Tag Archives: Fashion Trends 2011

Hair and make-up trends for 2011 from ‘Down Under’

What will be the big hair and make-up trends this year?

FACING FACTS:

Perth make-up artist Yvette Gray says bright colours should be your beauty staple for 2011.

“Looking at what was on the catwalk at New York Fashion Week, there is a lot of citrus and coral on the eyes,” she says.

“Those colours need to be paired with nude lips and cheeks, otherwise the look is way too much.

“There were also a lot of pale white or soft nude eyes, generally teamed up with cantaloupe and watermelon tones on the lips.”

We will also see a new take on the classic smoky eye this year.

“It is always a strong look that never dates but it will be modernised for 2011 by adding a metallic finish to the eye,” Ms Gray says.

“It’s a great evening look.”

Napoleon Perdis national creative team leader Kate Squires says green is also emerging as a key trend.

“The arresting shade evokes so many things – from money to Mother Nature – but, for us, green shadow and liner on the eyes is also undeniably glamorous, especially when paired with glowing skin, contoured cheeks and pinkish lips,” Ms Squires says.

Ms Squires says it is important not to get so caught up with colour that you forget the basics.

“No make-up technique or look is complete without the perfect base and a lot of women still find this hard to achieve,” she says.

“It’s all in the priming. As Napoleon would say ‘not to prime is a crime’.”

MAC senior artist Nicole Thompson says glossy skin texture will be pivotal in the coming seasons.

“We are seeing much less of a heavy foundation look,” she says.

“It is becoming more and more popular – and generally looks much more flattering – when you can actually see your skin through your make-up. This is especially true if you want to play with the bright colour trend.

“Keep the rest of your make-up really pared back and natural to keep the look modern and not trashy.”

Ms Thompson suggests wiping make-up off your eyelids and cheekbones to reveal your natural skin colour and adding gloss accents to the high points of the face.

HAIR TODAY:

Toni & Guy national educator and Subiaco salon owner Tracey Laing says the hottest hair trend for 2011 is the bold, graphic cut.

“Those shapes have got a bit of a power chic attitude, and they’re a bit edgy,” she says.

Ms Laing says classic shapes like the bob will be modernised with bold fringes, a lot of texture and layers.

“Rather than thinking Courtney Love, though, this look will be a lot more finished,” she says.

“It’s a lot more glamorous and high fashion while still being a bit more disordered and textured.”

2011 Hairstyles ImageBalayage was a big trend last year but Ms Laing says 2011 will be all about colour to complement the cut.

“There won’t be one dominant colour,” she says. “The key will be fresh, expensive and glamorous-looking colour that has good tone to it.

“The look we’re seeing is moving towards glossy, healthy colours.”

We’ll be seeing more voluminous hair on the streets and she predicts the topknot will definitely carry into the new year.

“It does suit most face shapes and ages,” she says.

NAILING IT:

Celebrity manicurist Ali Veras, who has shaped the nails of Cate Blanchett, Nicole Kidman and Kylie Minogue, says nails will be bright and playful in 2011.

“Bright and bold shades of turquoise, tomato red, fuchsia and coral are all the rage this season and will make fingers and toes pop,” she says.

“I am really loving Zoya’s new Flash summer collection, which includes the perfect turquoise cream, a vivid tangerine and a cherry red.”

You don’t necessarily have to use the same polish on your toes and fingers, she says.

“Many of my clients like a more neutral or pale shade on their nails and take a more anything goes approach to their toes.”

Text Source: au.news.yahoo.com

 

If you like to view more articles on Hairstyles, visit also:

  1. STYLISH MEDIUM LENGHT HAIRSTYLES
  2. 2011 HAIR TRENDS – HAIRSTYLES FOR WOMEN and
  3. ALTERNATIVE HAIR SHOW 2011

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Spring / Summer 2011 Fashionable Themes

Interfiliere: Spring / Summer 2011 trend motifs

Interfiliere, a fashion industry body dedicated to lingerie and beachwear correctly peg Spring 2011’s fashion trends as an evolution of several recent fashion trends; key amongst them is the continued reinterpretation of classic styles along all heavily influenced by the ‘lingerie as outerwear’ trend that Fashionising.com has been touting for some time now.

Key look: loungerie

For the latter, they’ve coined a new term: loungerie. With the elements of lingerie, be it girly or overtly sexual, so prominent in street fashion, Interfiliere see Spring 2011’s key street wear trends as a mixture between lingerie, swimwear and streetwear (which they group as loungewear), and lingerie. Hence the portmanteau.

In their own words:

The new Loungerie takes a leaf out of, and gets the best of, lingerie for an alternative, parallel wardrobe; [one that is] light, intimate, and impossible to “classify.”

loungerie

Over-all themes

Lingerie as street wear aside, there are four themes that Interfiliere believe will be key to Spring / Summer 2011 fashion trends:

Tendresse (fondness)

spring 2011 fondness

An atmosphere heavily loaded with, memories but reinvented by using, technical innovations. To maintain the feeling of softness and a nostalgia of charm, there are sophisticated constructions, digital prints, placed jacquards, audacious accents, and subtle featherweight effects, silks, fine cottons, blends.

Then there are the refined, luxury lines of coordinates made to last: it’s the triumphant return of the camisole, bodices, teddies: all expressions of an eternal seduction.

spring 2011 fondness

Antidote

spring 2011 antidote

Happiness lies in non conformity. It’s not a question of being good or reasonable, but the passion colours evoke, the explosions of prints, geometrical accents, Indian flowers, folk music kitsch, cartoon influences and the naive primitives that all mix create a wild patchwork of fashion.

A liberated celebration of all that everyday life is about. Amusing creativity, beachwear influences, mixes of ethnic and otherworld, ardour and femininity, the whole trend being based on strong lines.

spring 2011 antidote

Oasis

spring 2011 oasis

Pleasure gorged on the sun and freshness you’ll want from Spring / Summer 2011.

On the one hand, the exotic: exuberant nature inspired by Gauguin, luxuriant foliage and cat-like beachwear motifs. On the other hand, the desert: a landscape of sand, primitive embroideries, Berber stripes, beautiful laces patinated by the years, ikats and metal accents.

For ample shapes such as caftans or djellabahs, dry knits, charming linens and cottons for the loungerie trend.

spring 2011 oasis

Sublime

spring 2011 sublime

The essence of a new luxury, ostentatious and astonishing with a hint of theatrical and urban roughness.

Haute couture meets high-tech. The scene is ostentatious, emphatically astonishing, and unique. In the corridors of this new theatricality surface effects, contrasts of opaque and transparency. Think transfer prints, graphics and bondageaccents.

This is the essence of the new luxury, exceptional beauty ready to conquer the land of modernity.

spring 2011 sublime

Source: Fashionising.com by Daniel P Dykes

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Fashion for Men in Suits: Fashionable Suit Styles for 2011

Men’s fashion trends are greatly different to women’s. They exist, yes. But their cycle moves much slower. Nowhere is that truer then of men’s suit trends. While there are distinct styles of suits that feature amongst 2011’s fashion trends I should note from the get-go that they’re not unique to the year – in fact, many of the key looks you’ll find in this guide will still be in-fashion come 2012 and beyond. Which is a great thing – it means you can afford to spend more on a suit thus buying a quality piece of workmanship that you’ll still be able to wear for many a year to come. The same can’t be said of most fashion trends.

But what styles, cuts and cloths should you be looking for? Read on to find out.

2011 suit

Read more on men’s suit trends
  • Modern Suit Styles
  • Double Breasted Suits
  • Three Piece Suits
  • On Trend Suit Fabrics and Patterns
  • Buying the Perfect Suit

While suiting and formal-wear trends for men aren’t seasonal (unless, of course, you’re talking about the weight of the cloth) and play out over several years, 2011 and 2012 continue the dominance of two qualities that any modern suit you invest in should aspire to have:

  1. classicism
  2. masculinity

Let’s deal with them both.

The classic part is the easy part. A good suit for this decade will take the best elements from the peak eras of men’s suiting (think the formality of the Victorian era, the savoir faire of the 1930s and, for some cuts, the skinny detailing of the 1960s) and apply them to a modern silhouette.

The masculinity of a suit is less easy to define; one can’t simply enter a tailors and say you want a suit infused with masculinity. Sadly, it doesn’t work that way. Instead, suits for 2011 and 2012 are all about a cut that compliments the male physique, a suit that broadens the shoulders and trims the waist highlighting (or at least implying) an exercised body. In short, it’s about a cut of a suit that makes you, the wearer, feel more masculine and more confident. And feeling really is key. To some the masculine element will be a suit that is clean cut, with few flourishes, to others it’s means a suit full of extra details that it takes a certain attitude to pull off well (I’d say that Tom Ford’s suits fall into the latter camp – they’re highly masculine, but are made for a gent with a certain kind of attitude to life).

So knowing the fact that you’re looking for something both masculine and classic, what are the technical elements you’re looking for?

Suit Cuts: On-Trend Styles and Designs

You’ll find terms such as skinny and slim peppered throughout this tailoring trends guide, but fear not: I’m not referring to the ‘skinny boy’ suit popular into 2008 / 2009; with proponents of that style having themselves moved on to other styles, the skinny boy suit has had it’s day. But, despite this, the terms of skinny and slim remain simply because unstructured, boxy suit cuts are out of fashion. So there, from the get go, as we describe the suit cuts you should be looking for in 2011 and beyond we have to say it: you’re looking for a slim cut; and I use slim as opposed to skinny to describe the on-trend cut as your investment in a good suit should be in something that is neither overly-skinny nor overly boxy, but instead a suit cut that would appeal to a military officer, one that accents a sense of the masculine through three key silhouette elements:

  1. broad shoulders
  2. a slim waist
  3. slim trousers

With those three attributes in mind, let’s look at the actual cuts that are in fashion:

Single breasted suits

It seems superfluous to include single breasted suits in a trend article given they are never out of fashion. But despite being the default style, they’re also the dominant, on-trend suit cut for 2011 and 2012. This sits in contrast to the double breasted suit being the on-trend cut during 2009 and 2010.

The cut of the single breasted suit has evolved for 2011 / 2012 to have two dominant styles:

The sleek cut

The first of the two dominant single-breasted suit styles for 2011 is what I term a sleek cut. This is the suit for the slick chap who wears his suits in something of a toned down way. They’re still impeccably made and they’re never casual, but when it comes time to tick the masculinity box I referred to earlier, this suit is for the chap who does so with restraint.

To give you an instant mental picture of the sleek cut suit in 2011 and 2012, think of it as inspired by the continuing popularity of all things 1960s, a suit very akin to what the likes of Mad Men‘s Don Draper wears into the office though one cut with a trimmer waist.

don draper suit

If a sleek cut, single breasted suit is what you want to add to your wardrobe then you’re after the following details:

  • slim to medium sized notched lapels or a shawl
  • the upper button should be positioned around your navel
  • a breast pocket that accommodates nothing more than a pocket square (as opposed to a elegantly folded pocket handkerchief) – contrast Don Draper’s pocket square to the pocket handkerchief’s featured in the Tom Ford pictures below if the difference is not immediately obvious to you

The confidence cut

I’m still looking for the perfect term to describe this cut of suit. At first I’d termed it the flair cut, but it took only a moment to realise that that would imply that I was advocating a return to flared trousers and suits. Nothing could be further from the truth. Instead flair was meant to describe the extra, potentially overt, details it has; this is a cut of suit for a gent who can comfortably wear those extra little details that Joe Average generally lacks the confidence to wear out of fear of derision.

So for those of you who are looking for that extra something, both in their clothing and in their life, I proffer up the (potentially temporarily named) confidence cut. As with all fashionable men’s suits for 2011 and 2012 it’s cut that’s about the male physique and the revival of classic suiting elements. Unlike the previous ‘sleek cut’ single breasted suit described, however, it features one additional key attribute: instead of a slim to medium notched lapel, 2011’s confidence suit cut is all about peaked lapels. In this regard, the suit cut sits as something of a 1930s and 1970s revival – back then peaked lapels were the only kind worth having.

peaked single breasted suit
A single breasted suit with dual buttons and pointed lapels.

With its obvious appeal, the confidence cut can be more than just a single breasted suit cut, however. When it comes to on-trend double breasted suits, it’s also the dominant cut.

Double breasted suits and sportscoats

If there’s one cut that I’m glad I’ve been able to return to my wardrobe it’s the modern, double-breasted suit. Those of you who recall the last time that double breasted suits and sports coats were in fashion may remember the boxy cut it inevitably came with. Fear not, that cut has gone. In its place is one that defies what double breasted suits were originally designed to do: hide a plump figure. Instead they’re now designed to accent and to heighten the perfect masculine shape: the V-shaped, well worked body.

Incidentally, if you’re still in possession of a double breasted suit from an earlier era, take it off to your tailor to refresh its life.

tom ford suit
Double breasted Tom Ford suits with pointed / peak lapels

If you’re purchasing off-the-rack you’ll note that there are a good number of double breasted suits available to you, each cut to a slightly different variation. What then should you look for? duke of windsor suitSuits for 2011 and 2012 are all about the same attributes that I keep reiterating: a cut that broadens the shoulders and slims the waist. With double breasted suits you also want to figure in to the overall affect what I earlier dubbed the confidence cut. And that means two additional things for a double breasted suit:

  1. that it has peaked lapels
  2. that its breast pocket is cut to accommodate a pocket handkerchief

As you can see from the picture to the right, the latter mention of a pocket handkerchief is less a requirement and more of a desirable flourish – the added attention to detail of a pocket handkerchief can not only make a look (and would make this one), it can be that one point that sets you apart in a crowded room, particularly when that room is full of chaps wearing their suit with disdain or if they spend their days stuck behind a desk. But the vintage photograph you see also leads to one other additional styling tip: when purchasing a double-breasted suit the “Kent” cut is the in-fashion cut. Named after a style popularised by the The Prince George, Duke of Kent, it’s a cut of double breasted suits where a longer lapel line extends into the waist. That is to say: the part of the double breasted suit that sits on the front buttons on the waist line (as pictured on the Duke of Windsor, right). This small detail will help convey you as being taller than you may actually be and, if cut correctly, also imply that you have a trim waist. You’ll find the Kent suit cut is offered by a number of designers, including D&G (pictured below), and all good tailors.

d&g suit
Double breasted Kent cut D&G suits, please forgive them for the snow boots but do note the differing lapels: a shawl lapel on the left and a pointed / peaked lapel on the right – these two styles are discussed later.

Sack suit cut

For every trend there is an anti-trend.

Despite suits in 2011 and 2012 being all about a cut that heightens a look of masculinity, this is still a world in which every day has become something of a dress-down-Friday. Thus a style of suit is gaining popularity that bucks the masculinity-focussed elements of suiting and instead takes its lead from the come back of all things vintage.

The neo-sack suit sports the rolled shoulders that inspired the cut’s name (hence the suit’s shoulders roll down the wearer’s, like a sack would) though with a slimmer waist than the cut of suit originally had, though not as slim as what’s on-trend.

sack suit
Two sack suits from Polo Ralph Lauren.

Three-piece suits

Let’s face it: the waistcoat has long been a dead item for most men, but thanks to a resurgence in its popularity in men’s street wear the waistcoat is back with vengeance. And it’s back as a statement piece, a piece that says that you, the wearer, is sartorially savvy and are likely to be a cut above your peers.

Having recently returned to men’s wardrobes as a standalone piece to be worn casually, the waistcoat’s new found popularity means the return of the three piece suit.

The three-piece in 2011 / 2012 is all about cohesion; forget the mismatching style prevalent in the early parts of the 20th Century and in the 1980s. The return of the three-piece means that the waistcoat has to be cohesive and, thus, in the same fabric as the suit’s other two pieces.

Tip: If you do want to venture outside the realm of three matching pieces, stick to a cohesive colour palette; you may want to pair a pinstripe black suit with a pinstripe charcoal waistcoat. Personally I’d embellish a two-piece suit with a cotton or wool sweater vest / tank top as opposed to a mismatching waistcoat.

On selecting the perfect three-piece suit I’d recommend looking for a waistcoat whose V shape breaks somewhere between the sternum and the base of the rib cage. I’ve seen waistcoats that accompany three piece suits from the likes of Giorgio Armani which don’t sport the V shape at all, simply finishing just under the collar; these are going to be a lot harder to wear and ignore the conservative subtlety this revival depends upon. Moreover, such a large waistcoat won’t convey a slim waist as effectively as one with a deeper neck, though they may imply more height on a particular figure.

three piece suit
A three piece suit from Simon Spurr. Note the peak lapels and flourish to the peak handkerchief while overlooking the fact that the second top button is undone: this is a mistake, the fact that the lowest button isn’t done up isn’t, however.

The Fabric / Suit Cloth

As we’ve returned to the classics with double breasted and three-piece suits, then it should come as no surprise that classic cloths, patterns and fabrics are those most sought after. As an added bonus, adding classic cloths to your wardrobe allows for the inclusions of fabrics and colours that you mightn’t otherwise have as an option (and helps you steer away from having the typical men’s wardrobe: black, grey, navy).

Which fabric cloth should you pick?

The fabric you buy your suit in will be on of the biggest factors in the price you pay, but selecting the right fabric will also play a big factor in whether you buy an investment piece or a one season wonder.

wool suit
Wool
The clear favourite for suits, but pick carefully. I’ve seen some very expensive wool suits fall apart within a few years due to the cloth being a terrible blend. My personal preference is towards a super-wool, with a thread count somewhere between 120 and 150. I tend towards 150 as it’s often works on both cold and hot days. If you live, however, in more extreme climates you’ll need both Winter (200 thread count) and Summer (100 thread count) suits in wool.
cotton suitCotton
Cotton can make a beautiful suit, but make no mistake it’s best only as an informal or fashion suit and, unlike wool, is going to crease like anything. I find it best in colours which aren’t black or grey, and your preference should be towards navy and tan colours. It’s definitely a spring / summer suit (and is great for weddings and other functions of the season) and many a European fashion house, as well as those who tailor in Europe, will have cotton suits amongst their spring / summer range. I’ve seen quality cotton suits sold off the rack amongst the ranges of Zegna and Ralph Lauren’s Black Label.
linen suit
Linen
So many men simply don’t understand linen, and it’s often those of us who have had the luck of a childhood in Europe that may ever truly appreciate it. But a linen suit can be perfect for those hot, humid summer days. Try wearing a cotton or wool suit once the mercury pushes past 30 Celsius / 85 Fahrenheit and you’ll see what I mean. Because of its nature, line makes a great summer suit and colours such as whites and creams and particularly suited.One final note on linen: don’t be scared of linen’s penchant for creasing, it’s all a part of the fabric’s charm.
velvet suit
Velvet
While we’ve looked at desirable fabric patterns for suits below, make a mental note now that there is also room in your wardrobe for a statement cloth – that is, a piece crafted out of a cloth that is itself the attention grabbing detail. The most on-trend cloth for this comes to us courtesy ofmen’s velvet. Follow the link to read more but, in essence: velvet makes a luxurious statement piece suited to evening wear, but most men will find it easier to wear the cloth in the form of a sports coat as opposed to a full suit.

Which patterns should you pick?

For those looking to invest in a suit that isn’t made in a solid colour, the following are classic suit patterns perfect for 2011 and beyond, but don’t forget that you can also work these same cloth patterns into components of men’s suiting without making it an actual suit; that is, sportcoats, blazers and trousers. In no particular order, these are the dominant suit cloths / patterns available for 2011 and 2012 that sit at the more conservative end of the spectrum.

Glen plaid
tom ford glen plaid

A mixture of checks, the Glen plaid (or Glen Urquhart plaid) has risen to become the most fashionable of all suit fabric patterns. It is actually a fabric of patterns, meaning that it can be woven into a great many colour and pattern size combinations. Of those, the Prince of Wales pattern is amongst the most popular (the Prince of Wales check is a combination of red, cream, black and gray), and like so many things sartorial derives its name from the late Duke of Windsor.

Glen plaid tends to work best in grey tones, with the checks in lighter shades currently amongst the most popular. It’s an autumn (fall) / winter pattern as it’s best when made out of wool.

Damier check
damier check suit

Another fabric pattern that has regained popularity of late, the damier check wasn’t invented by Louis Vuitton but has certainly been popularised by the fashion house as a menswear offering all the same.

In essence it’s akin to a gingham, but to call it that would be to turn you off the pattern altogether. Instead, think of it in dark, masculine colours without the white base typical of a gingham check. Because it is a rather busy pattern, however, this is one pattern that lends itself better to a fashionable sportscoat (paired with un-patterned trousers) then it does to a full suit.

Herringbone
herringbone suit

Herringbone has become something of the third place pattern in men’s suiting; solid colours take out first place and pinstripes second. While the fashionable fabric for 2011 / 2012 is a Glen plaid, herringbone remains something of the more conservative choice.

Traditionally made from wool, herringbone works best with suits autumn (fall) / winter and is typically produced in a alternating black / white colour combination. While the traditional colour way, this gives an overall bolder look and I’d recommend opting for a charcoal / light grey colour combination if you don’t find the black and white combination pleasing to your eye.

Harris Tweed
harris tweed

Harris Tweed has been making something of a come back for the past year or two – some put it down to the fact that the BBC opted to dress the latest incarnation of Doctor Who in it. We put it down to the fact that, in an age where everything old is new again, it was simply time for a comeback.

It’s place as a fashionable pattern is unique as Harris Tweed is both pattern and fabric, its fabric being a tweed and its pattern a mixture of herringbone and twill (the latter gives the alternating vertical lines you can see in the picture above).

Best suited to autumn (fall) / winter, Harris Tweed can be worn both as a suit and as a sportscoat.

Pinstripe
pinstripe suit

If you’re one of the many men who have never invested in a suit with a pattern then a pinstripe suit should be your starting place. Easiest to wear in a black with grey / white pinstripe, I’d personally recommend looking to a navy or grey cloth with a white pinstripe to differentiate yourself from everyone else. Do not, however, attempt a lighter cloth with a darker pinstripe.

A pinstripe cloth also provides a great visual trick of making the wearer look taller, so is a must for those men after such an affect.

Rope-stripe
ropestripe suit

The rope stripe is the pinstripe’s bolder cousin. Attracting all the sale ‘rules’ of a pinstripe, the rope stripe differentiates itself with a strip that is not ‘pin’ thin – usually the stripe is a few millimetres thick and is finished with a rope like, repetitive pattern.

If the rope stripe does appeal to you, you might also consider a chalk stripe (not featured here as it’s neither in or out of fashion).


Buying the Perfect Suit!

So far we’ve looked at a lot of the on-trend details of suits for 2011, 2012 and beyond, and hopefully by now you have a clearer idea of the style that you’re after – or at least the styles, shapes / cuts, colours and fabrics you should be picking from. There are of course many other elements to consider when investing in a good suit. Not all are trend related, so below you’ll find major elements you’ll want to consider in order to have a wardrobe of suits and sportscoats that mixes fashion with quality.

How many buttons?

A lot of people defer to personal preference when it comes to the amount of buttons a suit or sportscoat should have, but let me say this: when it comes to a single breasted suit, which this section truly applies to, unless you have good reason stick to one or two buttoned suits for 2011 / 2012. In greater detail:

One Button
A single button suit currently falls into the realm of both a classic and a fashion suit; the single button has been a trend before now and will eventually go out again (it was notably out of fashion in the 1980s, but then most everything good was out of fashion back then anyway).

Society’s fashion tastes aside what you want to really consider when purchasing a single buttoned suit is this: how tall you are. They might be very fashionable, but a single button has a shortening affect on a gent; generally speaking, the closer to the neck the button is, the taller a gent will look. A single buttoned on a suit is often closer to the waist, making your torso seem smaller. That’s not an issue if you’re 5’10” or taller, but can be if you’re not.

Take-away: A single buttoned suit or sportscoat can reduce stature and height on a short or stocky figure, so pay careful attention to this detail when trying on such a piece. Best for those over 5’10” or those whose main aim is to own a suit that is considered fashion forwards as opposed to being a fashionably classic.

Two Buttons
My preference for a modern suit. It conveys height, slims the waist, and fits perfectly within the realm of fashion and classicism.

Three Buttons
Very much a look of the 1990’s, thought it has been making a come back as a very fashion forwards option where the buttons are sewn on an angle.

The more traditional, buttoned straight-up-and-down three-buttoned suit is still out there, however, and has been seen amongst the tailored wares of Tom Ford and Ralph Lauren’s Purple Label – though I suspect the former includes it more for his clients who are stuck on the style then because he sees it as forwards or sexual. Three buttons convey a greater sense of height than a two button suit, but are harder to pull off. I own several, and tend to dress them down opting to wear them over a quality cotton t-shirt from Ralph Lauren Purple Label then with a crisp shirt.

Tip: if you do opt for a three button suit, ensure that you only do up the middle button when wearing it.

jefferson hack by StreetFsn
A modern three buttoned suit as worn by Jefferson Hack. Note that the buttons are stitched to an angle and that the lapels are notched / stepped.

Four Buttons or more
Please don’t. I’m yet to see any four button suits which truly impress me or fit in with the current men’s suit aesthetics. Generally speaking, four buttoned suits are the thing of discount wedding stores.

The shoulder of a suit

A lot of suit terms can be mixed and matched, but I’m a fan of something I’ve always called the ‘British rolled-shoulder.’ Others might call it something else, but it is effectively where the shoulder padding finishes. A lot of Italian and US based designers prefer to have the shoulder padding finish precisely where the bone does. A British rolled shoulder has the padding extend over the shoulder and roll down into the sleeve. It’s a technical difference, but it’s also a visual trick that makes the shoulders seem broader and the arms better built.

Such a padded shoulder is perfect for the masculine figure a modern suit is meant to convey, hence it isn’t an element of the preceding sack suit. If you’d like to try on such a fit, Ralph Lauren’s Black Label features such a shoulder in their Anthony cut of suits.

ralph lauren black label suit
A suit from Ralph Lauren Black Label in an ‘Anthony’ cut. Note how the suit’s shoulder extends beyond where the model’s shoulder actually would be, and rolls down, implying broader shoulders and a more masculine physique.

Suit vents

Suit vents are the splits on the tail / rear of the skirt of a men’s suit. This one is really simple: preference a suit which offers two vents (with either, effectively, placed over the buttocks). Let me explain:

A suit without vents will not sit right for day-to-day suit wearing, and is only recommend for a dinner suit.

A single vent is a cut predominant to American, and often Italian tailoring. Sitting down the centre of the rear of a suit it still allows movement but not as effectively as a dual vented suit. Duel vents also allow one to easily put their hands under the suit and into their trouser pockets without damaging the overall silhouette.

Lapels

There are three types of suit lapels generally available to the modern male:

Step lapel
A notched lapel, or the step lapel / collar as it’s known in British parts of the world, is the most prevalent style of men’s lapels. In essence the lapel has a ‘notch’ taken out of either side. The angle of that notch steps down. Hence you now know both the style and how it has come to have different names associated with it.

Takeaway: suited to single breasted suits with any combination of buttons. If you encounter a double breasted suit that offers a notched / step lapel: run.

notch lapel suit
A two button Zegna suit with a notched lapel.

Pointed lapel
This is the on-trend lapel style for 2011 / 2012, with the actual cut again given away by the name: pointed lapel / peak lapel (the difference again comes down to which side of the Atlantic you lean towards). Cutting across the chest, the pointed lapel enhances the much coveted V shape of the male physique, enhancing that elusive masculine quality I’ve referred to throughout this guide.

The only question remains as to what size the peak should be, which is really a question of confidence: how large to you dare wear them? Personally I opt for a natural balance, where the peak sits half way between the top of my arm and the lapel’s natural line. Anything more I find excessive, too 1970s-comeback, and anything less feels pointless.

Takeaway: the most fashionable style of lapel for 2011 / 2012. Perfect with both single breasted and double breasted suits.

gucci pointed lapel
A peak / pointed lapel from Gucci.

white suit jacket

Shawl lapel

A style of lapel that features neither a notch nor a peak, but instead is one continuous, fluid lapel. Generally speaking a shawl lapel should solely be worn with a dinner suit, though as a flourish on a sportscoat / sport jacket worn as evening wear it can be very effective.

A white dinner jacket from Ralph Lauren with a shawl lapel. Note that this rounded finish where the shawl meets the top button is not the on-trend cut, but nor is it out of fashion.

shawl lapelA Tom Ford suit with a shawl lapel. Note how the shawl finishes with a defined cut, as opposed to the roll of the Ralph Lauren jacket on the left.

Other Trends

Naturally, there a number of other fashion trends in 2011. A word of caution however: amongst all of the year’s trends you’ll notice dominant, recurring themes such as the influence of 1970s fashion. Overlook these. Yes, they play some small part in influencing the size of a peaked lapel but they do not, however, have a overarching influence upon men’s suits. At no stage should the trends collide to bring back into fashion bell bottom suits. Suits for 2011 remain about sleek, masculine classics, the more casual trends which we’re also writing about are not.

Source: Fashionising.com by Daniel P Dykes

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Nike Eco Fashion Trend; release January 2011

For Nike Sportswear’s latest project, they hit a double whammy in the hype department with their Nike Premium Print Pack. With references to eco-trends and the rapidly dissolving print world, this series is sure to launch with a bang in the beginning of January 2011.

Source:  Trendland.net By Mini Boss 27

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2011 Colour Trends

We’re yet to fully appreciate 2011’s fashion trends and we haven’t even passed through the coldest days that winter will have to offer but, despite this, in a few months the Autumn / Fall 2011 catwalk showings will hit the likes of New York and Paris ahead of their release into stores in late 2011. Thus many of the world’s trend forecasters have long had available their takes on the trends we’ll be wearing when the season hits. Most of these are in the form of industry only guides, though today we can take a look into the crystal ball and get a sneak peak at the season’s colour trends

fall 2011

These particular colour trends come from Design Options, a trend forecasting company from Southern California. As such they’re heavily influenced by the area, and it won’t be until closer to the season that Fashionising.com can provide you with a look at some of the year’s global colour trends.

As Design Options see it, autumn (fall) / winter 2011 will have six distinctive colour trends:

Nu Vogue

Avant-garde and prevailing chic. Bronze tones of state of the art style flirt endlessly with bold confidence. Olive yarns mixed with shades of pale goldenrod give knits an alluring appeal.

Urban Romance

A tale of metropolitan melodrama. Midnight blue and silver, grey shades of cultural diversity and cosmopolitan give textured stitching equilibrium and charm. Memoirs of city nostalgia.

autumn 2011

Edge of Night

Beyond the limits of darkness. Mysterious shades of forest green and plum amplify sequined edges and ruffled chiffon. Deep violet shades of exuberance ring a call of precision to manipulated, silken yarn. Silver finishes give luxuriant motifs added ingenuity.

winter 2011

Fill Seeker

The pursuit of extravagant ornamentation. Luscious shades of hot pink intertwine majestically within bastiste and silken silhouettes. Burnt orange tones of superfluity fuse methodically on a canvas of raschel knit.

autumn 2011

Moonstruck

Spellbound and romantically sensual. Greenish yellow tones of nostalgia fuse rhythmically with bold saturations of aquamarine and dark sienna. Copper flecks of bedazzled resonate with splendid vivacity amidst soft patterns of royal blue velvet.

fall 2011

Source: Fashionising.com Written by Daniel P Dykes

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Key Looks of Woman’s Spring 2011 Fashion Trends

'70s glamour

70’s Glamour

Just as the ’50s and ’60s are back, so too are particular elements of the ’70s. There are two main aesthetics: ’70s bohemian, and ’70s sophisticated glamour. When it comes to the latter, think dresses that fall like shimmering water in the evening and high-waist pants with elegant blouses by day.

We all want that vintage vibe in our wardrobe. That essence of an era gone by. And we want to cherry pick the sleekest, sexiest, and most stylish looks from it. In recent years we’ve worn the best of the 20s and 30s, seen the rebirth and fading of an 80s come back, and we’re just about to do it all again. But this time, its the 1970s that are due for a reinterpretation.

While ’70s fashion is making waves and sure to continue on as a fashion trend in 2011, let’s not forget that there are several variants. And you know what that means; all the more ways to get lots of wear out of your key seventies pieces, by taking them from ’70s boho to a more sophisticated ’70s look.

70s sophisticated dressing
’70s styling at Elie Tahari A/W 2010

’70s sophisticate: the look

There’s an underlying confidence to this trend that’s key. Even the more demure looks need to be carried off with an air of sexuality and a sort of defiant independence. There’s a boldness. It’s in the addition of that floppy felt hat, those exotic jewels, that super-high pair of platforms. At night time the hint can snowball into a statement: think Bianca Jagger at Studio 54 in a slinky gown, ivory cigarette holder in hand, and you’ve got the picture. Read on for tips for both day and night time looks.

Bianca Jagger
70s style icon Bianca Jagger

’70s sophistication by dayBy day it’s all about clean yet voluminous silhouettes, and earthy ’70s colour palettes. Look for:

  • High waisted wide-leg pants or flares, smartly belted in.
  • Neat bow-blouses, especially ones with billowing or bishop sleeves. Particularly great are fabrics like silk and satin.
  • Roll neck sweaters tucked into pants or skirts. Add to the ’70s effect by layering over beaded necklaces or a vest.
  • For those more daring, a pair of hot pants are the ultimate ’70s item.
  • A smart printed jumpsuit is another great alternative.

70s daytime glamour
Daytime ’70s styling at Chloe A/W 2010

’70s sophistication by night

By night the ’70s sophisticate turns into the ultimate socialite, with look-at-me shimmering fabrics and cuts that either tightly hug or sensually drape over the body.

  • Choose high sheen fabrics with a ’70s disco-inspired edge, like lurex or silk; anything with a metallic thread.
  • Add a ruffled neckline under a brocade blazer or tuxedo jacket, paired with a sharp pair of pants.
  • Long, slinky gowns with draping, low necklines or dress slits are the ultimate in ’70s night time glamour.

70s nighttime glamour
’70s evening glamour at Ferragamo A/W 2010

Accessorising a sophisticated ’70s look

Accessories are key when it comes to creating a ’70s look. Some things to keep in mind:

  • The right handbag completes a look. Try for smart, high quality bags like a leather satchel for day, and a small bag with a long strap for night.
  • Big, statement leather belts slung over mini skirts or maxi dresses add impact and fair to a seventies-inspired outfit.
  • A pair of on-trend thigh high boots are probably already be in your wardrobe by now – pair them with hot pants or a skirt for a decidedly sexed-up yet sophisticated ’70s look.
  • Wear lots of jewellery – but keep it a little cleaner than for a boho look. Try lots of rings with bold stones, neat piles of bangles, and long pendant necklaces and strings of beads.
  • Look to complimentary hairstyles like a sleek longer bob, masses of bouncy curls, or long, flowing hair.

Freja Beha Erichsen 70s shoot
Freja Beha Erichsen in Vogue Nippon, August 2010

bike fashion

Biker Clothing

As of spring 2011 the military fashion trend will have been with us for over a decade. And for that decade it’s been great, we’ve loved it, but 10 years later we have to admit: spring 2011 is the time to move on. The question is: what do we move on to? The answer: the trend that’s been living in its shadow, waiting for its moment of glory. And for spring / summer 2011 it’s going to get just that because here comes the biker trend.
Biker Fashion: Motorcycle Chic Trend

Written by Daniel P Dykes

Trends begin, they evolve, and then they fade or simply become a standard. Skinny jeans became a standard, the military fashion trend cannot. So as 2011’s fashion trends come to fruition, as we move fully into a new decade, and as military chic becomes as drawn out as the war that inspired it, what becomes of the military influences that have helped keep the likes of Balmain and Burberry in fashionisers’ conscience? What replaces it?

The answer may lie in a trend that has been around for some time, but a trend that hasn’t been able to be much more than a blip on the radar while in the shadow of military fashion. The trend?Biker chic.

biker fashion

If you like this trend let us know by clicking the ‘Like’ button below. And don’t forget that if you’d like to keep up to date with all the latest trends, and how to wear them, you can subscribe toFashionising.com’s newsletter or RSS feed.

And we’re not the only ones to think so. Take Burberry who, with little ceremony, dwindled the military motifs that they’ve been known for of late down to a few select elements in their S/S 2011 collection. Much of the rest of the collection was biker inspired and infused, so much so that the collection is named Heritage Biker. So with biker fashion elements not exactly being something new for 2011, it leaves to be discovered what elements will help take the style to a new level.

Biker Fashion: Key Elements

Motorcycle jacket

Can you imagine the military trend without a military jacket? Not possible. And so it goes without saying that the motorcycle jacket is the key statement piece for the motorcyclebiker fashiontrend. Naturally, not any motorcycle jacket will do. While we undoubtedly will see fast fashion stores give us motorcycle jackets in the now-subdued vein of the ‘Brando jacket’, the motorcycle jacket in 2011 needs to be much more of a statement piece.

And so it goes that it’s not merely about an overused cut and simple black colour. In fact, many a colour will suit. You can take the lead from Burberry’s colour offerings (above in a traditional Burberry colour, immediately below in silver, and further below in two-tone leather), or you can look to spring 2010’s colour trends, specifically those for leather, for inspiration.

silver motorcycle jacket
Silver motorcycle jacket from Burberry

leather motorcycle jacket
Two-toned leather motorcycle jacket from Burberry

Of course, just because the biker chic trend is about more than Brando jackets and black motorcycle jackets doesn’t mean to say that the trend is completely devoid of both styles. Take Balmain’s, pre-spring 2011 offering for instance: it’s a motorcycle jacket that is somewhat military-cum-Brando.

balmain motorcycle jacket
Balmain motorcycle jacket

So with everything from boring blacks to statement silvers having been designed, what key elements should a fashioniser be looking for in a statement military jacket for 2011?The answer is two in particular.

Zipped sleeves

motorcycle jacket sleeves
Zipped motorcycle jacket sleeves from Burberry

Quilting

quilted motorcycle jacket
Quilted motorcycle jacket from Burberry

burberry motorcycle jacket
Trench coat with subtle quilting and motorcycle jacket zips from Burberry

Leather pants

You may think of biker pants as anything skin tight and black. But again, that’s not necessarily so in 2011. Christopher Bailey’s leather motorcycle pants for Burberry can grab attention just as well in neutral tones, with mesh side-panels and an exposed, feature zip. As with other elements of the bike chic trend it’s all about the detail, and last season’s plain leather leggings won’t quite cut it. Panels, quilting and padding, and zips all add to the tough yet ultra-slick and modern feel of the neo biker pant, while other thick, skin-hugging materials like neoprene can also work as an alternative to leather.

burberry leather pnts
Leather motorcycle pants from Burberry

The skirted alternative

As it is with other elements of the biker chic trend, there’s also an alternative to biker pants. Drawing on the quilted motifs of their motorcycle jackets, Burberry have produced a neo-mod leather skirt with quilting detailing that not only sits perfectly with the bike fashion trend, but also acts as the perfect alternative statement piece to the motorcycle jacket.

burberry motorcycle jacket
Leather skirt with bike chic detailing from Burberry

Motorcycle boots

And last but not least, motorcycle boots round out the key elements of the biker fashion trend – hardly a surprise given no trend is complete without a tie-in shoe trend. Biker boots, having been in fashion for some time now, won’t be hard to come by. You could consider that a plus, but don’t rest on your laurels: mass marketing of biker boots means that a lot of very average styles are going to be seen on the streets already, so in order to get motorcycle boots right in 2011 look for a statement pair; something that exudes quality and style – a pair such as the Chanel biker boots.

biker boots
Chanel biker boots

spring 2011 jacket

Punk Fashion

Another of the thematic trends for spring / summer 2011, punk carries on from last year to become less of a full blown trend and more one of influence – you’ll see its elements impact upon a number of other spring 2011 trends. Which can be a danger: punk fashion is one trend you can’t afford to get wrong. Read our guide to punk fashion for spring / summer 2011 to find out what it entails, what elements you should wear, and the looks you should avoid.
Punk Fashion: Elements of Influence

Written by Daniel P Dykes

We like to write about certain kinds of fashion trends at Fashionising.com. Trends that marry all the qualities of an appealing lifestyle, that marry together quality craftsmanship, elegance and an an attitude towards a life that indulges the senses and you know roughly where our tastes lie. Hence there is many a trend we opt to simply not push – stand for everything and you stand for nothing. Despite this there are some fashion trends in 2011 which, despite being unlikely to indulge in ourselves, we simply can’t ignore. And that’s because they have an impact on other trends that are important to us.

One such trend is punk – a trend that last emerged in 2010 and one that will continue to influence the fashion aesthetic of 2011 and potentially beyond. Partially filling the vacuum left behind by done and dusted trends, such as the likes of military, gothic and grunge, it’s punk’s ability to impact on other trends, such as 2011’s motorcycle chic trend (the stronger and more versatile of the two trends), that makes it worth watching and noting.

balmain punk
Balmain SS11

Read on to find out more about the trend, what it entails, and what elements you can wear.

If you like this trend let us know by clicking the ‘Like’ button below. And don’t forget that if you’d like to keep up to date with all the latest trends, and how to wear them, you can subscribe toFashionising.com’s newsletter or RSS feed.

Punk Fashion: The Full Blown Trend

Punk over the years has incorporated many subcultures and substyles. Regardless of these, the core is always a sense of rebellion and controversy; something meant to shock. In today’s fast world, sock is something that is much harder to do.

Which is one of the things that weakens punk fashion as a full blown fashion trend. Wear punk in the same way that Sid Vicious did and you risk looking like you’re playing dress ups as opposed to being something of a rebel.

That’s the first problem with punk fashion as a full blown fashion trend. The second is that many of the common elements of punk have already had plenty of exposure over recent seasons as a part of other trends: leather, military / combat, bondage / fetish, ripped stockings, and tattoos (which are now completely commonplace) are some examples. There’s so much cross over that, while punk certainly warrants a mention for spring / summer 2011, it by no means stands in isolation.

Hence for 2011, no matter what you read, the punk fashion trend should be less about an overall theme and more about mixing punk elements with other seasonal trends. For example, something ultra-feminine with a punk-rock edge.

balenciaga punk
Modern / neo punk from Balenciaga SS11

Punk Details: What to Wear

If dressing akin to the Sex Pistols doesn’t quite appeal then there are still punk details that you can indulge in.

Studs

Wear as a dominant, though not over the top detail.

There is, of course, a danger with studs that involves more than accidentally inflicting their piercing potential upon others – it’s very easy for them to be worn in an over-the-top way. There is a fine line between fashion forward details and chav-like overindulgence.

balmain punk
Studded leather jacket at Balmain SS11

Heavy boots

Combat boots (dovetailing with the military fashion trend), Doc Martens, or biker boots can punk up an outfit – particularly when paired with skinny jeans or skinny leather pants.

balenciaga punk
Balenciaga SS11

Safely pins

More than just a handy gem for getting you out of a fashion disaster, the safety pin is iconic to punk. That doesn’t mean you need to wear one as a nose piercing; but do look at safety pins and indeed kilt pins as an accessory that can work in dozens of different ways. Think brooches and other bits of makeshift jewellery, or to haphazardly pin scarves, cardigans or other bits of clothing.

balmain punk
Safety pins at Balmain SS11

60s ladylike

60s Ladylike

The silhouettes of the 1950s and 1960s make a strong return, with shapes that accentuate curves and foster femininity. A hip-hugging sheath dress with a below-the-knee hem is the ultimate in hourglass dressing, while the full circle skirt and dress remain at the core of the trend. For Spring 2011 introduce fresh colours, prints and light summery fabrics. Click to read about the ’60s dress trend.
60s Dress / Full Skirt
Written by Tania BraukamperIt’s no great accident that the popularity of Mad Men has coincided with a resurgence in early ’60s fashion. A sartorial inspiration to men and women alike, we’ve seen an avalanche of elements from the era spill over into fashion’s impressionable mind; and the bulk of the torrent is yet to come. 

So say bonjour to fuller figures and longer hemlines as the skirt and dress silhouettes of the late ’50s / early ’60s swing their way back onto the scene as a 20102011 fashion trend.

60s full skirt
Full ’60s dress at Louis Vuitton A/W 2010

’60s dress trend: what is it?

When we talk about the ’60s dress or skirt in this context, we’re not talking about the later, mod ’60s movement of miniskirts and teeny shift dresses. We’re talking about early ’60s ladylike dressing that flowed on from the late 1950s.

Dress Styles

Full skirts: the ’60s housewife

Think Betty Draper: the overflow of ’50s prom style dresses into ’60s day wear. Full, below-the-knee circle skirts, cinched in waists, and prim, proper styling.

  • Look to Louis Vuitton and Prada who both put ladylike full skirts on their runways for theFall 2010 season, particularly in heavier fabrics like wool blends.
  • For Spring 2011 look to bright, fresh colours and pastels, and prints like florals or stripes (seeJayson Brunsdon Spring 2010 for some great examples).

full skirt
Full dress at Jayson Brunsdon, S/S 2010

The granny skirt

Don’t panic about the name of this one; this look actually was commonly known as the granny skirt back in the ’60s.

Longer, usually gathered or pleated, often with a ruffled hem, the granny skirt is as it sounds: a young take on grandma dressing. It falls rather than puffs out too much and is more understated – think sixties office girl. If I’m to stick with the Mad Men analogy, this is the style you’d more likely spot on Peggy Olsen. The key to pulling off this look today is to either make it completely effortless, or surprisingly sexy.

  • Avoid looking dowdy by pairing with a fitted top; or sex it up with a sheer blouse.
  • For an authentic look pair with flats or dainty kitten heels. To modernise, stick with a pair of high heels.
  • Sweeten it up with a pair of little bobby socks under shoes a la Marc Jacobs (see theinspiration gallery).

full plaid skirt
Full skirt at Louis Vuitton, A/W 2010

The bombshell: sheath skirts and dresses

There’s no doubt that, as the trend stands to date, the full skirt is the silhouette du jour. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t other options for a sensual, early ’60s look. A straight cut sheath orpencil skirt is the ultimate in creating a 1960s hourglass shape – not only cinching in the waist, but clinging to the hips as well. Think Man Men bombshell Joan Holloway (yes I know – anotherMad Men allusion. The characters just fit so perfectly.)

  • Look for skirts that are straight, high waisted, below knee with a kick pleat or slit at the back.
  • You can also look for fitted sheath dresses. These are great sleeveless or with classic three-quarter sleeves.
  • The peg-top skirt is another alternative – full at the waist with small darts or pleats, and tapering narrowly to the hem.

60s sheath dress
Sheath dress at L’Wren Scott, S/S 2010

Accessorising a ’60s ladylike look

If you want to stick with the theme, here are a few traditional ways of accessorising a ’60s look that can still work today:

  • Ladylike kitten heels.
  • Bold red lipstick for a bombshell look or soft pink for a vintage belle.
  • Cats-eye glasses.
  • ’60s accessories: a wide, waist-cinching belt; a leather clutch in candy-store pastels; gloves; a classic headscarf.
  • Hair worn sultry and ’60s sex kitten, or swept up into a beehive.

See the inspiration gallery for more styling ideas.

Prada ladylike 60s dress
Ladylike full dress at Prada, A/W 2010

Modernising the ’60s look

As well as the points already mentioned, there are plenty of other ways to bring the late ’50s / early ’60s silhouettes into the now. Here are just a few.

  • Follow Dries Van Noten’s lead for the ultimate in effortless modernising of the ’60s full skirt. Throw over a boyfriend blazer with a turned up collar, or a souchy sporty sweat top, and slip on a pair of on-trend sunglasses.
  • Try the same silhouettes but with a shorter hemline, such as above the knee or shorter.
  • Add a pair of knee high socks that can just be seen below the hemline.
  • Look for pieces in fabrics like leather or sheer tulle for an edgy update on the look.
  • Pair a full ’60s skirt or sheath skirt with a cropped top, exposing a little midriff.
  • Wear with one of the more modern 2010 hair trends like a messy topknot or effortless side braid.

Dries Van Noten casual 60s

Modern take on the full skirt at Dries van Noten, A/W 2010

 

Source: Fashionising.com

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