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Digital Fashion Week – World’s First Live Streaming Only Fashion Week to be Hosted In Singapore October 2012

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

Live streaming of fashion shows has become de rigueur but we’re taking it up a notch with Digital Fashion Week (DFW). As the world’s first live streaming only fashion week, DFW will unify fashion and technology innovation in this groundbreaking advancement.

 

Digital Fashion Week 2012

 

Gone is the era of front row guests at the traditional fashion weeks. This time, we’re going digital. For the first time in fashion history, a fashion week will be live streamed solely online, and consumers can shop their favorite looks off the runway in real time and have them delivered in a matter of weeks – way before they hit the stores.

A high-profile showcase of celebrated designers from every major city, DFW gives designers the ability to reach out to consumers worldwide and global audiences absolute access into the world of fashion.

Labeled by CNN Go as ‘The Next Big Names in Singapore Fashion’, DFW is organized by the creative minds of STORM Creative Events Agency. As the pioneer of fashion show live streaming in Singapore in May 2011, it garnered a record high of 500,000 viewers from 90 countries within a week.

This October will see DFW’s debut edition, Digital Fashion Week Singapore exclusively available for viewing at http://www.digitalfashionweek.com. The twice-yearly event boasts an exciting designer lineup of Singapore’s biggest names presenting their Spring/Summer 2013 collections, with a special appearance by an international guest designer marking the inaugural event in a debut runway show.

Digital Fashion Week

Quote startMr. Keyis Ng, co-founder of Digital Fashion Week states, “Until now, no digital platform as powerful as DFW has
existed for designers to reach out to people worldwide.”Quote end

Besides live coverage of DFW front row and backstage buzz, interviews with designers and artistes and fringe events, DFW incorporates new features such as live runway commentaries by key fashion figures, pre-show performances by internationally renowned artistes and a one-stop mobile application to provide users with instant fashion show live streaming, videos, runway photos, designers information and e-commerce shopping – giving the global audiences a dynamic fashion week experience like never before.

Digital Fashion Week consists of three main elements:

Front Row Access:
Live backstage action of hair and makeup.
Live interviews with models, designers, hair and makeup artists.
Live pre-show performances by renowned artistes.
Live runway shows with special appearances by top models . Live runway commentary by key fashion figures.
Live post-show party coverage.

Real-Time Shopping:
Consumers can buy their favorite designs off the runway instantly and have them delivered within a matter of weeks.

Power to Influence:
Consumers will have the unique opportunity to provide the designers with instant feedback. The pre-orders made for every collection will provide designers with insights into market trends.

Mr. Keyis Ng, co-founder of DFW states, “Until now, no digital platform as powerful as DFW has
existed for designers to reach out to people worldwide. We aim to harness technology and
creativity to promote home-grown designers in each city to the global audiences by capitalizing on the hype generated from the fashion shows. The buzz created will then be directly converted into sales and sync the fashion communication cycle with its retail cycle.”

In conjunction with Digital Fashion Week Singapore, a virtual B2B platform, DFW Digital Showroom will also be launched. Press, buyers and retailers from all over the world can enjoy
exclusive access to intimate collection presentations by the DFW designers through lookbook
images and pre-recorded videos made available immediately after every fashion show. DFW will be the ultimate digital fashion gateway in connecting designers to the world.

“Singapore has grown to be Asia’s most network-ready country with one of the highest mobile
penetrations in the world. The age of Digital Fashion is here; it is the perfect timing for the fashion
industry to embrace the future of technology, first-hand in Singapore.” co-founder of DFW, Ms.Charina Widjaja said.

Besides its official launch as a twice-yearly event in Singapore, DFW will also proceed to other major cities around the world.

Show schedule, designer and performance lineup, additional updates will be announced in August 2012.

Frontrow DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

Frontrow DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

About Digital Fashion Week Private Limited
Digital Fashion Week Pte Ltd was founded in 2012 by the creative minds behind STORM Creative Events Agency. STORM is widely recognized for pushing boundaries by combining technology with lifestyle and was named by ELLE Singapore as ‘The Name to Watch’ within the first year of its launch. STORM has also been featured several times in leading publications namely Marketing Magazine UK, CIO Asia, Springwise.com, TrendHunter.com, The Straits Times, The New Paper, Lian He Zao Bao and many more. The team at STORM has worked with many established fashion houses ranging from high-end designer labels to mass market brands.

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

DFW Digital Fashion Week Singapore 2012

Original Source: PRWeb.com

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Creating a Green Fashion Label

When consumers shop for groceries, they tend to review the nutrition label and ingredients list on the food package to obtain dietary information. This food label system helps people make an informed decision and lead healthier lifestyles. Shouldn’t consumers have resources for making similar choices when shopping for apparel products? According to the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (TFPIA), all apparel products should have a label that includes: fiber content, country of origin, manufacturer identification, and care instructions.

 

However, the clothing label may not be informative enough to educate consumers regarding what processes were used to make the product and what environmental impacts those processes may have. One of the common myths consumers may believe regarding apparel products is that natural fiber products are more environmentally friendly than synthetic fiber products. Considering the fact that the textile and apparel industry is a major contributor to environmental degradation, it is important to provide more informative, easy-to-read labels for apparel products, responding to consumers’ growing concerns about environmental issues related to their consumable products.

From interviews with five apparel design personnel in two companies (although these opinions cannot represent all designers’ and merchandisers’ opinions), our research team found that they were aware of the environmental problems associated with dyeing and textile processing. However, interestingly, they did not regard themselves as responsible for correcting these problems.

They also indicated that the biggest determining factor for apparel designers and merchandisers when deciding where to obtain materials for production is the availability of materials from suppliers who have had a long–term relationship with the company. It seems that environmentally friendly materials were not their main concern. They added that if they were sure that their target consumers would be willing to purchase environmentally friendly products, they would practice sustainability. Without certainty, they did not want to take the risk because using green materials costs more. The industry personnel felt that there was nothing they could do as designers or merchandisers to address environmental issues, believing that environmentally friendly production was beyond their ability.

Do consumers agree with these opinions? To explore consumer opinions about green apparel products and purchasing behaviors, a serious of focus group discussions were conducted with 32 consumers. Although organic fibers and other green apparel options are already available in the market, participants demonstrated a lack of knowledge about these products. Interestingly, several respondents knew of organic clothing only in terms of simple items, such as T–shirts, while others did not even know that organic or green apparel was an available option.

In addition, the respondents agreed that if there were more information about green apparel products available, they would be more prone to buy them. They felt skeptical about current eco–claims because labeling of green apparel is voluntary and no general rules have been implemented for apparel product labeling. They added that current labels on green clothing did not offer an adequate amount of information to consumers. They were unsure of exactly what “environmentally friendly” meant and how the products they had seen were environmentally friendly. Additionally, most of the participants agreed that a well–established eco–label for apparel products would increase consumers’ knowledge of environmental impacts from apparel production and foster consumers’ green apparel purchasing behaviors.

Regarding willingness to buy green apparel products, they mentioned that they would be more likely to purchase green apparel products if they were cheaper and more readily available. Respondents indicated that they would not buy a less attractive environmentally friendly garment with the label attached to it over a more attractive conventional product. Therefore, before emphasizing green aspects, products should meet the quality expectations of consumers.

Based on these two investigations, the research team suggested that a labeling system could be used to reduce the information gap between producers and consumers. Green labels for textile and apparel products can facilitate choices for consumers making environmentally responsible purchasing decisions by motivating and/or educating them (D’Souza, et al., 2006).

As mentioned earlier, just as the nutritional facts and ingredients are listed on food packages, the apparel label can include customized information on how the content of a specific product and its production processes impact the environment. Our research team identified six sustainability aspects of apparel products as the key information that would be beneficial for consumers to know from the green apparel label: organic, biodegradable, safely dyed, fair trade, carbon footprint, and recycled. Creating eye–catching symbols accompanied by brief explanations for clarification, which convey the key aspects of sustainability within the apparel industry, will be necessary. This design will make the labels easy to read and serve as a convenient reference for consumers.

If the standardized and easy–to–read label is commonly used in the textile and apparel industry in the future, it will educate consumers about green products and their effects on our surrounding environment. By becoming more knowledgeable about green products, consumers will be able to make more informed purchases of environmentally responsible products. In addition, educated consumers will drive businesses to practice more sustainability. Adopting the easy–to–read, informative green label will help retailers promote their eco–friendly strategies. As people continue to show interest in green products through purchases, the availability of various green products will increase, resulting in growing diversity in the retailing industry.

This educational research brief is from the University of Delaware (Fiber Online Journal).
Creating a Green Label for Reducing the Gap

Authors:
Dr. Hae Jin Gam is an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at Illinois State University. She was a fashion designer in South Korea until 2001. Her doctoral research was in the area of sustainable apparel design and production development and was funded by the Environmental Protection Agency. Her current research interests include sustainability in the apparel and textile industry, apparel product development, consumers’ eco–friendly purchasing behavior, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Dr. Yoon Jin Ma is an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at Illinois State University. Her research interests include social responsibility in apparel consumption, manufacturing, and retailing; consumer behavior; services marketing; and scale development. She received the Student Best Paper Award at the doctoral level from the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) in 2008, the Best Track Paper Award in the textile and apparel/international track from ITAA in 2009, and the Paper of Distinction Award in the consumer behavior track from ITAA in 2010

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10 Reasons Your Business Should Have a Custom Facebook Landing Page

If your business is on Facebook, adding a custom landing page can have a big impact on your presence there. A custom landing page can help drive web traffic, add value to your online marketing efforts and increase sales.

If you’re considering the types of benefits a custom landing page can create, this post will help make up your mind.

A custom Facebook landing page can:

1. HIGHLIGHT A CALL TO ACTION.

One of the biggest points about your landing page should be to direct your audience to do something, whether its signing up for your newsletter, downloading a coupon or requesting a free sample. You can use a custom landing page as a way to extend the reach of your lead generating efforts.

2. DRIVE INTEREST IN CURRENT PROMOTIONS, EVENTS AND PRODUCTS.

A landing page can be a great flexible feature area for your web presence. You can generate a buzz around new products there or break news about sales and promotions. Heck, you might even want to test out breaking new information there first to see if it helps grow your network.

3. DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT.

There are several touted best practices for a Facebook landing page, and several companies that are heralded as having some of the best ones out there. Unfortunately, this spurns a lot of copycats. Try to take cues from what you see as a best practice and add your own dose of originality.

4. PERSONALIZE YOUR COMPANY IN AN IMPERSONAL WORLD.

Facebook profiles without customization can be bland and formulaic. A well-designed landing page will help your page stand out in a land of static templates. A thought out landing page can also help you personally connect to your audience and further brand your platform. Be careful not to simply recreate your web design. Remember, your customers are there to get something unique.

5. WELCOME VISITORS TO YOUR PAGE.

On Facebook, new fan pages and groups pop up every day. There can be confusion as to whether or not you are on the “official” page of the brand, celebrity or organization you are searching for. A landing page will lend credibility to your platform and reassure your audience they are in the right place. And it’s a pretty cool welcome mat, too.

6. DETERMINE ROI WITH IFRAMED LANDING PAGE TABS.

We’ve got news for your accounting department — you can now determine whether or not your Facebook page is directly leading to sales. Several socially savvy companies have caught on to this. JCPenny, Delta and Threadless all have shopping carts iFramed into their Facebook pages. Whether you’re booking public storage spaces or selling software, your Facebook page can act as another direct sales channel.

7. HIGHLIGHT SPECIAL OFFERS FOR “LIKING” YOUR PAGE.

Once you actually get someone to your Facebook page, there’s no guarantee you’re going to get them to actually click that “Like” button. Use a landing page to give them that incentive. Think about special discounts, coupons or other rewards you can give to your network to thank them for their loyalty.

8. DRAW ATTENTION TO YOUR “LIKE” BUTTON.

Let me peface this by saying that I’ve never had a problem locating a “Like” button on a business page. However, there are still valid reasons to embed them in a landing page. Mobile devices, like smart phones and tablets, are quickly evolving into the primary tools people use to access the Internet. It’s now much more difficult to gauge what will appear above and below the fold. Strategically embedding a “Like” button in another spot may make it more likely a visitor will follow your call to action. But don’t go overboard.

9. SHOWCASE YOUR CREATIVITY OR HUMOR WITH UNIQUE CONTENT.

A landing page is a place where companies can step outside of their stilted corporate persona and connect with an audience from one human to another. Think of something “off the wall” (Oh, no I didn’t. Yes, I did.) to display the personalities within your organization. Humor is a no brainer. Taco Bell (another company that is mentioned frequently in social media marketing) currently uses its landing page as a Superhero video comic strip. This is the kind of unique value customers are seeking when they become a part of your network.

10. CALL ATTENTION TO YOUR VALUE PROPOSITIONS.

By now, your brand has established its value propositions. Without duplicating your website content, use the landing page as a flexible channel to bring attention to the benefits your company offers. One thing to note when you do this however is to not be overly promotional. Eyes will glaze. Back buttons will be clicked.

Source: Sexysocialmedia.com

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Oscar de la Renta’s CEO: “why e-commerce works & how social media serves the fashion brand’s designers & merchandisers”

When the Improbable Is Also Profitable

2680_alexbolen_mediumBecause today’s luxury goods consumers are present across numerous channels, being there for them wherever they may be is a crucial aspect of business to get right, says Alex Bolen, Oscar de la Renta’s chief executive – and the man responsible for the fashion brand’s foray into e-commerce and social media.

“Our presence online has suggested to me that consumers are very quickly adjusting their behaviour to new modes of shopping and we need to really be out at the forefront of it. We have had many surprise anecdotes from having our brand online, anything from a $50,000 chinchilla coat sale through our website to completing a sale for a bridal dress via Twitter.”

For many luxury fashion brands, e-commerce has still not yet eclipsed the performance of physical stores but a very significant consumer appetite is present.

“ Our customer has taught us that there are moments where she will want to spend hours in a store shopping and there are moments where it’s a quick impulsive purchase ”

“When we first began thinking about e-commerce three to four years ago I was very sceptical that our brand would not fare well as, at that time, we were not particularly optimized in products that don’t have size requirements. Our bread and butter product is a $4 – 5,000 cocktail dress which is very fit intensive, in fact the perfectly fitted garment is an important part of our brand and this is something that seemed to me didn’t jive well with an online shopping experience.”

“I was wrong about that. Surprisingly we have had a very good reaction to our fit intensive products online. What we found in retrospect is that customers will order two different sizes and keep one of them.”

“Our customer has taught us that there are moments where she will want to spend hours in a store shopping and there are moments where it’s a quick impulsive purchase – as a luxury brand it’s important to us that we are present wherever our customer is.”

According to Bolen, e-commerce currently drives only 10% of the luxury fashion brand but it is growing very quickly. In a relatively short period of time, he forecasts Oscardelarenta.com to become the brand’s most prolific door.

One of the ways that the brand is extending its outreach to drive customers back to the site is through social media. Oscar de la Renta has taken a very creative approach to emerging media platforms such as creating a unique online personality for the brand on Twitter called OscarPRgirl. The brand uses Twitter as a channel to provide unique insight into the world of Oscar de la Renta and to engage with entirely new audiences as well supporting the interests of existing ones.

“We want to broaden our array of services to our customers as much as possible and services include consuming content. Everyone who goes to Oscardelarenta.com is a potential shopper – maybe they are a shopper today maybe they are a shopper in six months. As a brand we need to figure out a way to engage them and we need to offer services for wherever that person may stand on the potential customer spectrum.”“As a brand, we want to augment the initiatives online started by OscarPRgirl and speak more about what we are doing by explaining what our brand is about in more than just 140 characters. This means we want to extend our communications to areas such as rich video content and audio content.”

For a luxury brand like Oscar de la Renta, social media is proving to be much more than just a PR tool but one that is feeding business insights about the brand back to the company. “For Oscar de la Renta, social media has provided us with information on what our customers think, what they need, what they want and what they expect of us. From our jewellery offerings, accessories, scarves, etc. we have made many merchandising choices [and] many design choices based on feedback we got online.”“I am a big believer that you have to listen to your customers, and the online world has given us a new way to listen to our customers and we have learned to position ourselves based on what we hear.”

Source: Luxurysociety.com

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16 Key Luxury Fashion Brand Distributors

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A round up of sixteen of the most prominent luxury goods distributors, including Bosco di Ciliegi, Bluebell, Swiss Prestige and Chalhoub Group.

Despite their inherant focus on brand control, luxury manufacturers have commonly relied on local distributors to introduce products to new markets, acknowledging that whilst they might know what is best for their brand communications, design and development, they may not necessarily understand local cultures, retail climates and stores. Whilst houses retain control of distribution in home-markets of Europe and the US, markets such as the United Arab Emirates, Asia and Russia, are often leveraged through a network of premium distributors.

Luxury Society investigated the distribution market and presents a round up of the most influential groups around the world. For a complete listing of distribution groups, we invite you to explore the Luxury Society directory and discover further titles in your region.

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Valiram, Malaysia

The Valiram Group operates high fashion and luxury-goods boutiques in domestic and airport retail environments, housing both branded and multi-branded stores that feature some of the world’s finest luxury brands. Recently the group began fragrance distribution in Malaysia, for Cartier, Lalique and Asprey, with plans to grow the business to their other serviced regions, Singapore, Indonesia and Australia.

Brands: Bally, Bvlgari, Cartier, Chanel, Chloé, Chopard, Coach, Dunhill, Fendi, Giuseppe Zanotti, Godiva, Hermès, Hugo Boss, Jimmy Choo, Montblanc, Omega, Rolex, Salvatore Ferragamo, TAG Heuer, Tod’s, Vertu, Versace

Stores: Eye Spy, Fashion Gallery, Flying Emporium, Luxury Fashion, Podium Motorsport, Swiss Watch Gallery, Vie Beauté, Wear + When

LS Company Profile: Valiram Group
Website: Valiram Group
Contact: Email

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Bluebell, Hong Kong

The Bluebell Group is an importer, agency and distributor of exclusive lifestyle products, managing a portfolio of fashion, accessories, perfumes and cosmetics, leather goods and homewares brands. They work closely with international brand owners to tailor distribution and marketing direction to match each brand’s strategy and have built a presence in China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand.

Brands: Paul Smith, Céline, Givenchy, Fendi, Blumarine, Kenzo, Twenty8Twelve, Moschino, Anya Hindmarch, Barbara Bui, Trussardi, Jimmy Choo, Louis Vuitton, Celine, Marc Jacobs, Loewe, Dior, Fendi, Davidoff

LS Company Profile: Bluebell Group
Website: Bluebell Group
Contact: Email

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Chalhoub Group, Dubai

The Chalhoub Group specialises in the retail and distribution of renowned brands within the sectors of Beauty, Fashion and Gifts. They represent a portfolio of over 280 luxury brands, manage over 350 retail outlets and have a presence in 14 countries, partnering with prestigious houses such as Baccarat, Christofle, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton and Nina Ricci.

Brands: Fendi, Swarovski, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, Céline, Chanel, Prada, Givenchy, Calvin Klein, Barbara Bui, Christian Louboutin, Dsquared, Kenzo, Lanvin, Paule Ka

Stores: Tangara, Faces, Scarpe, Tagz

LS Company Profile: Chalhoub Group
Website: Challhoub
Contact: Email

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FJ Benjamin, Singapore

FJ Benjamin developes retail and distribution networks for international luxury and lifestyle brands across Asia, as well as handling their promotion and brand building within the region. The public company, headquartered in Singapore, was listed on the Singapore Exchange in November 1996. It has offices in 8 cities, represents over 20 brands and operates over 170 retail stores/shop-in-shops, retailing and distributing luxury and lifestyle products and time pieces across Southeast Asia and Australia.

Brands: Céline, Rado, Givenchy, Goyard, DeWitt, Girard-Perregaux, Victorinox Swiss Army

LS Company Profile: FJ Benjamin
Website: FJ Benjamin
Contact: Email

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Genesis Colors, New Dehli

Originally spearheading the corporatisation of the Indian fashion industry, building buisnesses for premium designer labels such as Satya Paul, Deepika Gehani, Samsaara, Shobhaa De and Bwitch, Genesis Colors, forayed into the marketing and distribution of world-renowned luxury brands in India, through its new division, Genesis Luxury Fashion. The group services the Indian market through branded stores.

Brands: Burberry, Paul Smith, Canali, Kenzo, Just Cavalli, Bottega Veneta, Aigner, Jimmy Choo.

LS Company Profile: Genesis Colors
Website: Genesis Colors
Contact: Email

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Rivoli Group, Dubai

The Rivoli Group is a private company, with a diverse portfolio of international luxury brands and network of retail outlets within the United Arab Emirates and lower Gulf States. The group has become one of the largest importers and retailers of luxury brands in the Middle East and retails a wide range of product categories, including watches, writing instruments, menswear, accessories, gift items and eyewear.

Brands: Bang and Olufsen, Blancpain, Carl F. Bucherer, Girard-Perregaux, Glashutte, IWC, JM Weston, Longines, Montblanc, Omega, Rado, Rivoli Silks, Tissot, Vertu, Zenith Boutique

Stores: Rivoli, Rivoli Eyezone, Rivoli Arcade, Rivoli Gifts, Rivoli Prestige, Rivoli Textiles, Table Art, Tag Heuer, Younly

LS Company Profile: Rivoli Group
Website: Rivoli Group
Contact: Online Enquiry

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Al Tayer, Dubai

Al Tayer Group is a privately-held, diversified company with operations in 12 countries in the Middle East and beyond. Their operations incorporate automobile sales and service, luxury and lifestyle retail, perfumes and cosmetics distribution and engineering as well as interiors contracting. The Group operates over 180 stores across multiple markets in the Middle East, including Bahrain, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Qatar. Their Insignia division retails 26 luxury fashion and accessories brands in 85 locations throughout the region.

Brands: Armani, Bvlgari, Bloomingdale’s, Banana Republic, Ford, Ferrari, Gucci, Gap, Harvey Nichols, Maserati, Bvlgari, Boucheron, Bottega Veneta, Dolce & Gabbana, Emilio Pucci, Giorgio Armani, Gucci, Ligne Roset, Yves Saint Laurent

LS Company Profile: Al Tayer
Website: Al Tayer
Contact: Email

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Luxasia, Singapore

The Luxasia Group is a large scale distributor of fragrance and beauty brands in Asia. Established in 1986, the business employees over 1500 people and operates in ten countries, namely Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Phillipines, Thailand, VIetnam, India, China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Brands: Aqua di Parma, Burberry, Bvlgari, Calvin Klein, Carolina Herrera, Chloé, Davidoff, Ermenegildo Zegna, Guerlain, Hermès, Issey Miyake, John Paul Gaultier, Lanvin, Marc Jacobs, Nina Ricci, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Stella McCartney, Vera Wang, YSL Beaute

Stores: Escentials

LS Company Profile: Luxasia
Website: Luxasia
Contact: Online Enquiry

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Onward Kashiyama, Tokyo

Onward Kashiyama is a Japanese clothing manufacturer, distributing clothing under its own line as well as producing licensed garments for big name designer brands. Under the licensing business, the group oversees more than 25 different clothing lines around the world as well as Onward branded pieces for sale in its own boutiques. There are more than three dozen stores currently in Japan owned by Onward Kashiyama and multiple more outside Japan in China, South Korea, France, Italy, and Britain.

Brands: Calvin Klein, Jean Paul Gaultier, Sonia Rykiel, Paul Smith

LS Company Profile: Onward Kashiyama
Website: Onward Kashiyama
Contact: Email

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BinHendi Enterprises, Dubai

BinHendi Enterprises operates twenty-nine fashion, jewellery, accessory and food retail outlets in the UAEand GCC, with plans to expand into metropolitan cities Mumbai and Delhi in India. Today the group has successfully introduced more than 75 world-renowned brands to the UAE in the fields of fashion, watches, jewellery, accessories, furniture and fine dining, quickly developing a diverse retail portfolio of the world’s most prestigious brands

Brands: Brioni, Hugo Boss, Paul & Shark, Artioli, Shanghai Tang

LS Company Profile: BinHendi Enterprises
Website: Binhendi Enterprises
Contact: Online Enquiry

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Bosco di Ciliegi, Moscow

Founded in 1991, Bosco di Ciliegi retail and distribute an impressive array of luxury brands throughout Russia, as well as operating multibrand stores Donna Bosco, Bosco Uomo, Bambino Bosco and Bosco Scarpa. The group focus primarily on fashion, accessories, jewellery and timepieces, as well as luxury fragrance and cosmetics. Their stores are located in historic shopping centers such as Petrovsky Passage, Moscow, as well as St. Petersburg, Samara, Yekaterinburg and Milan.

The company operates historical department store GUM on Red Square in Moscow, with a façade extending almost 250m along the eastern side of the square. Bosco di Ciliegi purchased the controlling share of the business in 2005 and currently manages almost 200 stores within the complex.

Brands: Alberta Ferretti, Armani Collezione, Barbara Bui, D&G, Ermenegildo Zegna, ETRO, Hugo Boss, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jil Sander, Kenzo, La Perla, Max Mara, Moschino, Paul Smith, SportMax, Alberto Guardiani, Casadei, Cesare Paciotti

LS Company Profile: Bosco di Ciliegi
Website: Bosco di Ciliegi
Website: GUM
Contact: Email

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Shreyans, Mumbai

Shreyans is a retailer and distributor of luxury mobility, fashion, lifestyle and jewellery brands in India, developed by a USC graduate Ashish Chordia. Chordia identified a tremendous opportunity for luxury brands in the Indian market whilst working for Deloitte in the US, he then began acquiring the rights to some of the world’s most luxurious brands, which he distributes and retails in India today.

Brands: Porsche, Ducatti, Netjets, Dolce & Gabbana, Christian Dior, Etro, Emilio Pucci, Fendi, Van Cleef & Arpels

LS Company Profile: Shreyans
Website: Shreyans
Contact: Email

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Swiss Prestige, Hong Kong

Swiss Prestige represents Swiss watch manufacturers in Asia, specialising in the field of mechanical timepieces. Wth offices in Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, and Taipei, Swiss Prestige also represents well-known Swiss watch brands in China, Taiwan, Philippines, Thailand and Australia.

Brands: Corum, Eberhard & Co, Greubel Forsey, Hublot, Oris, Roland Iten

LS Company Profile: Swiss Prestige
Website: Swiss Prestige
Contact: Email

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Sparkle Roll Group, Hong Kong

Sparkle Roll Group is a distributor of top-tier luxury goods in the People’s Republic of China, distributing ultra-luxury automobiles, haute horlogeries, haute jewellery and renowned French wines.

Brands: Bentley, Lambourghini, Rolls Royce, Richard Mille, Parmigiani, DeWitt, Boucheron, Federico Buccellati

LS Company Profile: Sparkle Roll Group
Website: Sparkle Roll Group
Contact: Email

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DKSH Luxury & Lifestyle, Shanghai

DKSH provides market expansion, distribution and retailing services for high-end lifestyle watches, accessories, apparel and household luxury goods across Asia. Their Luxury & Lifestyle division has almost 9,000 retail points of sale, ten company boutiques, 152 shop-in-shops, and 453 brand corners with 323 specialists working in 11 countries. Core markets include China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, and South Korea.

LS Company Profile: DKSH
Website: DKSH Luxury Lifestyle
Contact: Online Enquiry

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Mercury, Moscow

Mercury began as a jewellery shop in Moscow over 15 years ago and now generates more than 1 billion euros n annual sales. The group retails and distributes a wide selection of the world’s top luxury goods, including fashion and accessories, jewellery and luxury automobiles.

The group also operates luxury department store Tsum, located in a six-story historical building at Petrovka street. It carries more than 1000 brands of fashionable apparel, perfumery and jewelry, as well as “TSUM Globus Gourmet” gastronome, a fusion restaurant, a cigar room, a café and Champagne-bar by Veuve Clicquot.

Brands: Bentley, Maserati, Gucci, Prada, Chopard, Dolce & Gabbana and more

LS Company Profile: Mercury
Website: Mercury
Website: TSUM

Source: Luxurysociety.com

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Four Powerful Strategies For How Luxury Brands Should Use Social Media

Luxury brands have a specific challenge in using social media: the need to retain the aura of exclusivity around their brands even as they embrace the inclusive, accessible nature of social media.

Here’s the solution: luxury brands should use social media in a manner that awareness of the brand’s promise is accessible while achievement of the brand’s promise is exclusive.

Here are four powerful strategies for how luxury brands should use social media to become accessible to fans but still remain exclusive for customers –

Luxury Brands Social Media

 

The four strategies are positioned along the accessibility-exclusivity continuum

1. Create awards, magazines and communities to interpret luxury lifestyle, fashion and design with your brand’s unique lens. Examples include LMVH NownessThierre Mugler WomanityD&G SwideWyndham Resorts Women on Their WayBMW Mini Space and Rolex Awards.

2. Leverage your brand’s desirability to create sharable digital artifacts. Examples include the Godiva virtual gift shop on Facebook and Hermes ties posters on Facebook.

3. Bring together designers, artists and customers to share how they interpret your brand. Examples include Burberry Art of the TrenchMac Artist TweetsCoach Design a Tote Contest and Sheraton Resorts Better When Shared.

4. Create a private invite-only social network like A Small World to underline your brand’s exclusivity. Examples include the Generation Benz community.

For more, do read (and share) our comprehensive guide to how luxury brands should use social media to become accessible to fans but still remain exclusive for customers.

Source: Thesocialcustomer.com

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Fashion Research Institute Collaborates with Intel Labs to Bring Premium Digital Content to Science Sim

“Content is King” has long been the mantra of the gurus of the Internet.  And now, Fashion Research Institute has teamed up with Intel Labs to provide users with a myriad of choices in premium digital content to help give those users a solid start to their Science Sim efforts.

Fashion Research Institute has been collaborating with Intel Labs since 2009, helping to push the limits of content development.

“Compelling content will drive the growth of virtual world grids; performance is essential to sustain that growth. But compelling content must be there first for the platform to host the business models to follow, including ours,” says FRI CEO Shenlei Winkler. “In particular, our research, which is supported by studying more than 65,000 new users to virtual worlds, shows that premium avatar customization content in particular aids in user uptake and deeper immersion to the platform”

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FRI provided Science Sim with six full avatars in various skin tones for male and females with multiple facial hair and makeup options, as well as a range of clothing, jewelry, shoes, and hairstyles. Additionally, FRI has provided landscaping, texture packs and buildings of various sorts.

“We were thrilled to have the opportunity to continue to collaborate with Intel Labs to bring over 800 items of inventory to the Science Sim project,” says Winkler.

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Along with recent performance enhancements, we are laying a foundation for further exploration of new problem solving methodologies. Fashion Research Institute is collaborating in this effort through their recent content contribution,” says Dr. Mic Bowman, Principal Engineer, Intel Labs.

Teach Parallel, the Intel Software Network TV, recently interviwed Dr. Mic Bowman, the principal engineer in Intel Labs, who leads the Virtual World Infrastructure research project, in which he discusses advances in Science Sim and the FRI content contribution. http://blip.tv/play/g5FLgoSJXgA%2Em4v

 

About Fashion Research Institute, Inc.: FRI is at the forefront of developing innovative design & merchandising solutions for the apparel industry.  They research and develop products and systems for the fashion industry that sweepingly address wasteful business and production practices. All items included in the Science Sim content library are covered by a license.  The class of the content determines the exact license. Scripts are covered by BSD, GPL, Creative Commons, and Public Domain licenses. All other content contributed is covered by Fashion Research Institute’s content license.

Science Sim is part of an evolution toward online 3D experiences that look, act and feel real. Sometimes dubbed the “3D internet,” Intel Labs refers to this technology trend as immersive connected experiences, or ICE. ScienceSim is differentiated from most virtual world environments
by its open source architecture. ScienceSim leverages open source building blocks (installation utilities, management tools, client viewers, etc.) based on OpenSimulator (OpenSim) software.

(Image courtesy Fashion Research Institute, Inc.)

Source: Hypergridbusiness.com

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