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The Main Runway for Fashion Industry – Social Media, The New Fashion Icon!

social media and fashion industry

social media and fashion industry

Fashion Week Ready-to-Wear Fall/Winter 2012/2013 Collection.

Social Media has never been as important as this year. Bloggers are now invited to sit on the front rows, not only focusing on early-days streetstyles. They work closely with brands on the marketing side, but are also more and more involved in the creative process. Karl Lagerfeld regulary meets bloggers. Alexandre de Betak, one of the most famous Art Directors, is now contributing to Caroline Daily’s personal blog. A real revolution in the fashion world.

Because the microcosm was pretty reluctant to this “democratization  of fashion through digital, especially of high fashion“.But few trends changed the rules: Social Media is now the most important runway. An everlasting runway, that changes players, shareholders, reputation and creativity.

fashion and social media

fashion and social media

A professionalization of digital fashion influencers

Fashion bloggers aren’t just cool guys with cool cameras anymore. They not only shoot themselves in a mirror. They are designers, freelance consultants, copywriters, sometimes wannabe stars. Female AND male. Or so-called “slashers“:

“For the typical member of Gen Y, as well as the soon-to-be working age Millennials, the typical behaviour patterns of immediate pleasure seeking, multitasking and low boredom thresholds (typically all summed into the phrase ‘instant on’) makes slashing particularly appealing. (…) It is no surprise that greater quantities of people under 30 are choosing to have portfolio careers”.

Quality is enhanced: some bloggers now have their personal photographers. New skills are appearing in blog-posts: art direction, production, work with agencies. Talent managers are now targeting these people, booking them with the right brands.

social media in fashion for fashion

social media in fashion for fashion

When fashionistas meet entrepreneurs

On eBay France, fashion-related items are the most sought and sold. Some investors decided to dive into these new markets, trying to encourage young platforms to rise. Even if the gap can be huge between creatives and techies, it’s now melting:

“What we know unequivocally is that the momentum fashion startups are having–and this phenomenon of fashion, technology and finance coming together–won’t be slowing down in 2012.”

In France, Ben & Fakto has just conciliated fashion needs and post-crisis reality, focusing on “happy fashion” and social marketing, partnering with Babyloan.

What used to be 2 opposite worlds, is now merging. Because digital culture is now directly impacting the way fashion rejuvenates its ideas, finding new roots to some kinds of digital undergrounds. Main famous brands are now on TumblR, a way to propagate their vision of fashion but also to directly plug with new trendsetters. Trendsetters because they MAKE trends (photography etc.).

From inner circle to pervasive fashion

Communication used to be mastered. Authorized journalists were covering the runways. It was an inner-circle of happy fews. Where brands were only challenged by other brands. This time is over.

Traditional Haute Couture brands need to shape new paths. Because the inner-circle is becoming more and more pervasive. The agenda is challenged; there are now so many Fashion Weeks worldwide that there’s too much noise to only count on them. New media like Refinery 29 are dismantling Vogue or other traditional opinion leaders. Bloggers take the lead and do not hesitate anymore to claim when these editorial pipelines go wrong. The last example against ELLE France (accused of racism) has demonstrated that it’s no longer “fashion top journalists” against “the people”; and convinced us that “Eagles” can sometimes be cheap.

When classic catwalks aren’t enough to emerge

Since Louis Vuitton in 2009, the very first luxury brand to broadcast its fashion show live on Facebook, all the other brands have tried to follow the idea that a catwalk needed to be live. That this catwalk should be broadcast, commented, shared, by online communities of influencers. That the most important thing was to generated weak links, “hyphenated marketing“, that could be activated at the best time. We’ve seen in January that it’s not that easy to organize: during the last Gucci live stream catwalk (Men collection), we were only some dozens to live-chat on the related platform. Not much impact compared to Burberry.

Because it requires many skills (Social CRM, digital branding, Social Media Marketing) that cannot be improvized.

The last stats have shown how important fashion e-commerce is:

“Converting the sale online should be the very next focus for fashion sales online,” noted
Cohen, “Getting the consumer to go from browsing to purchasing takes new information beyond just product photos and price. It takes convincing the consumer to push the purchase button.”

A world in which Social Media is not an asset apart. But the core one.

Source: Socialmediatoday.com

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Digital Fashion Week – World’s First Live Streaming Only Fashion Week to be Hosted In Singapore October 2012

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

Live streaming of fashion shows has become de rigueur but we’re taking it up a notch with Digital Fashion Week (DFW). As the world’s first live streaming only fashion week, DFW will unify fashion and technology innovation in this groundbreaking advancement.

 

Digital Fashion Week 2012

 

Gone is the era of front row guests at the traditional fashion weeks. This time, we’re going digital. For the first time in fashion history, a fashion week will be live streamed solely online, and consumers can shop their favorite looks off the runway in real time and have them delivered in a matter of weeks – way before they hit the stores.

A high-profile showcase of celebrated designers from every major city, DFW gives designers the ability to reach out to consumers worldwide and global audiences absolute access into the world of fashion.

Labeled by CNN Go as ‘The Next Big Names in Singapore Fashion’, DFW is organized by the creative minds of STORM Creative Events Agency. As the pioneer of fashion show live streaming in Singapore in May 2011, it garnered a record high of 500,000 viewers from 90 countries within a week.

This October will see DFW’s debut edition, Digital Fashion Week Singapore exclusively available for viewing at http://www.digitalfashionweek.com. The twice-yearly event boasts an exciting designer lineup of Singapore’s biggest names presenting their Spring/Summer 2013 collections, with a special appearance by an international guest designer marking the inaugural event in a debut runway show.

Digital Fashion Week

Quote startMr. Keyis Ng, co-founder of Digital Fashion Week states, “Until now, no digital platform as powerful as DFW has
existed for designers to reach out to people worldwide.”Quote end

Besides live coverage of DFW front row and backstage buzz, interviews with designers and artistes and fringe events, DFW incorporates new features such as live runway commentaries by key fashion figures, pre-show performances by internationally renowned artistes and a one-stop mobile application to provide users with instant fashion show live streaming, videos, runway photos, designers information and e-commerce shopping – giving the global audiences a dynamic fashion week experience like never before.

Digital Fashion Week consists of three main elements:

Front Row Access:
Live backstage action of hair and makeup.
Live interviews with models, designers, hair and makeup artists.
Live pre-show performances by renowned artistes.
Live runway shows with special appearances by top models . Live runway commentary by key fashion figures.
Live post-show party coverage.

Real-Time Shopping:
Consumers can buy their favorite designs off the runway instantly and have them delivered within a matter of weeks.

Power to Influence:
Consumers will have the unique opportunity to provide the designers with instant feedback. The pre-orders made for every collection will provide designers with insights into market trends.

Mr. Keyis Ng, co-founder of DFW states, “Until now, no digital platform as powerful as DFW has
existed for designers to reach out to people worldwide. We aim to harness technology and
creativity to promote home-grown designers in each city to the global audiences by capitalizing on the hype generated from the fashion shows. The buzz created will then be directly converted into sales and sync the fashion communication cycle with its retail cycle.”

In conjunction with Digital Fashion Week Singapore, a virtual B2B platform, DFW Digital Showroom will also be launched. Press, buyers and retailers from all over the world can enjoy
exclusive access to intimate collection presentations by the DFW designers through lookbook
images and pre-recorded videos made available immediately after every fashion show. DFW will be the ultimate digital fashion gateway in connecting designers to the world.

“Singapore has grown to be Asia’s most network-ready country with one of the highest mobile
penetrations in the world. The age of Digital Fashion is here; it is the perfect timing for the fashion
industry to embrace the future of technology, first-hand in Singapore.” co-founder of DFW, Ms.Charina Widjaja said.

Besides its official launch as a twice-yearly event in Singapore, DFW will also proceed to other major cities around the world.

Show schedule, designer and performance lineup, additional updates will be announced in August 2012.

Frontrow DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

Frontrow DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

About Digital Fashion Week Private Limited
Digital Fashion Week Pte Ltd was founded in 2012 by the creative minds behind STORM Creative Events Agency. STORM is widely recognized for pushing boundaries by combining technology with lifestyle and was named by ELLE Singapore as ‘The Name to Watch’ within the first year of its launch. STORM has also been featured several times in leading publications namely Marketing Magazine UK, CIO Asia, Springwise.com, TrendHunter.com, The Straits Times, The New Paper, Lian He Zao Bao and many more. The team at STORM has worked with many established fashion houses ranging from high-end designer labels to mass market brands.

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

Original Source: PRWeb.com

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Networking Tips: How to Work a Room

Networking can serve as a valuable strategy for getting a lead on a job, gathering information, or catching the special attention of a company recruiter.

Most of us are not born minglers. Practice and preparation will help you develop the skills it takes to be effective at an Employer Info Session, a Career Fair, or other serendipitous opportunities. As difficult or awkward as it may feel at first, the ability to meet and make a positive, professional impression on people will become ever more important as your career advances and develops. Here are some tips to get you started.

Check your attitude

Many of us are shy or reluctant to approach strangers in new social situations, so understandably it’s not always easy to muster the energy to try and connect with people at networking events. That’s why it’s key to get mentally geared up before you even show up. Because your attitude often guides your behavior, you must overcome any negative self-talk that could hinder you from reaching out to others. Do these outlooks sound familiar?

  • “Why should I bother trying to impress this person? I’m only one of a hundred students this recruiter is going to see today.”
  • “I don’t think I know enough to engage the company reps in an intelligent conversation.”
  • “I’ve never really been good at meeting people. That’s just my personality.”

Such negative thoughts prevent you from pushing past any social roadblocks standing in your way. The truth is that many, if not most, people have similar thoughts in group situations and are just as hesitant to initiate conversations. But if you change your attitude from negative to positive, you can instead take the lead. Remember:

  • People enjoy talking about themselves. Ask them questions to get them started.
  • People feel flattered when you show an interest in them and their work/organization. And they will reciprocate your demonstrations of sincere interest.
  • You have more to offer others than you might think; just believe it.

Redefine what it means to interact with “strangers”

When you join a new student organization or club, you share certain interests with the members. When you go to a party, you run into people you’ve seen in class or around your dorm. A networking event is not really all that different if you view it as an occasion to find what you have in common with other people there. Commonalities help “strangers” connect more easily.

  • Take the initiative to approach others, introduce yourself, and share a piece of information that could reveal the common thread you share with them.
  • During conversations, listen carefully to discover shared interests or goals.
  • Use your shared background or interests as the basis for sustaining conversations.

Prepare and practice your self-introduction

To avoid being tongue-tied when you try to start a conversation with someone you don’t know, prepare a self-introduction that is clear, interesting, and well delivered. What you say about yourself will depend on the nature of the event, but in any case, it shouldn’t take longer than 8-10 seconds. Although practicing your introduction might at first seem silly and artificial, it will eventually help you make an introduction that sounds natural, confident, and smooth. Here are a few examples:

  • “Hi, my name is Catherine Lee. I’m glad to have this chance to meet you and learn how a psychology major can break into the pharmaceutical industry.” [Employer Information Session]
  • “Good morning, I’m Bryan Sampson, a former summer intern at your Los Angeles branch.” [Career Fair]
  • “Hello, my name is Jessica Garcia. I’m a junior rhetoric major looking to find out what it’s like working in public relations and marketing.” [Career Speed Dating Event]

Risk rejection – it’s not the end of the world

It happens. Some individuals may not respond to your introduction in the way you would like. If that takes place, don’t take it personally and just move on. As long as you maintain an outgoing and friendly attitude, you can plan for continued networking success by:

  • Identifying the goals you want to achieve at the networking event before you go (e.g., to learn more about a career, to develop internship leads, etc.)
  • Keeping a healthy sense of humor.
  • Treating everyone as you would want to be treated. Aside from being the courteous thing to do, you don’t know who might be helpful to you in the future.

And last, but not least, don’t forget how important it is for you to physically move around and about when you’re at a networking event. You can’t work a room when you’re sitting down! So get in there and show them what you’ve got.

Source: Career.berkeley.edu

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5 Proven Ways to Create a Successful Niche Business

Too many business owners fish in the widest and deepest pools’ trying to be all things to all people. Offering a broad range of products and services to a broad audience and never really create the waves that lead to tremendous profits. By positioning yourself at the top of a smaller, well defined pool (or niche) you will set your business apart from the competition and create a profitable business.

Here are five proven ways to create a profitable niche business.

1. Define Your Market

Research the needs and challenges of your target audience and capitalize on those needs. Understand the community and develop solutions that appeal to a specific group. For example – Understanding Social media in Small Business is a need of the small business community, a niche market would be to develop a product or service that teach small business owners how to use social media in their business.

2. Create Your Product or Service

Based upon the needs of your target audience, you want to create a product or offer a service that addresses those needs. Many start with developing their products first without researching if there is a market for it. First define your audience and establish there is a demand for a new product and then develop it.

3. Create Your Brand Promise

The brand promise is a statement of what your customers can expect every time they engage with your company and is the center of your business. When a brand stands out with a strong promise that deliver value consistently, the value of your offering increases and customers will be willing to whip out their wallets and pay for your products.

4. Become the Expert

Position yourself as an expert in your niche and become the “go to guy” for this product of service. Showcase your knowledge and expertise by writing articles, participating in forums and providing tips, techniques and strategies in short, succinct messages via popular social networking sites.

5. Create specific messages direct to your niche

Business is conducted on an emotional level. Now that you have identified your market, built a community around your offering, you must communicate with your target market frequently. Develop specific messages targeted towards your niche market appealing to their emotions and demonstrating your benefits. It takes 7 times before somebody is comfortable enough with you and your expertise to buy from you so be specific, be credible and offer extraordinary value.

No matter if you are a retailer, service professional, internet marketer or mom and pop shop, you stand for something. There is a reason that you went into business and a reason why you want your business run a certain way. Building a brand starts with defining what is your core purpose and the inherent promise you are making to your customers and delivering value every time. Isolating your niche in your area of expertise and bringing solutions to a targeted group will keep the cash registers ringing every time.

Source: Nicebusinesssecretsrevealed.com

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Consumer Psychology: Understand your Customer

“…the aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous. The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him and sells itself.” ~ Peter Drucker

Introduction
Markets have influenced our acquiring/buying habits from the earliest days of our evolution, perhaps as early as bartering systems in pre-historic times. One tribe had an excess catch from hunting; another tribe had an excess of hides from last season’s catch and the market is born. The exchange of goods is motivated by need and its reptilian drive, “survival of the fittest”.

Fast forward to today’s modern marketing. As the science of marketing has developed, several concepts have gained wide-spread application. The primary focus today is that fully understanding and tapping into the consumer’s motivation, which can be deeply subconscious, results in brand loyalty in purchasing products and services. An example is Clotaire Rapaille’s approach that to understand the “collective unconscious” and thereby articulate the “code” opens the way to desired marketing success.

The foundation of marketing science is based on market research strategy, to know the customer and to fill needs that need filling. Understanding the customer can produce high-quality products, such as Apple has done. On the other hand, some marketing approaches have turned into manipulative endeavors to sculpt the customer to believe they need what’s being sold. This form of marketing is distorted and disturbing. This BLOG post reviews the history and development of marketing as a science, then explores the power of modern customer-centric marketing updated for the digital age, and then looks at the downside of manipulative marketing.

Background – Development of Marketing as a Science
Early development of marketing as a science included Louis Cheskin and Neil Borden. Cheskin contributed the “customer-centric” approach, rather than the top down approach that had been previously popular. The earlier approach to marketing was top-down, where a company would create a new product with the assumption that it would sell. A customer-centric approach is based on consumer feedback, often through customer focus groups and observation. This approach defines the needs of the customer thereby providing products and services that meet those needs. For example, through customer research, Cheskin helped engineer the success of margarine by changing it’s color from white to yellow, and advertising it’s similarity to butter (Cheskin, 1959).

Borden, in his seminal article, “The Concept of the Marketing Mix,” named the 4Ps: Product, Price, Place and Promotion (Borden, 1964). The evolution of technology has brought with it increasing speed as well as additional Ps: People and Performance. We have moved from a top down approach, where the consumer was thought to be one amongst many and easily influenced, to a customer centric approach, where individuality, instinctual desires and inner drives have become the focus of marketers.

Purpose of Marketing
I believe there is a true purpose to the original intent of marketing. Discovering human needs and providing the products or services that support those needs is the most effective formula for exchange in the marketplace.

In Making Meaning: How Successful Businesses Deliver Meaningful Customer Experiences, the authors state, “We envision a time when customers increasingly make their purchase decisions based on deeply valued meanings that companies evoke for them through their products and services – in other words, meaningful consumption – as opposed to simply responding based on features, price, brand identity, and emotional pitches” (Diller, Shedroff, & Rhea, 2008, p. 1).

For example, Apple captured the MP3 market with the iPod and iTunes. The iPod became an emotionally constructed appendage that represents much more than just a music device. It has become a cultural icon that people purchase not only for usefulness but also for a sense of belonging, an image of appearing “cool,” and much like a stylistic piece of jewelry, it comes in hip colors and unique styles.

The Evolution of Marketing Research
Concept Engineering, a market research approach developed by Gary Burchill at MIT, uses an ethnological immersion process called “Voice of the Customer.” Key people on a new product team visit customers, interviewing and observing them in order to discern what the true need is. They are especially trying to discover “latent needs,” needs or wants that the customer has but is not consciously aware of. They then target their new product or service to fill that need or want. This process of listening to the customer allows the new product developers to make meaning of the consumer’s direct experience. Innovation and customer satisfaction can follow (Burchill & Brodie, 1997).

Apple – A Case Example

Apple is a great example of the power of understanding customer needs and providing products and services to fill those needs. Apple has become a cultural icon for our technological era and this digital age. As I wrote in this week’s forum post, Steve Jobs announced Apple’s newest, latest, greatest and COOLest product this past January with global fan-fare: the iPad.

In typical Apple marketing fashion, Apple required customers to wait several months for the iPad’s release. During this time Apple launched a marketing blitz, including an iPad frenzy on Twitter. iTunes has just launched an update for interfacing with the iPad, just in time for the iPad’s release. There was a Netflix app available for the new iPad even before the iPad’s release. Many people tweeted that they were downloading it in preparation for getting their iPad. There were 240,000 pre-orders awaiting the iPad.

Apple has found the “code” for “cool,” at least for this digital generation. Apple is a cultural phenomenon, as the MacHead photo illustrates – “the cult of mac.” There are many who are fervently dedicated. The iPod is jewelry in addition to music, an emotional as well as pragmatic piece of “cool,” coming in different colors and styles to match each person’s individual uniqueness. Apple understands its customers and has successfully tapped into their latent needs, capturing the market by storm.

Daniel and I picked up our iPads on Saturday, documenting and interviewing folks in line. On the whole, the Saturday crowd are early adopters who do respond to Apple’s advertising. There were 2 mechanical engineers and another student, among many others. The wait was short. The Mac Genius who waited on us was knowledgeable and responsive. We left with our questions answered, our iPads and leather cases in hand, and BIG SMILES.

The picture below shows four generations of Apple users: Stephanie, her Mom, her Grandmom, and her son. This was a family adventure for them. Their smiles and excitement might indicate a bit about their psychology. They said they considered this a bonding experience as they upgraded their technology together and supported one another. They were really enjoying playing with their “new toys.” 

Apple sold 300,000 iPads on Saturday according to reported figures. This first rush of purchases is the “early adopters” phase. Apple’s next marketing target is to reach more of the general population.

Downside of Manipulative Marketing
There is a downside to current day marketing. The episodes we watched from Frontline highlighted the hidden and manipulative side of marketing in our digital culture. For example, the use of “product placement.” Product placement is a form of embedded marketing.  Branded goods are placed, without explicit advertising, in the storyline of movies, TV shows, or other programming. This is often not disclosed at the time the product is being featured. (Wikipedia).

Consider that the star of this week’s episode of “Modern Family” is YES: The iPad.  On the eve of the iPad’s launch – Phil Dunphy, one of the main characters in this season’s runaway hit sitcom and touted to be the best new comedy of the year, celebrates his birthday. He is all encompassed in his desire for an iPad. His wife misses the early morning rush to stand in line at the Apple store, eventually getting there only to find they are “sold-out”. Message to audience: get there early, get there or you will miss out. Eventually, Phil’s son manages to get an iPad from one of Phil’s friends through social networking. Phil gets the iPad, everyone is happy, all is right with the world.

Advertising Age reports that this was just a very clever storyline; using Apple is like using a cultural icon, and not product placement. How it’s perceived is another thing though. Advertising Age states, “Even without Apple plunking down any cash, last night’s episode was tantamount to a huge wet kiss of approval for a product that has yet to be tested by actual consumer use (Steinberg, 2010).”

Whether it was product placement or not, it caused significant stirrings and fans perceived it as such reporting being furious. A typical post on IBDb forums stated, “Tuned in for comedy, sat through a 30 min iPad commercial (Bershad, 2010).” Consumers are becoming increasingly aware and critical of manipulative marketing, either actual or perceived.

Marketing’s Message: CONSUME

The message most marketing is driving home to the consumer is MORE IS BETTER. While this is a fallacy, the marketer’s job is to create more and more desire linking satisfaction or fulfillment to their product or service, to continuously consume.

In The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less, Barry Schwartz explores the world of excess and its impact on our daily lives. In a local supermarket, he found over 30,000 grocery items available, including 285 varieties of cookies. He concluded that having too many choices is bewildering, erodes our psychological well-being, and becomes restrictive rather than freeing (Schwartz, 2005).

So, in fact, this culture of consumerism is in a crisis of sorts. Product and service images come rushing towards us from every channel of media available, print, web, movies, tv, mail, email, and others. The message is clear and in many ways enticing. BUY! This onslaught has effected us and our culture. We have become a nation of consumers.

“If I were dictator of my own small island, it’s not capitalism that I would get rid of, it’s marketing. That ever-present force telling us we should be more beautiful, happier, drunker, skinnier, hipper, and whatever else it takes more money to attain.” ~ David “Oso” Sasaki

The Future of Consumerism

Internet marketing continues to develop forums for making the strong voice of consumers heard. Dee Dee Gordon, founder of Look-Look, an online trend tracker, focuses on the younger demographic, those 14 – 30. She is a key contributor to product development. She provides the voice for this younger digital generation by gathering data about their needs, wants, habits, and lifestyles, listening to them and describing their world.

Marketing will continue to be a major influence on our decisions. The more we understand our own motivations as well as the marketing techniques used by professionals, the more discerning we will become.

Source: catherineaseo.blogspot.com

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