Tag Archives: Fashion Jobs

How to Become Fashion Designer ( Part 2 ) – Fashion Industry Career Specializations

Fashion Industry Career Specializations -BREAK IT DOWN

Coming straight from fashion school, you might be thinking that as a fashion designer, you’ll have the opportunity to work with all types of apparel. But what you may not know is that generally, the fashion industry is split into categories, and then categories within categories. Basically, the apparel industry is very specialized.
The breakdown begins with price (which usually corresponds with quality). The lowest apparel classification is Discount, and at the height of fashion is Haute Couture:
  • Discount Fashion: These stores sell fashion merchandise that retails at a discounted price from what other apparel stores charge. Outlet malls or stores like Ross, Walmart, Target, or Conway are example of discount retailers that sell discount labels.

  • Budget / Mass Market Fashion: Mass market apparel usually consists of knock offs of higher priced designer fashions that are sold at low competitive prices to the masses. Old Navy, Forever 21, and Charlotte Russe are a few popular budget apparel labels. Department stores in this category include JC Penney, and Kohl’s. This fashion market usually retails for less than $100.

  • Moderate Fashion: These include nationally advertised apparel fashion brands such as Nine West, Gap, Abercrombie & Fitch, Express, and Zara. Examples of moderate department stores are Macy’s and Dillards. These apparel brands typically retail for less than $300.

  • Contemporary Fashion: More than just a specific price point, this classification is a fashion-forward image often aimed at women in their ’20s and early ’30s looking for trendy fashions priced more affordably than Designer pieces. BCBG, Betsey Johnson, Bebe, and Rebecca Taylor fall into the Contemporary fashion category, which usually retails for under $500.

  • Better Fashion: Also selling for less than $500, these collections use better quality fabric and styling than lower-priced brands. Armani Exchange, Jones New York and Anne Klein are a few examples of better-priced apparel lines.

  • Bridge Fashion: Priced under $1,000, these apparel fashion lines serve as a “bridge” between better and designer fashion categories. Bridge fashion includes names like Ellen Tracy, Dana Buchman, DKNY, Emporio Armani, and Lauren by Ralph Lauren.

  • Designer Fashion: True fashion designer collections typically sell for more than $1,000 per item. The fabrics, fit, details, and trims are superior to other ready-to-wear items. Some examples of designer labels are Gucci, Prada, Versace, Armani, and Chanel.

  • Haute Couture / Avant-garde Fashion: Also know as couture, these terms have been commonly misused by ready-to-wear brands. Haute Couture, or simply “couture” fashion designers sell custom, made-to-measure apparel, which costs tens of thousands of dollars, and is affordable only to a select few. Technically speaking, there are only ten official Haute Couture Fashion Houses including: Christian Dior, Jean Paul Gaultier, Chanel, and Givenchy. Avant-garde fashion designers produce high quality, one-of-a-kind garments that experiment with new fashion design concepts and push the envelope of popular apparel design.

Even within the fashion industry categories listed above, each apparel market is broken down into more specific career specializations. First, fashion companies are broken down by customer: men’s, women’s, children’s etc. Then are further divided by type of apparel: sportswear, eveningwear (special occasion), sleepwear etc. And then even fashion design teams are designated to specific areas like Wovens, Knits, Sweaters, Tops, Bottoms, Dresses, Outerwear and so on.

A discouraging thing to note about the fashion industry is that it is very difficult to move from one career category to another. If you start building your fashion design career with mass-market apparel companies, you’re going to face some barriers when you apply for that dream fashion designer job at Ralph Lauren. The same goes for apparel design specialties. If you’re experienced in designing children’s woven tops, chances are you won’t land a position designing women’s dresses. If you’re absolutely determined on making a switch in the fashion industry, you’re best bet is to start from the bottom in your desired career field and work your way up again.

Something else to consider is the different types of apparel manufacturers and retailers out there. There are fashion manufacturers who design and produce their own apparel designs, which are then sold to fashion retailers. These manufacturers do not have their own retail fashion stores. Examples include Shoshanna, Jones New York and Carmen Marc Valvo. There are also fashion manufacturers that own licenses for a variety of brands. For example, at the time of this writing, Phillips Van Heusen (PVH) owns Calvin Klein and IZOD, but licenses brands like DKNY, Sean Jean, and Kenneth Cole.

Then, there are fashion retailers that only sell merchandise purchased from manufacturers. These include stores like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. There are also many manufacturers that also have their own fashion retail locations such as Polo Ralph Lauren, Armani Exchange and Nicole Miller. Other apparel retail stores have their own product development teams and have merchandise manufactured specifically for their private label designs such as Gap, Old Navy, and Express. In addition to purchasing merchandise from outside manufacturers, many department stores also have their own private label collections. Examples are: I.N.C. (Macy’s), and Arizona Jeans (JC Penney).

Pre-Fall 2011

The largest employment opportunities out there lie within mass-market apparel companies. They often pay rather well to begin with, however these figures usually level off after a few years of experience. The higher-end fashion markets pay less to start, and work hours are longer, but the prestige you’ll receive from such reputable companies will do wonders for your resume.

Source: Desigernexus.com

 

Read also:


1 Comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Agency, Apparel Production Manager, Business, Commercial, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Digital Creative, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Lookbook, Luxury Brand, Magazines, Make-Up Artist, Management, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Manager, Merchandising, Motionbook, Networking, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, PR Manager, Presentation, Print, Production Pattern Maker, Publicity, Research, Sales Representative, Target Market, Technical Designer, Television, Trends, Viral Campaign, Window Display

How to Become Fashion Designer (Part 1) – Creating a Competitive Edge in the Fashion Industry

Creating a Competitive Edge in the Fashion Industry



Here you are, about to enter the real world with your fashion portfolio full of stunning design illustrations and a head full of hopes. I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but that glamorous perception of the apparel industry is a myth, and that vision of yourself as a famous fashion designer with your own clothing line is almost close to impossible to reach. The actual chances of that are probably the same as becoming a movie star.
High Fashion by Karl Lagerfeld 01
This doesn’t mean you won’t become a successful apparel designer working for a company – it means that your chances of becoming the glamorous clichè portrayal of a fashion designer are quite slim. Not only do you have to compete with the already established professional apparel designers, but nowadays throw pop singers, celebrities, and TV stars into the mix. There is a better chance that you’ll end up working for an established fashion designer’s collection or as a designer for the next big celebrity’s apparel line.
High Fashion by Karl Lagerfeld 05

If this sounds like old news to you, then congratulations – you’re a step ahead of the game because you already know what you’re getting into. If what I just said comes as a total surprise, take a moment to let reality sink in – and then keep reading. In either case, we want to give you the info you need to know to prepare yourself for what lies ahead. In this “miniseries” of fashion career articles we are going to cover:

High Fashion by Karl Lagerfeld 03

High Fashion by Karl Lagerfeld 04

All the articles from the list above help give you that much-needed competitive edge and increase your chances of getting where you want to go within the fashion industry. Basically, we want to prepare you as much as possible for a career in fashion, so take it from fashion designers who have been in your shoes, and soak it up!

Source: Designernexus.com

1 Comment

Filed under Apparel Production Manager, Business, Communications Manager, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Industry, Fashion Internship, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Model, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Themes, Luxury Brand, Make-Up Artist, Management, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Manager, Merchandising, Networking, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, PR Manager, Production Pattern Maker, Publicity, Sales Representative, Target Market, Technical Designer, Trends

Fashion Designer Career Information

Fashion Designers Overview

Fashion designers with a 2-year degree or 4-year degree in fashion design who are knowledgeable in fashion trends, fabric, and textiles are what employers are looking for. Due to the creativity and glamour of the job, there is a lot of competition to become a fashion designer. Most jobs for fashion designers are in California and New York.

Nature of the Work for Fashion Designers

Fashion Designers
Fashion designers study fashion trends, sketch designs of clothing and accessories, select colors and fabrics, and oversee the final production of their designs in order to produce clothing items and accessories that consumers want to purchase. Fashion designers can work in men’s, women’s, and children’s apparel, including intimate apparel and maternity wear.


Many fashion designers specialize in clothing, footwear or accessories but some enjoy creating designs for all three. Between 18 and 24 months, fashion designers begin their design process and turn it into a final production. A fashion designer’s first step is to research trends in current fashion and to predict the trends that will follow. Whether they use trend reports or do their own research, fashion designers rely on the research to indicate what styles, colors, and fabrics will be popular in the upcoming season.

Trend reports and research are also important to textile manufacturers who use the information to begin designing patterns and fabric simultaneously with the fashion designer who is sketching the design. Once a fashion designer’s sketch is complete, the fashion designer and manufacturer meet to discuss fabric and pattern choices.

A prototype is created once the design and fabric are agreed upon which uses cheaper materials as a model to make any necessary adjustments.

Once a fashion designer make a decision, article samples are made and distributed to clothing retailers. Fashion designers can also see their design at fashion and trade shows throughout the year.

Though many fashion designers sketch by hand, many use computer-aided design (CAD) to translate the sketches into the computer where fashion designers can view their designs on virtual models.

The involvement of a fashion designer depends on the size of the design firm and experience. For large design firms, fashion designers usually take on the role as lead designer who create designs, choose colors and fabric and oversee the technical designers responsible for turning the idea into a final product. Large firms may also employ their own pattern makers and tailors as well. For fashion designers working in smaller firms, a bulk of their work includes overseeing technical aspects, pattern making, and sewing. Some fashion designers choose to work for apparel wholesalers or manufacturers. This involves fashion designers to design for the masses where designs come in various colors and sizes.

Many fashion designers are also self-employed and design for individual clients as well as those who sell their designs to retail or specialty stores. Fashion designers in costume design for motion picture, performing arts or television productions perform extensive research on certain styles and eras and then draw sketches, select fabrics and oversee production. They may also be restricted to a costume budget.

Fashion designers employed by manufacturing establishments, wholesalers, or design firms will usually work normal and regular hours while those who freelance can either work by job or under a contract. Freelance fashion designers can work long hours in smaller environments where pressure is intense from clients. Whether fashion designers work in large firms, small firms, or freelance, long hours will occasionally be necessary for all fashion designer who have to meet deadlines or prepare for fashion shows.

Communication is essential for fashion designers who are constantly dealing with suppliers, customers and manufactures.

Fashion designers may also need to travel for fashion shows or to get fabric.

Training, Other Qualifications and Advancement for Fashion Designers

A fashion designer typically needs an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree in fashion design in order to find employment. Fashion designers who may be thinking about running their own business or store may also combine a fashion design degree with a business,marketing, or fashion merchandising degree. Typical courses for an associate or bachelor’s degree in fashion design includes color, textiles, sewing and tailoring, pattern making, fashion history and computer-aided design (CAD). Taking courses in human anatomy, mathematics, and psychology can also be useful for understanding the body and how to run a company.

Around 300 postsecondary institutions with programs in art and design are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. Most schools expect a basic art or design course to be completed before formal admittance into a program is allowed. Sketches may also be requested before admittance.

Interning, working at manufacturing firms, working at retail stores or with a personal stylist can help fashion designers learn the necessary skills of the industry.

Those who want to become successful fashion designers can also enter their designs into amateur or student contents.

Fashion designers must have a strong aesthetic, good communication skills, be able to problem solve and sketch. A good portfolio is also important for an aspiring fashion designer to have. The ability to work well in teams is also important for fashion designers who will remain in contact with manufacturers, supplies, and buyers.

Though design is a big part of becoming a fashion designer, they must also be knowledgeable in pattern making and sewing. Knowledge of these skills will make it easier for fashion designers to instruct others on how garments should be constructed.

Those starting out as fashion designers usually begin as sketching assistants for pattern markers. After working for an experienced designer, fashion designers may be able to advance to such positions as design department head or chief designer.

Some fashion designers also go on to start their own business or begin selling their designs to stores.

Top 10 Most Popular Fashion / Apparel Schools

1. Fashion Institute of Technology (New York, New York)
2. The Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising – Los Angeles (Los Angeles, California)
3. The New School (New York, New York)
4. Academy of Art University (San Francisco, California)
5. International Academy of Design and Technology (Multiple Campus Locations)
6. Iowa State University (Ames, Iowa)
7. Katharine Gibbs School – New York City (New York, New York)
8. Savannah College of Art and Design (Savannah, Georgia)
9. The Illinois Institute of Art – Chicago (Chicago, Illinois)
10. Virginia Commonwealth University – Richmond (Richmond, Virginia)

See All Fashion/Apparel Design Schools

Online School: The Art Institute of Pittsburgh – Online Division

Employment and Job Outlook for Fashion Designers

Number of People in Profession

15,780

Changing Employment (2008-2018)

Employment is projected to little or no change (decrease or increase by 2%).

Job Opportunities & Competition

May face, or can expect, keen competition for job opportunities. Job openings may be fewer than job seekers.

About 15,780 jobs are held by fashion designers, 31 percent work for apparel, piece goods, and wholesalers while 13 percent work for apparel manufacturers.

With a high demand for clothing, footwear, and accessories, some new jobs may open for fashion designers. Middle-income consumers are demanding affordable yet stylish clothing which means fashion designers will be needed in apparel wholesalers.

Since most apparel manufacturing is done overseas, cut and sew manufacturing jobs will likely decline.

Design firms that design mass-market clothing in department stores and retail stores will offer the most job opportunities for fashion designers.

Earnings and Salary for Fashion Designers

Median annual wages for salaried fashion designers are $64,260. The middle 50 percent earn between $44,110 and $90,020. The lowest 10 percent earn less than $32,320, and the highest 10 percent earn more than $130,900.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook

Source: Campusexplorer.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Agency, Apparel Production Manager, Beachwear, Business, Colours, Costume Design, Cutting Assistant, Design, Eco Fashion, Eco Trends, Fabric Buyer, Fabric Quality Control Manager, Fashion, Fashion Coordinator, Fashion Design Production, Fashion Designer, Fashion Hair Stylist, Fashion Industry, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Journalist, Fashion Marketeer, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Mercendising, Fashion Photographer, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Fashion Themes, Hair, Lingerie, Make-Up, Make-Up Artist, Market Research, Men's Fashion, Merchandising, Niche Market, Personal Stylist, Photographer, Production Pattern Maker, Research, Sales Representative, Shoes, Sunglasses, Swimwear, Target Market, Technical Designer, Trends

A Preview of Karlie Kloss in Dior Spring 2011 Ad Campaign

 

A Preview of Karlie Kloss in Dior Spring 2011 Ad Campaign

Along with Chanel Iman, sixteen year old runway model Karlie Kloss has caught the eye of every designer from Jason Wu, Hermes, Marc Jacobs, to everyone you could possibly name. As an aspiring medical school student this girl is definitely rocking the runways and getting her face on every ad possible! For this Spring 2011 expect to see Kloss as the face of Dior, let’s just say this is going to be one good season!

A Preview of Karlie Kloss in Dior Spring 2011 Ad Campaign

represented by next models ny, karlie kloss appears for the spring dior campaign. clad in the iconic fashion houses seaside inspired collection, we see kloss against a teal studio backdrop along with element of the wilderness, including a branch & simulated silhouettes of palm trees. creatively, the fall campaign that kloss did last season had much more style validity for me; that said, the collection was fun & feminine- two elements which are well captured here. shot by steven meisel, this is karlie’s third dior campaign in a row. a feat not many models are able to accomplish, especially so early on in their career. well executed, great direction.

A Preview of Karlie Kloss in Dior Spring 2011 Ad Campaign

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Business, Celebrity, Design, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Show, Luxury Brand, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Photo Shoot, Presentation, Product Advertising, Promotion, Publicity, Target Market

Google Boutiques.com, a World of Fashion

Google unveils a new shopping portal, Boutiques.com. It showcases the power of search in the world of fashion. You can shop and choose from a variety of styles, designs and collections of famous designers and stylists. Shoppers can easily catch up with the trend because it allows users to save likes or dislikes in the site.

Shopping is the watchword today. Almost everyone around the globe is on a Shopping spree. Google understands this and thus, has launched a new shopping portal entitled Boutiques.com to add on to its almost full kitty of world class products and services. The portal, as they say, combines the goodness of both social and search. It allows for finding and discovering styles and fashions collections that have been put together by renowned celebrities, designers, stylists and fashion experts, to name a few.

Through this site, Google will be able to analyze the tastes of consumers by ways of a number of clicks, Google Trend data, computer vision and machine learning technology and ultimately, letting them know the entire world of fashion. As is the case with Youtube,  whenever a user logs into his/her account, the site would know the user’s taste for fashion and recommend those results that suit the taste.

Google got the technology from its acquisition of Like.com, along with which came the technology team behind it. They were already working hard on that and had also launched a site of their own called WhatToWear.com. The team at Google now consists of PhDs in Computer Science and Fashion Designers and Stylists. In fact, it is an amalgamation of computer nerds and fashion nerds. Altogether, the team is working on creating a new route to browse, find and buy world class fashion under one roof.

Source: Marketingconversation.com by ROBIN PANGILINAN

Leave a comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Business, Digital Marketing, E-Commerce, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Retailer, Interactive Campaign, Interactive Marketing, Interactive Marketing Online, Internet Marketing, Luxury Brand, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Media Outlet, Merchandising, Methodology, New Product Marketing, Niche Market, Online, Online Marketing, Online Product Marketing, Online Shopping, Place, Price, Product, Product Advertising, Product Placement, Promotion, Publicity, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research, Research, Social Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Target Market, Technology, Trends, Web Marketing, Website, Window Display

About Fashion Marketing

Very few industries influence our everyday lives as thoroughly as fashion marketing. From personal style to home style, it would be impossible to turn on the television, open a magazine or surf the Internet without some type of fashion targeting our senses.

History

  • From the flappers in the ’20s showing women how life could be, to the home improvement shows on television today, fashion has always been an important part of our daily lives. Before the advancements of the current media outlets, fashions were marketed in newspapers, magazines and other print media. With the advent of television, the fashion world exploded with new ways to market to the masses.
  • Significance

  • The fashion industry dictates style and creates millions of jobs worldwide. Fashion marketing is the face of this global giant, influencing people of every walk of life. From the style of our hair to the tip of our shoes to the colors in our home, fashion marketing plays a significant role. Whether you choose to follow the trends, your choices in the marketplace are determined by these corporate conglomerates.
  • Function

  • Once a style has been determined by the designers and the corporations, the marketing arm of fashion begins to create the vision for the public. Product placement in popular television shows, commercials, online and magazine ads, as well as billboards and newspaper articles are all dedicated to creating desire for this season’s trends.
  • Effects

  • After the industry establishes a trend, the general public makes purchasing decisions based on the choices made available by the fashion marketing machine. As popularity grows in a certain sector, the marketing venues expand. If a separate item can be created from the acceptance of one style, then the door is open for more development and the cycle continues. The end result is reflected in our individual style and in the way we live.

  • Potential

  • The efforts of one designer can have the potential to influence a generation. Consider the possibilities a new type of tennis shoe or backpack might have on the buying habits of young people. Think about the pictures we see daily of rail thin models and how this portrayal affects self-image. The fashion marketing industry not only helps create trends, but strongly affects how we see ourselves and our world.
  • Original Source: eHow By Katherine Kally, eHow Contributor

    Leave a comment

    Filed under Advertising, Business, Commercial, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketing, Internet Marketing, Magazines, Marketing, Media Outlet, Merchandising, Product Placement, Promotion, Target Market

    Fashion Career Information

    Many do not realize it, but there are a variety of careers in fashion to choose from–the field is not limited to designers and models.

    Design

  • Fashion designers work with all different types of fashion, from bridal gowns to swimwear. A degree from a fine arts university or design institute, such as the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM) in L.A. or Parsons in New York City, is the best way to get into this career.
  • Modeling

  • Modeling is one of the most sought after fashion careers, but it is not easy to attain or sustain. Models must meet strict requirements to get work, and the industry is driven purely by aesthetics.
  • Management

  • Modeling agents may also represent makeup artists, actors and fashion photographers. There is work for modeling managers around the world, and many even start their own management companies as opposed to working for established firms, such as Ford or Elite Models.
  • Event Production

  • Fashion show producers typically work in major cities such as London, Paris, New York City and Los Angeles, but there is work available in smaller markets too. Production companies, such as Sobol in Miami, Florida, are responsible for planning and executing fashion shows and events.
  • Publicity and Marketing

  • Fashion publicists and marketing experts generally work with fashion brands, designers and show producers to get them media attention and increase public awareness. Some publicists also work exclusively with famous models.
  • Photography

  • Fashion photographers, such as Jason Christopher, Derek Blanks and Richard Warren, help models develop portfolios, but they also shoot work for magazines and commercial websites. Those who take this fashion career path can find work around the world, in cities of all sizes.

    Original Source: eHow By Marie Dockett, eHow Contributor

  • Leave a comment

    Filed under Advertising, Agency, Business, Design, Fashion, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Retailer, Fashion Show, Fashion Stylist, Management, Marketing, Merchandising, Photographer, Producer, Promotion, Publicity