo of the Fashion Industry !

Fashion Industry Terminology That May Come Up in an Interview

When it’s time for that big job interview, don’t get thrown off-guard when an interviewer uses a fashion industry term you don’t know. Make sure you’re familiar with the common apparel industry terms listed below. You might even try using some yourself to really impress!


Fashion Illustrations: Used most often in fashion design portfolios, these stylized fashion figure drawings are what most people think of when talking about “fashion design”. While fashion schools focus heavily on fashion illustrations, they are rarely used by designers in the apparel industry. Despite this, fashion illustrations are still used in fashion design portfolios, because they demonstrate a fashion designer’s sketching skills and individuality, adding a “wow” factor to their presentation.

Mood Board: Used often in fashion portfolio layouts, the mood board is placed at the beginning of each design group and contains images, fabric swatches, trims, and other findings, which express the mood, inspiration and color story for the collection of apparel designs that follow.

Flats: Flat sketches, better known in the fashion industry as “flats”, are black and white fashion sketches that show a garment as if it were laid “flat” to display all seams, hardware, and any other design details. While they can be drawn by hand, nowadays fashion flats are usually sketched using computer software such as Adobe Illustrator. Always included in design packages and tech packs, they serve as an important reference for patternmakers, merchandisers, as well as production and sales teams, and manufacturers. Flats are an absolute must in every apparel design room.


Line Sheet: A line sheet is a reference guide used by salespeople and buyers when discussing and presenting am apparel collection to buyers. Typically, several garment styles are listed on one page and the following information is included for each style: a black and white flat sketch, style number, season, price, delivery date / order cut-off date, color, and fabric information. They usually contain actual fabric swatches as well.

CADs: Fashion CADs, (Computer Aided Designs) are computerized, color rendered, flat sketches that simulate the appearance of an actual garment. As a basic rule of thumb, the more realistic the CAD sketch is – the better. CAD sketches are often used as visual aids during sales presentations, and can serve as a sample substitute when an actual sample is not yet available. They are often sent to buyers for visual references.

Presentation Boards: Most fashion presentation boards are simply CADs, except they are presented in a nicer layout. Usually including fabric swatches or artwork, they are preferred by most sales people for presentations. Even when real samples are available, they add variety to an already existing style.

Specs: Sample specifications or “specs” are garment measurements and details that are included in design packages and tech packs. Many apparel specs are shown along with fashion flat sketches, and are important to sample development.

Tech Pack: Also known as design packages, tech packs are vital to the garment production process. Usually they contain fully detailed fashion flats and specs, topstitching and hardware details, any necessary artwork layouts, and basically any other information required to produce a sample garment. Tech packs are sent to factories to make apparel samples for approval.

Fits: Fits, or garment fittings, is the process of making sure a sample garment meets all necessary measurement and detail specifications to achieve the desired fit. Conducted by technical designers, the apparel fitting process involves measuring a sample garment, checking all hardware, topstitching and details, and communicating any necessary comments or revisions with factories.

Grades / Grading: When the fit of a sample garment is approved, a size grade will be sent to the factories to begin production. A size grade is a chart containing measurements for the ordered size range of an approved style.

Color Card: The specific color themes used in each season’s fashion line are chosen from color forecasting services. Color cards are then assembled for fashion presentations, combining forecasted colors with standard popular selling colors.

Yarn Dyed: Fabric that is woven with yarns that were dyed before weaving. Most good quality fabrics are yarn dyed.

Piece Dyed: Fabric that is dyed in a vat by the bolt (full piece) after it is woven.

Lab-dips: Lab dips are conducted by factories to provide a visual aid of how a color will look when it is dyed. Since the lab dip is produced in a beaker and is not an actual production run, the actual production sample will vary from the lab dip that is provided. When the goods are dyed in a real production run, the conditions are dramatically different from the laboratory. Production does not begin on fabric unless a lab dip is approved or the customer waives the lab dip process.

Textile Design: Quite often in the apparel industry, fashion designers are involved in the process of creating textile designes, which is artwork for prints, plaids, or stripes to be used in fabric development and production.

Strike-off: A test sample of printed fabric made to show and verify color and pattern before entering into production on larger quantities.

Pitch Sheet: A pitch sheet shows a full repeat of a textile design and contains samples of the individual colors included in that print. Pitch sheets are used by factories to produce strike-offs for approval.

Source: Designernexus.com

Read also:

  • Fulfilling Your Vision ( Part 5 ):
    Becoming Your Own Fashion Designer
  • Put Together ( Part 6 ):
    What to Include in Your Fashion Portfolio
  • Setting the Course ( Part 7 ):
    Developing an Action Plan for Your Fashion Career
  • Look Good on Paper ( Part 8 ):
    Writing a Fashion Resume and Cover Letter that will Get You in the Door
  • Preparation is the Key ( Part 9 ):
    Preparing for, and Mastering the Interview

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How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 2 ) – Fashion Industry Career Specializations

Fashion Industry Career Specializations -BREAK IT DOWN

Coming straight from fashion school, you might be thinking that as a fashion designer, you’ll have the opportunity to work with all types of apparel. But what you may not know is that generally, the fashion industry is split into categories, and then categories within categories. Basically, the apparel industry is very specialized.
The breakdown begins with price (which usually corresponds with quality). The lowest apparel classification is Discount, and at the height of fashion is Haute Couture:
  • Discount Fashion: These stores sell fashion merchandise that retails at a discounted price from what other apparel stores charge. Outlet malls or stores like Ross, Walmart, Target, or Conway are example of discount retailers that sell discount labels.

  • Budget / Mass Market Fashion: Mass market apparel usually consists of knock offs of higher priced designer fashions that are sold at low competitive prices to the masses. Old Navy, Forever 21, and Charlotte Russe are a few popular budget apparel labels. Department stores in this category include JC Penney, and Kohl’s. This fashion market usually retails for less than $100.

  • Moderate Fashion: These include nationally advertised apparel fashion brands such as Nine West, Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Express, and Zara. Examples of moderate department stores are Macy’s and Dillards. These apparel brands typically retail for less than $300.

  • Contemporary Fashion: More than just a specific price point, this classification is a fashion-forward image often aimed at women in their ’20s and early ’30s looking for trendy fashions priced more affordably than Designer pieces. BCBG, Betsey Johnson, Bebe, and Rebecca Taylor fall into the Contemporary fashion category, which usually retails for under $500.

  • Better Fashion: Also selling for less than $500, these collections use better quality fabric and styling than lower-priced brands. Armani Exchange, Jones New York and Anne Klein are a few examples of better-priced apparel lines.

  • Bridge Fashion: Priced under $1,000, these apparel fashion lines serve as a “bridge” between better and designer fashion categories. Bridge fashion includes names like Ellen Tracy, Dana Buchman, DKNY, Emporio Armani, and Lauren by Ralph Lauren.

  • Designer Fashion: True fashion designer collections typically sell for more than $1,000 per item. The fabrics, fit, details, and trims are superior to other ready-to-wear items. Some examples of designer labels are Gucci, Prada, Versace, Armani, and Chanel.

  • Haute Couture / Avant-garde Fashion: Also know as couture, these terms have been commonly misused by ready-to-wear brands. Haute Couture, or simply “couture” fashion designers sell custom, made-to-measure apparel, which costs tens of thousands of dollars, and is affordable only to a select few. Technically speaking, there are only ten official Haute Couture Fashion Houses including: Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Chanel, and Givenchy. Avant-garde fashion designers produce high quality, one-of-a-kind garments that experiment with new fashion design concepts and push the envelope of popular apparel design.

Even within the fashion industry categories listed above, each apparel market is broken down into more specific career specializations. First, fashion companies are broken down by customer: men’s, women’s, children’s etc. Then are further divided by type of apparel: sportswear, eveningwear (special occasion), sleepwear etc. And then even fashion design teams are designated to specific areas like Wovens, Knits, Sweaters, Tops, Bottoms, Dresses, Outerwear and so on.

A discouraging thing to note about the fashion industry is that it is very difficult to move from one career category to another. If you start building your fashion design career with mass-market apparel companies, you’re going to face some barriers when you apply for that dream fashion designer job at Ralph Lauren. The same goes for apparel design specialties. If you’re experienced in designing children’s woven tops, chances are you won’t land a position designing women’s dresses. If you’re absolutely determined on making a switch in the fashion industry, you’re best bet is to start from the bottom in your desired career field and work your way up again.

Something else to consider is the different types of apparel manufacturers and retailers out there. There are fashion manufacturers who design and produce their own apparel designs, which are then sold to fashion retailers. These manufacturers do not have their own retail fashion stores. Examples include Shoshanna, Jones New York and Carmen Marc Valvo. There are also fashion manufacturers that own licenses for a variety of brands. For example, at the time of this writing, Phillips Van Heusen (PVH) owns Calvin Klein and IZOD, but licenses brands like DKNY, Sean Jean, and Kenneth Cole.

Then, there are fashion retailers that only sell merchandise purchased from manufacturers. These include stores like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. There are also many manufacturers that also have their own fashion retail locations such as Polo Ralph Lauren, Armani Exchange and Nicole Miller. Other apparel retail stores have their own product development teams and have merchandise manufactured specifically for their private label designs such as Gap, Old Navy, and Express. In addition to purchasing merchandise from outside manufacturers, many department stores also have their own private label collections. Examples are: I.N.C. (Macy’s), and Arizona Jeans (JC Penney).

Pre-Fall 2011

The largest employment opportunities out there lie within mass-market apparel companies. They often pay rather well to begin with, however these figures usually level off after a few years of experience. The higher-end fashion markets pay less to start, and work hours are longer, but the prestige you’ll receive from such reputable companies will do wonders for your resume.

Source: Desigernexus.com

 

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Careers In Fashion Design

  • Fashion Design is meant for people good at creativity, making others watch you and others to follow your way then going to a fashion design school, getting a fashion marketing education, or attending a fashion design college is the right path for you. Find advantages, eligibility, skills and aptitude required, fee suggestions and career prospectus of fashion design education in India.


Fashion Design is a source which shows you to develop your ideas and extensive research. Combination of experts (lectures) in fashion and design workshops training is fashion design education. Fashion Design has rapidly spread its architecture in India, presently this course is available in major cities like Bangalore, Mumbai, Pune, New Delhi, Chennai, Hyderabad and Kolkata. In coming few years say two to three this course will be available in each part of the country.
Advantages Easier way for upcoming fashion designers, the government as well as privately funded institutions have introduced comprehensive courses. In past five years India has seen lot of fashion design Institutes popular and huge amount of students joined fashion design as a serious degree.
Eligibility of Fashion Design in India
Performance in entrance exam For undergraduate programs – 10+2 with a minimum of 50% from any recognized board of education For postgraduate program a bachelor’s degree in a specific field. Having a portfolio of sketches, drawings and other artistic creations help.
Skills and Aptitude Originality, creativity, an eye for detail and understanding of clothes and fashion Knack for combining the right color shades, textures and fabrics to to bring to life one’s imagination Knowledge of fabrics, the way they draping, material, weaving styles, color and design Basic tailoring skills Good communication skills Fashion consciousness Market awareness and awareness of the consumer’s preferences.
Fee Suggestions
Like most vocational courses, a degree in fashion too is expensive. Educational loans are an option for those who aren’t able to afford it on their own, personal loans are also a viable option to finance one’s education though they come with a higher rate of interest. 10227j 3 Days of Fashion_DSC_3318
Career Prospects
Fashion Designing is a demanding profession. The long working hours during college only prepare one for the long working hours as professional. And one should remember that Fashion Designing is not only limited to designing clothes. Fashion design in fact includes a vast gamut of professions that include Jewelry or accessory designing. Most designers start by apprenticing with an established fashion designer or a fashion house or look for employment in an export or manufacturing unit. Others freelance from a HIME studio or boutique and develop their own labels.
Career options can include any of the following:
* Fashion marketing
* Merchandising
* fashion design production
* Costume design
* Personal stylist
* Technical designer
* Production pattern maker
* Cutting assistant
* Fashion coordinator
* Apparel production manager
* Fabric buyer
* Fabric quality control manager
* Sales representative
* Fashion journalism
* Fashion photography
Fashion Designing a career aspect, students should not have a doubt about joining Top fashion design institutes.

Source: Articlesnatch.com By: Minglebox

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RFID in Apparel Industry: What is it, How it Works and the Benefits.

What is RFID?
Radio Frequency Identification, or RFID, is an identification or tagging method that is similar in function to a bar code on an apparel product or shipping carton.

The tags can be read through packaging and cartons without the line of sight necessary for reading barcodes. RFID technology has three components: microchip tags that carry the data, antennas that send the data, and readers that interpret the data. Cartons or products using RFID technology carry a transponder made from a microchip attached to an antenna like the one pictured here. It can be very small but read distance performance will depend on size. These tags can be placed in an apparel product without affecting its comfort or look, for example, the tag might be in a seam or hem or in a paper carton label. The RFID readers can be placed in the entry of a warehouse and, depending upon the size and frequency of the RFID used, it can be read up to 20 feet though most in use today read only about 2 to 10 feet.



How is RFID affecting the apparel and sewn products industry?
RFID labels are smart labels that can provide information for a number of applications in the apparel supply chain. Their unique information can be captured automatically once the labels are applied at product inception, and the information is highly accurate and secure. Some RFID can be modified at stages of the supply chain using the interaction between the microchip and reader software. RFID is traceable or can be tracked to provide a production and inventory control system, used for “smart shelves” real time inventory, retail security system, and even as an authentication to identify counterfeiting of brands.

What needs to happen before RFID use is widespread?
RFID is in its infancy and there are several roadblocks to its sweeping implementation. First, there are many versions of RFID technology that operate at different radio frequencies and require different software and readers. One or several frequencies need to be agreed upon so that there can be interoperability between retailers, manufacturers, and distributors using only one set of technologies. In addition, the cost of the technology needs to be reduced. Right now, it costs about 40 cents per chip as compared to 4 cents for a barcodes. The cost of RFID readers and software also need to be considered.

Standardization is underway in the organization of data into an Electronic Product Code (EPC), currently a voluntary standard. The EPC, similar to the UPC for barcodes, includes a header and three sets of data: manufacturer id, SKU, and item unique code, for a total of 96-bits of information.
Privacy has become an issue as the microchip will remain in the product for its lifetime. Several consumer activist groups are concerned that the consumer’s privacy will be compromised as their activities with the product could be followed by the technology. Industry has countered this concern by developing systems to automatically deactivate the microchips at time of purchase.

When will RFID be implemented?
RFID will be implemented at the carton level first, as this is where the greatest cost benefit lies and where it will be the easiest to implement.

The use of RFID to enhance the shopping experience and streamline retail operations has been a near decade long discussion itself.  In 2004, Wal-Mart issued its now famous mandate, requiring its top 100 suppliers to apply RFID tags to shipping crates and pallets to drive efficiencies into its supply chain.  Wal-Mart and others proposed that this technology would ultimately find its way to the retail floor to provide item-level inventory accuracy and real-time visibility into inventory levels and purchase patterns.  While Wal-Mart’s supply chain RFID initiative did not pan out on its initial time table, it kicked off a high level of interest in RFID technology from retailers and retail industry suppliers.

So here we are.  What’s new?  Well, quite a bit actually.

RFID continues to be explored for a variety of uses within the retail market.  Top among them, according to a report recently published by the Aberdeen Group, include process efficiency, product and demand visibility, shrink management, and increasing profits.  While these may not be new goals for many retailers, one very important point Aberdeen makes is: “The RFID industry finally has a portfolio of solutions (including tags and readers) with a form-factor that is broad enough, stable, and standards-compliant such that it applies to and satisfies the diverse needs of the retail environment.” This statement can’t be ignored.  It is clearly stated by Aberdeen believes that the technology itself is no longer barrier to entry.

A second area of interest is the rate of adoption within the retail market.  According to a recent blog posts from VDC Research, the retail market will account for only 6-7% of the total global revenues in 2010 – out of a $4.2 billion market. Yes, a small percentage of the entire market, but for RFID vendors this should be viewed as an opportunity to innovate!

So where will this innovation come from?  Will Wal-Mart’s recent announcements to use RFID to track jeans and underwear to improve its inventory be a tipping point for retail industry adoption of the technology?   Will smart signs and smart shelves become commonplace in retail stores?  What will the magic mirror tell us the next time we stand in front of it?

PSFK resized 600Over the next several months, we’ll explore areas within the retail market that can be impacted by RFID.  In the meantime, take a look at this incredible, thought provoking presentation developed by New York City based trends research and innovation company PSFK, titled – you got it – the Future of retail.

PSFK invites us to: “…think less about real estate, staff, footfall and online stores and start thinking about the entire world as a store; one in which we can easily make instant purchases regardless of time and place. Driven by technology, the web, community and the search for ever-richer experiences, the world of shopping is undergoing a sweeping transformation.”

Sound familiar?

Sources: tx.ncsu.edu and RFID.thingmagic.com

RFID CASE STUDY

RFID Solutions in Apparel

RFID TECHNOLOGY VIDEO

RFID IN FASHION

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