Tag Archives: Place

The Marketing Mix – The Official 5 P’s of Marketing

The major marketing management decisions can be classified in one of the following five categories:

The Marketing Mix – The 5 P’s

  • Product
  • Price
  • Place (distribution)
  • Promotion
  • People

The Marketing Mix


Product 
 
People

Place 
 

Target
Market
– The Consumer  

Price 
 

Promotion 
 

These variables are known as the marketing mix or the 5 P’s of marketing. They are the variables that marketing managers can control in order to best satisfy customers in the target market. The firm attempts to generate a positive response in the target market by blending these five marketing mix variables in an optimal manner.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Product

The product is the physical product or service offered to the consumer. In the case of physical products, it also refers to any services or conveniences that are part of the offering. Product decisions include aspects such as function, appearance, packaging, service, warranty, etc.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Price

Pricing decisions should take into account profit margins and the probable pricing response of competitors. Pricing includes not only the list price, but also discounts, financing, and other options such as leasing.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Promotion

Promotion decisions are those related to communicating and selling to potential consumers. Since these costs can be large in proportion to the product price, a break-even analysis should be performed when making promotion decisions. It is useful to know the value of a customer in order to determine whether additional customers are worth the cost of acquiring them. Promotion decisions involve advertising, public relations, media types, etc.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

People

People decisions are those related to customer service.  How do you want your workers to appear to your customers?  There are a range of service profiles from service with a smile – McDonald’s, to classier Nordstroms, to plain rude – Ed Debevic’s.  The function of people to present an appearance,  an attitude, etc.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Place

Place (or placement) decisions are those associated with channels of distribution that serve as the means for getting the product to the target customers. The distribution system performs transactional, logistical, and facilitating functions. Distribution decisions include market coverage, channel member selection, logistics, and levels of service.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

A Summary Table of the Marketing Mix

The following table summarizes the marketing mix decisions, including a list of some of the aspects of each of the 4Ps.

Summary of Marketing Mix Decisions

Product People Price Place Promotion
FunctionalityAppearance

Quality

Packaging

Brand

Warranty

Service/Support

Service

AppearanceUniforms

Attitude

List priceDiscounts

Allowances

Financing

Leasing options

Channel membersChannel motivation

Market coverage

Locations

Logistics

Service levels

AdvertisingPersonal selling

Public relations

Message

Media

Budget

Source: facweb.eths.k12.il.us

Advertisements

1 Comment

Filed under Business, Business Plan, Competitive Analysis, Consumer Psychology, Fashion Marketing, Management, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Methodology, Niche Market, Place, Price, Product, Promotion, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research, Research, Target Market, Trends

5Ps Marketing Mix Theories: Price, Place, Promotion, Package & Product VS Product, Price, Promotion, Physical Distribution & People

5P theory thinks that Marketing Tactics includes Price, Place, Promotion, Package and Product.

According to survey data of transnational corporations,there are 63% consumers do a product decision according to the packaging and decoration. For the housewife who would be attracked easily by the perfect packaging and decoration and their consume would be more than the originall 45%.Thus,The packaging acts a important role in the marketing practise.So,we make Package as the fifth P of 4Ps marketing theory and make a team called 5Ps

The Package Tactics of 5Ps marketing theory

Package and Products

*For  The characteristics of cotton f, strengthen packaging of wrinkle-free, mildew, moisture storage function to extend product life;
* To make the product emergence into products, in packaging design fully integrated into the commercial information, trade mark, functional descriptions and instructions such as essential elements;
* Combine features of the product attributes (size, raw materials, selling point), select packaging materials, targeted to selected internal and external packaging.

4P theory emphasizes the traditional angle from the enterprise product, the inverse of the new marketing 4P theory emphasizes products from the consumer angle. For packaging, from a consumer point of view we need to consider the following:

* Similar packaging for consumer awareness mode (packaging appearance, color, layout, materials, specifications, etc.), what you want to design custom packages to meet consumer awareness to save the cost of information dissemination;
* The face of market information and interference, can rambled to make creative packaging, but only fully express product attributes for consumers to see that this is what the creative product packaging

Package and Price

Packaging materials costs and design costs: different materials, specifications and workmanship direct impact on cost. Stall design and different design is not a fee, but do not compress to reduce costs, design costs, because no matter how the price of packaging materials costs, the costs must be reflected through the design and its value; * production costs and logistics Cost: both are made by hand or machine and cost of production are inseparable, and packaging finished products, its transportation costs in the logistics can not be ignored;

In fact, good packaging does not necessarily require high cost, and good packaging design for the goods often add a lot of commercial value, the following package for the goods described on the simple ways to add value:

* Meet the consumption habits of creative cognition packaging (shape, color, layout, materials, specifications, etc.) is to add value to commodity prices means the most; * design of packaging a consumer’s perspective, to facilitate the use of portable, to facilitate their with post-processing; * ingenuity and consistent brand idea of packaging design and brand value for the brand Zengtian culture; * Packaging is not equal to high-value high-cost packaging, and environmental trends to meet the green packaging design for the unique charm of goods;

Package and Place

* In order to save costs and distribution logistics consumption, it is necessary flow of time compression and packaging sectors. In the strength permitting, you can set up their own logistics center and distribution center;
* Flow of goods in the process of channel has its own into a fixed amount of packaging, do not ignore the “big package” role, in order to channel business point of humanity (such as for the removal), and brand design “big package.” This is also the channel for dissemination of company brand to one of the ways.
* Sincere, open and objective provider to receive channels on the packaging of the proposal to allow commercial and enterprise channel through thick and thin, masters;
* Through channels to receive the consumer packaging business evaluation, timely adjustment of packaging strategies.

Package and Promotion
Marketing in the new theory of the inverse 4P, promotions, and consumers understood how to communicate effectively. In packaging, is actually to communicate with the market as an important vector.

* For different types, different grades of product sales mix, through a unified package;
* In the package purchase promotional gifts or interest coupons, and strengthen consumer spending motivation;
* Into a simple market research questionnaires, interactive communication with consumers in a timely manner;
* Place the fashion information booklet, to enrich the brand of soft spread;
* Place simple and practical combination of the products and other goods using small volumes; (such as socks match shoes, pants, skirt)

5Ps Marketing Theory

Other opinions about 5Ps Marketing Theory

5 P’s to Effective Marketing
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
You’ve done everything right in your site design. Your navigation is clear and simple to use, graphics load quickly and the design is pleasing as easy to look at. Even the best design cannot guarantee your site success. If you want to succeed and stand out, you will need to incorporate important marketing elements into your site’s design.

The essential elements of marketing are easy to remember and include the following:eb product, price, promotion, physical distribution and people.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Product
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Identify what it is that you are really selling. Don’t worry about complicated schemes, just focus on making it clear what you are selling. Start by identifying the benefits of your product. Be sure to point out the things that your customers can really identify with. It is a good idea to focus on how the product solves problems and adds value for your customer base.

Once you’ve identified the benefits and values, take a step back and ask the hard question, “So what?” This forces you to uncover the core benefits of your product and anticipate your customers’ concerns. You will also discover even deeper benefits and value that you never even thought of for your product.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Price
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
What numbers can say about your product. Internet buyers are more price sensitive than traditional consumers. Why? Because they can easily shop around for competitive pricing and features. Your pricing should be competitive, yet still allow you to turn a profit. Your pricing structure can say a lot about your product.

If priced too high, it can drive customers away, while a price that is too low may leave potential customers wondering what is wrong with the product. Find ways to create values. Justify your pricing. Spell out what customers get. If it is 24/7-customer support and weekly updates, let them know.

A low price shouldn’t be the only competitive edge your product has. While the price may motivate customers to buy, don’t forget to back it up with features and value because if price is the only thing that entices your customers, rest assured that someday, someone will beat your price and nab your customers.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Promotion
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Promote on your site. Don’t spend all the time and effort trying to attract visitors without promoting your products and services. Motivate your customers to positive action by adding call to action statements throughout your site. List testimonials and customer statements about the value of the product. If your product is related to other Web sites, list links to those sites for customers to look at. Case studies are also a good way to demonstrate how your product produces results or solutions in a variety of situations. Don’t overlook the traditional promotions that tout “saving up to 15%” or getting added support. Offer value-added services.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Physical Distribution
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Distribution beyond product delivery. The distribution of your product goes beyond just getting the product to your customers. Don’t forget to make it easy for them to not only receive the product, but also use and return it if necessary. If the product requires assembly or installation be sure that clear concise instructions are included and even available online.

Have a clear return policy indicating time limits and any other conditions well in advance. Make them aware from the beginning instead of surprising them down the road. In the end, even a customer who returned a product can still be a satisfied customer-based on their experience in dealing with you and your site.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
People
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Provide customer service. Two-way communication can help you build relationships with your customers and result in more closed sales. Internet shoppers are fairly independent, but can become easily disillusioned with your site and product if the information they need is not accessible.

Even if you have a small operation, customer support is fairly easy to implement. Have clear links to support information throughout the site including the purchasing process. Any place where transition is required should have clear links just in case customers need help.

Make support policies clear. If you plan to offer support only for certain hours of the day, indicate that on your page. Set expectations. Let your customers know when you’ll get back to them. It takes you an average of 3 hours to respond to an email, let customers know. People, in general, are easier to work with when they know what to expect ahead of time.

The 5 P’s of marketing can help you improve your site where it matters most-in the content and overall customer satisfaction of your site. By combining the elements of product, pricing, promotion, physical distribution and people with your site’s design elements, you’ll be on your way to more success on the Internet.

Source: onlinembawiki.com

1 Comment

Filed under Business, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Retailer, Management, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Merchandising, Place, Price, Product, Promotion

Gucci’s Digital Flagship: Crafting an Intensively Attentive Online Environment

On the eve of Gucci’s 90th anniversary as a luxury retailer, the firm’s CEO, Patrizio di Marco, describes why digital innovation is more than just a matter of relevance and modernity.

2681_patriziodimarco_mediumBesides being one of the most active luxury brands in the social media space – with nearly 3.2 million Facebook fans and a host of online initiatives including the live streaming of its catwalk shows and smart phone applications – Gucci is also the first luxury brand to launch a digital flagship.

“Gucci was in fact a pioneer when it launched its US e-commerce site in 2002 and we [still] believe that new media and new technologies represent a valuable complementary communication and business channel.”

“ The digital flagship is destined to become our highest volume store in the world ”

According to Di Marco, Gucci’s new online retail destination takes advantage of the most innovative technologies available today, integrating rich content, shopping and social networking to provide the site’s monthly 2.5 million unique visitors with an aesthetic and customer-oriented experience that replicates the one customers have when immersed in one of the brand’s signature flagships stores in Rome, New York, London or Shanghai.

From a strategic perspective, Gucci’s recent aggressive foray into digital media channels is a concerted effort to drive the digital flagship to outperform all brick-and-mortar store sales.

“The digital flagship is destined to become our highest volume store in the world, and should be the final destination for any search on the net: whether you are seeking out Gucci through a search engine, or are one of our 3.2 million Facebook fans, or are one of the over 840,000 people who have downloaded our Gucci App or are one of our 32,000 Twitter followers.”

While traditional luxury marketing focused on the protected environment of exclusive networks and publications, Gucci has been at the forefront of the movement which challenges the status quo by utilizing the web to expose the brand. In September of 2010, for instance, the brand invited its fans to virtually join the womenswear fashion show and even showcased the commentary and digital content of fans on a global site alongside the show’s live stream.

“One of the reasons Gucci has been successful in reaching new customers is because of the attention we have paid to the internet… The current site operates in 17 countries in 8 different languages, while e-commerce is offered in 12 countries with over 2000 skus available online.”

The brand has also integrated social media into the heart of the online shopping experience. A live Twitter feed, an interface with the Gucci official Facebook fan page and product page link to ready-to-wear items straight off the catwalk, allows visitors to truly engage with the brand.

Di Marco, together with Frida Giannini, Gucci’s creative director, have championed social networks as an integral part of the new site, suggesting they are a natural extension of the fashion shopping experience in the real world which is often shared and enjoyed with friends as well.

With such an active role in digital media, Gucci is not only using these channels as a very direct and content-rich form of outreach to tap into a broader audience but also to uncover metrics and insight on the site’s visitors in order to become a more attentive luxury brand – something which is difficult to do with customers entering brick-and-mortar stores.

“[Digital] is allowing us to develop more personal and constant relationships with current and prospective consumers. We are also able to understand the desires and attitudes of our customers more quickly and easily through the information that is available to us, which is helping us to be more responsive. Ultimately, our aim is to offer the same values and experience to an online customer or visitor as we do in our stores.”

Source: Luxurysociety.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Business, Celebrity, Design, Digital Creative, Digital Marketing, E-Commerce, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Retailer, Gucci, Interactive Campaign, Interactive Marketing, Interactive Marketing Online, Internet Marketing, Interview, Luxury Brand, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Media Outlet, Networking, New Product Marketing, Niche Market, Online Marketing, Online Product Marketing, Online Shopping, Place, Presentation, Product Advertising, Product Placement, Promotion, Publicity, Social Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Target Market, Technology, Trends, Video, Viral, Viral Campaign, Viral Video, Web Marketing, Website

Oscar de la Renta’s CEO: “why e-commerce works & how social media serves the fashion brand’s designers & merchandisers”

When the Improbable Is Also Profitable

2680_alexbolen_mediumBecause today’s luxury goods consumers are present across numerous channels, being there for them wherever they may be is a crucial aspect of business to get right, says Alex Bolen, Oscar de la Renta’s chief executive – and the man responsible for the fashion brand’s foray into e-commerce and social media.

“Our presence online has suggested to me that consumers are very quickly adjusting their behaviour to new modes of shopping and we need to really be out at the forefront of it. We have had many surprise anecdotes from having our brand online, anything from a $50,000 chinchilla coat sale through our website to completing a sale for a bridal dress via Twitter.”

For many luxury fashion brands, e-commerce has still not yet eclipsed the performance of physical stores but a very significant consumer appetite is present.

“ Our customer has taught us that there are moments where she will want to spend hours in a store shopping and there are moments where it’s a quick impulsive purchase ”

“When we first began thinking about e-commerce three to four years ago I was very sceptical that our brand would not fare well as, at that time, we were not particularly optimized in products that don’t have size requirements. Our bread and butter product is a $4 – 5,000 cocktail dress which is very fit intensive, in fact the perfectly fitted garment is an important part of our brand and this is something that seemed to me didn’t jive well with an online shopping experience.”

“I was wrong about that. Surprisingly we have had a very good reaction to our fit intensive products online. What we found in retrospect is that customers will order two different sizes and keep one of them.”

“Our customer has taught us that there are moments where she will want to spend hours in a store shopping and there are moments where it’s a quick impulsive purchase – as a luxury brand it’s important to us that we are present wherever our customer is.”

According to Bolen, e-commerce currently drives only 10% of the luxury fashion brand but it is growing very quickly. In a relatively short period of time, he forecasts Oscardelarenta.com to become the brand’s most prolific door.

One of the ways that the brand is extending its outreach to drive customers back to the site is through social media. Oscar de la Renta has taken a very creative approach to emerging media platforms such as creating a unique online personality for the brand on Twitter called OscarPRgirl. The brand uses Twitter as a channel to provide unique insight into the world of Oscar de la Renta and to engage with entirely new audiences as well supporting the interests of existing ones.

“We want to broaden our array of services to our customers as much as possible and services include consuming content. Everyone who goes to Oscardelarenta.com is a potential shopper – maybe they are a shopper today maybe they are a shopper in six months. As a brand we need to figure out a way to engage them and we need to offer services for wherever that person may stand on the potential customer spectrum.”“As a brand, we want to augment the initiatives online started by OscarPRgirl and speak more about what we are doing by explaining what our brand is about in more than just 140 characters. This means we want to extend our communications to areas such as rich video content and audio content.”

For a luxury brand like Oscar de la Renta, social media is proving to be much more than just a PR tool but one that is feeding business insights about the brand back to the company. “For Oscar de la Renta, social media has provided us with information on what our customers think, what they need, what they want and what they expect of us. From our jewellery offerings, accessories, scarves, etc. we have made many merchandising choices [and] many design choices based on feedback we got online.”“I am a big believer that you have to listen to your customers, and the online world has given us a new way to listen to our customers and we have learned to position ourselves based on what we hear.”

Source: Luxurysociety.com

Leave a comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Agency, Business, Celebrity, Commercial, Design, Digital Creative, Digital Marketing, E-Commerce, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Retailer, Interactive Campaign, Interactive Marketing, Interactive Marketing Online, Internet Marketing, Interview, Luxury Brand, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Media Outlet, Merchandising, Networking, New Product Marketing, Niche Market, Online, Online Marketing, Online Product Marketing, Online Shopping, Place, Presentation, Product Advertising, Product Placement, Promotion, Publicity, Social Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Target Market, Technology, Trends, Video, Viral, Viral Campaign, Viral Video, Web Marketing, Website

16 Key Luxury Fashion Brand Distributors

2628_4154995347_fc6c5c1ae2_medium

A round up of sixteen of the most prominent luxury goods distributors, including Bosco di Ciliegi, Bluebell, Swiss Prestige and Chalhoub Group.

Despite their inherant focus on brand control, luxury manufacturers have commonly relied on local distributors to introduce products to new markets, acknowledging that whilst they might know what is best for their brand communications, design and development, they may not necessarily understand local cultures, retail climates and stores. Whilst houses retain control of distribution in home-markets of Europe and the US, markets such as the United Arab Emirates, Asia and Russia, are often leveraged through a network of premium distributors.

Luxury Society investigated the distribution market and presents a round up of the most influential groups around the world. For a complete listing of distribution groups, we invite you to explore the Luxury Society directory and discover further titles in your region.

2555_valiram_group_logo_medium

Valiram, Malaysia

The Valiram Group operates high fashion and luxury-goods boutiques in domestic and airport retail environments, housing both branded and multi-branded stores that feature some of the world’s finest luxury brands. Recently the group began fragrance distribution in Malaysia, for Cartier, Lalique and Asprey, with plans to grow the business to their other serviced regions, Singapore, Indonesia and Australia.

Brands: Bally, Bvlgari, Cartier, Chanel, Chloé, Chopard, Coach, Dunhill, Fendi, Giuseppe Zanotti, Godiva, Hermès, Hugo Boss, Jimmy Choo, Montblanc, Omega, Rolex, Salvatore Ferragamo, TAG Heuer, Tod’s, Vertu, Versace

Stores: Eye Spy, Fashion Gallery, Flying Emporium, Luxury Fashion, Podium Motorsport, Swiss Watch Gallery, Vie Beauté, Wear + When

LS Company Profile: Valiram Group
Website: Valiram Group
Contact: Email

2546_bluebell_group_logo_medium

Bluebell, Hong Kong

The Bluebell Group is an importer, agency and distributor of exclusive lifestyle products, managing a portfolio of fashion, accessories, perfumes and cosmetics, leather goods and homewares brands. They work closely with international brand owners to tailor distribution and marketing direction to match each brand’s strategy and have built a presence in China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand.

Brands: Paul Smith, Céline, Givenchy, Fendi, Blumarine, Kenzo, Twenty8Twelve, Moschino, Anya Hindmarch, Barbara Bui, Trussardi, Jimmy Choo, Louis Vuitton, Celine, Marc Jacobs, Loewe, Dior, Fendi, Davidoff

LS Company Profile: Bluebell Group
Website: Bluebell Group
Contact: Email

2548_chalhoub_group_logo_medium

Chalhoub Group, Dubai

The Chalhoub Group specialises in the retail and distribution of renowned brands within the sectors of Beauty, Fashion and Gifts. They represent a portfolio of over 280 luxury brands, manage over 350 retail outlets and have a presence in 14 countries, partnering with prestigious houses such as Baccarat, Christofle, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton and Nina Ricci.

Brands: Fendi, Swarovski, Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, Céline, Chanel, Prada, Givenchy, Calvin Klein, Barbara Bui, Christian Louboutin, Dsquared, Kenzo, Lanvin, Paule Ka

Stores: Tangara, Faces, Scarpe, Tagz

LS Company Profile: Chalhoub Group
Website: Challhoub
Contact: Email

2549_fj_benjamin_logo_medium

FJ Benjamin, Singapore

FJ Benjamin developes retail and distribution networks for international luxury and lifestyle brands across Asia, as well as handling their promotion and brand building within the region. The public company, headquartered in Singapore, was listed on the Singapore Exchange in November 1996. It has offices in 8 cities, represents over 20 brands and operates over 170 retail stores/shop-in-shops, retailing and distributing luxury and lifestyle products and time pieces across Southeast Asia and Australia.

Brands: Céline, Rado, Givenchy, Goyard, DeWitt, Girard-Perregaux, Victorinox Swiss Army

LS Company Profile: FJ Benjamin
Website: FJ Benjamin
Contact: Email

2551_genesis_colors_logo_medium

Genesis Colors, New Dehli

Originally spearheading the corporatisation of the Indian fashion industry, building buisnesses for premium designer labels such as Satya Paul, Deepika Gehani, Samsaara, Shobhaa De and Bwitch, Genesis Colors, forayed into the marketing and distribution of world-renowned luxury brands in India, through its new division, Genesis Luxury Fashion. The group services the Indian market through branded stores.

Brands: Burberry, Paul Smith, Canali, Kenzo, Just Cavalli, Bottega Veneta, Aigner, Jimmy Choo.

LS Company Profile: Genesis Colors
Website: Genesis Colors
Contact: Email

2553_rivoli_group_logo_medium

Rivoli Group, Dubai

The Rivoli Group is a private company, with a diverse portfolio of international luxury brands and network of retail outlets within the United Arab Emirates and lower Gulf States. The group has become one of the largest importers and retailers of luxury brands in the Middle East and retails a wide range of product categories, including watches, writing instruments, menswear, accessories, gift items and eyewear.

Brands: Bang and Olufsen, Blancpain, Carl F. Bucherer, Girard-Perregaux, Glashutte, IWC, JM Weston, Longines, Montblanc, Omega, Rado, Rivoli Silks, Tissot, Vertu, Zenith Boutique

Stores: Rivoli, Rivoli Eyezone, Rivoli Arcade, Rivoli Gifts, Rivoli Prestige, Rivoli Textiles, Table Art, Tag Heuer, Younly

LS Company Profile: Rivoli Group
Website: Rivoli Group
Contact: Online Enquiry

2544_al_tayer_logo_medium

Al Tayer, Dubai

Al Tayer Group is a privately-held, diversified company with operations in 12 countries in the Middle East and beyond. Their operations incorporate automobile sales and service, luxury and lifestyle retail, perfumes and cosmetics distribution and engineering as well as interiors contracting. The Group operates over 180 stores across multiple markets in the Middle East, including Bahrain, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Qatar. Their Insignia division retails 26 luxury fashion and accessories brands in 85 locations throughout the region.

Brands: Armani, Bvlgari, Bloomingdale’s, Banana Republic, Ford, Ferrari, Gucci, Gap, Harvey Nichols, Maserati, Bvlgari, Boucheron, Bottega Veneta, Dolce & Gabbana, Emilio Pucci, Giorgio Armani, Gucci, Ligne Roset, Yves Saint Laurent

LS Company Profile: Al Tayer
Website: Al Tayer
Contact: Email

2558_luxasia_logo_medium

Luxasia, Singapore

The Luxasia Group is a large scale distributor of fragrance and beauty brands in Asia. Established in 1986, the business employees over 1500 people and operates in ten countries, namely Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, Phillipines, Thailand, VIetnam, India, China, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Brands: Aqua di Parma, Burberry, Bvlgari, Calvin Klein, Carolina Herrera, Chloé, Davidoff, Ermenegildo Zegna, Guerlain, Hermès, Issey Miyake, John Paul Gaultier, Lanvin, Marc Jacobs, Nina Ricci, Prada, Salvatore Ferragamo, Stella McCartney, Vera Wang, YSL Beaute

Stores: Escentials

LS Company Profile: Luxasia
Website: Luxasia
Contact: Online Enquiry

2552_onward_logo_medium

Onward Kashiyama, Tokyo

Onward Kashiyama is a Japanese clothing manufacturer, distributing clothing under its own line as well as producing licensed garments for big name designer brands. Under the licensing business, the group oversees more than 25 different clothing lines around the world as well as Onward branded pieces for sale in its own boutiques. There are more than three dozen stores currently in Japan owned by Onward Kashiyama and multiple more outside Japan in China, South Korea, France, Italy, and Britain.

Brands: Calvin Klein, Jean Paul Gaultier, Sonia Rykiel, Paul Smith

LS Company Profile: Onward Kashiyama
Website: Onward Kashiyama
Contact: Email

2545_binhendi_logo_medium

BinHendi Enterprises, Dubai

BinHendi Enterprises operates twenty-nine fashion, jewellery, accessory and food retail outlets in the UAEand GCC, with plans to expand into metropolitan cities Mumbai and Delhi in India. Today the group has successfully introduced more than 75 world-renowned brands to the UAE in the fields of fashion, watches, jewellery, accessories, furniture and fine dining, quickly developing a diverse retail portfolio of the world’s most prestigious brands

Brands: Brioni, Hugo Boss, Paul & Shark, Artioli, Shanghai Tang

LS Company Profile: BinHendi Enterprises
Website: Binhendi Enterprises
Contact: Online Enquiry

2547_bosco_di_ciliegi_logo_medium

Bosco di Ciliegi, Moscow

Founded in 1991, Bosco di Ciliegi retail and distribute an impressive array of luxury brands throughout Russia, as well as operating multibrand stores Donna Bosco, Bosco Uomo, Bambino Bosco and Bosco Scarpa. The group focus primarily on fashion, accessories, jewellery and timepieces, as well as luxury fragrance and cosmetics. Their stores are located in historic shopping centers such as Petrovsky Passage, Moscow, as well as St. Petersburg, Samara, Yekaterinburg and Milan.

The company operates historical department store GUM on Red Square in Moscow, with a façade extending almost 250m along the eastern side of the square. Bosco di Ciliegi purchased the controlling share of the business in 2005 and currently manages almost 200 stores within the complex.

Brands: Alberta Ferretti, Armani Collezione, Barbara Bui, D&G, Ermenegildo Zegna, ETRO, Hugo Boss, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jil Sander, Kenzo, La Perla, Max Mara, Moschino, Paul Smith, SportMax, Alberto Guardiani, Casadei, Cesare Paciotti

LS Company Profile: Bosco di Ciliegi
Website: Bosco di Ciliegi
Website: GUM
Contact: Email

2554_shreyans_logo_medium

Shreyans, Mumbai

Shreyans is a retailer and distributor of luxury mobility, fashion, lifestyle and jewellery brands in India, developed by a USC graduate Ashish Chordia. Chordia identified a tremendous opportunity for luxury brands in the Indian market whilst working for Deloitte in the US, he then began acquiring the rights to some of the world’s most luxurious brands, which he distributes and retails in India today.

Brands: Porsche, Ducatti, Netjets, Dolce & Gabbana, Christian Dior, Etro, Emilio Pucci, Fendi, Van Cleef & Arpels

LS Company Profile: Shreyans
Website: Shreyans
Contact: Email

2560_swiss_prestige_logo_medium

Swiss Prestige, Hong Kong

Swiss Prestige represents Swiss watch manufacturers in Asia, specialising in the field of mechanical timepieces. Wth offices in Hong Kong, Beijing, Shanghai, and Taipei, Swiss Prestige also represents well-known Swiss watch brands in China, Taiwan, Philippines, Thailand and Australia.

Brands: Corum, Eberhard & Co, Greubel Forsey, Hublot, Oris, Roland Iten

LS Company Profile: Swiss Prestige
Website: Swiss Prestige
Contact: Email

2561_sparkle_roll_group_logo_medium

Sparkle Roll Group, Hong Kong

Sparkle Roll Group is a distributor of top-tier luxury goods in the People’s Republic of China, distributing ultra-luxury automobiles, haute horlogeries, haute jewellery and renowned French wines.

Brands: Bentley, Lambourghini, Rolls Royce, Richard Mille, Parmigiani, DeWitt, Boucheron, Federico Buccellati

LS Company Profile: Sparkle Roll Group
Website: Sparkle Roll Group
Contact: Email

2559_dksh_logo_medium

DKSH Luxury & Lifestyle, Shanghai

DKSH provides market expansion, distribution and retailing services for high-end lifestyle watches, accessories, apparel and household luxury goods across Asia. Their Luxury & Lifestyle division has almost 9,000 retail points of sale, ten company boutiques, 152 shop-in-shops, and 453 brand corners with 323 specialists working in 11 countries. Core markets include China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, and South Korea.

LS Company Profile: DKSH
Website: DKSH Luxury Lifestyle
Contact: Online Enquiry

2550_mercury_logo_medium

Mercury, Moscow

Mercury began as a jewellery shop in Moscow over 15 years ago and now generates more than 1 billion euros n annual sales. The group retails and distributes a wide selection of the world’s top luxury goods, including fashion and accessories, jewellery and luxury automobiles.

The group also operates luxury department store Tsum, located in a six-story historical building at Petrovka street. It carries more than 1000 brands of fashionable apparel, perfumery and jewelry, as well as “TSUM Globus Gourmet” gastronome, a fusion restaurant, a cigar room, a café and Champagne-bar by Veuve Clicquot.

Brands: Bentley, Maserati, Gucci, Prada, Chopard, Dolce & Gabbana and more

LS Company Profile: Mercury
Website: Mercury
Website: TSUM

Source: Luxurysociety.com

2 Comments

Filed under Business, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Marketing, Luxury Brand, Marketing, Media Outlet, Merchandising, Place, Sunglasses

Google Boutiques.com, a World of Fashion

Google unveils a new shopping portal, Boutiques.com. It showcases the power of search in the world of fashion. You can shop and choose from a variety of styles, designs and collections of famous designers and stylists. Shoppers can easily catch up with the trend because it allows users to save likes or dislikes in the site.

Shopping is the watchword today. Almost everyone around the globe is on a Shopping spree. Google understands this and thus, has launched a new shopping portal entitled Boutiques.com to add on to its almost full kitty of world class products and services. The portal, as they say, combines the goodness of both social and search. It allows for finding and discovering styles and fashions collections that have been put together by renowned celebrities, designers, stylists and fashion experts, to name a few.

Through this site, Google will be able to analyze the tastes of consumers by ways of a number of clicks, Google Trend data, computer vision and machine learning technology and ultimately, letting them know the entire world of fashion. As is the case with Youtube,  whenever a user logs into his/her account, the site would know the user’s taste for fashion and recommend those results that suit the taste.

Google got the technology from its acquisition of Like.com, along with which came the technology team behind it. They were already working hard on that and had also launched a site of their own called WhatToWear.com. The team at Google now consists of PhDs in Computer Science and Fashion Designers and Stylists. In fact, it is an amalgamation of computer nerds and fashion nerds. Altogether, the team is working on creating a new route to browse, find and buy world class fashion under one roof.

Source: Marketingconversation.com by ROBIN PANGILINAN

Leave a comment

Filed under Ad Campaign, Advertising, Business, Digital Marketing, E-Commerce, Fashion, Fashion Industry, Fashion Jobs, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Retailer, Interactive Campaign, Interactive Marketing, Interactive Marketing Online, Internet Marketing, Luxury Brand, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Media Outlet, Merchandising, Methodology, New Product Marketing, Niche Market, Online, Online Marketing, Online Product Marketing, Online Shopping, Place, Price, Product, Product Advertising, Product Placement, Promotion, Publicity, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research, Research, Social Marketing, Social Media Marketing, Target Market, Technology, Trends, Web Marketing, Website, Window Display

How to Define your Target Market

To build a solid foundation for your business, you must first identify your typical customer and tailor your marketing pitch accordingly.

With the current state of the economy, having a well-defined target market is more important than ever. No one can afford to target everyone. Small businesses can effectively compete with large companies by targeting a niche market.

Many businesses say they target “anyone interested in my services.” Some may say they target small business owners, homeowners, or stay-at-home moms. All of these targets are too general.

Targeting a specific market does not mean that you have to exclude people that do not fit your criteria from buying from you. Rather, target marketing allows you to focus your marketing dollars and brand message on a specific market that is more likely to buy from you than other markets. This is a much more affordable, efficient, and effective way to reach potential clients and generate business.

For example, an interior design company could choose to market to homeowners between the ages of 35-65 with incomes of $150,000+ in the Baton RougeLouisiana, market. To define the market even further, the company could choose to target only those interested in kitchen and bath remodeling and traditional styles. This market could be broken down into two niches: parents on the go and retiring baby boomers.

With a clearly defined target audience, it is much easier to determine where and how to market your company. Here are some tips to help you define your target market.

How to Define Your Target Market: Look at Your Current Customer Base

Who are your current customers, and why do they buy from you? Look for common characteristics and interests. Which ones bring in the most business? It is very likely that other people like them could also benefit from your product/service.

Dig Deeper: Upselling: Dig Deeper Into Your Customer Base

How to Define Your Target Market: Check Out Your Competition

Who are your competitors targeting? Who are their current customers? Don’t go after the same market. You may find a niche market that they are overlooking.

Dig Deeper: In Praise of Niche Marketing

How to Define Your Target Market: Analyze Your Product/Service

Write out a list of each feature of your product or service. Next to each feature, list the benefits they provide (and the benefits of those benefits). For example, a graphic designer offers high quality design services. The resulting benefit is a professional company image. A professional image will attract more customers because they see the company as professional and trustworthy. So ultimately, the benefit of high quality design is to gain more customers and make more money.

Once you have your benefits listed, make a list of people who have a need that your benefit fulfills. For example, a graphic designer could choose to target businesses interested in increasing their client base. While this is still too general, you now have a base to start from.

Dig Deeper: How to Conduct Market Research

How to Define Your Target Market: Choose Specific Demographics to Target

Figure out not only who has a need for your product or service, but also who is most likely to buy it. Think about the following factors:

    • Age
    • Location
    • Gender
    • Income level
    • Education level
    • Marital or family status
    • Occupation
    • Ethnic background

Dig Deeper: Why Demographics Are Crucial to Your Business

How to Define Your Target Market: Consider the Psychographics of Your Target

Psychographics are more personal characteristics of a person, including:

    • Personality
    • Attitudes
    • Values
    • Interests/hobbies
    • Lifestyles
    • Behavior

Determine how your product or service will fit into your target’s lifestyle. How and when will they use the product? What features are most appealing to them? What media do they turn to for information? Do they read the newspaper, search online, or attend particular events?

Dig Deeper: Understanding How Your Customers Think

How to Define You Target Market: Evaluate Your Decision

Once you’ve decided on a target market, be sure to consider these questions:

    • Are there enough people that fit my criteria?
    • Will my target really benefit from my product/service? Will they see a need for it?
    • Do I understand what drives my target to make decisions?
    • Can they afford my product/service?
    • Can I reach them with my message? Are they easily accessible?

Don’t break your target down too far! Remember, you can have more than one niche market. Consider if your marketing message should be different for each niche market. If you can reach both niches effectively with the same message, then maybe you have broken down your market too far. Also, if you find that there are only 50 people that fit all of your criteria, maybe you should reevaluate your target. The trick is to find that perfect balance.

You may be asking, “How do I find all this information?” Try searching online for research others have done on your target. Search for magazine articles and blogs that talk about your target market or that talk to your target market. Search for blogs and forums where people in your target market communicate their opinions. Look for survey results, or consider conducting a survey of your own. Ask your current customers for feedback.

Defining your target market is the hard part. Once you know who you are targeting, it is much easier to figure out which media you can use to reach them and what marketing messages will resonate with them. Instead of sending direct mail to everyone in your zipcode, you can send only to those who fit your criteria. Save money and get a better return on investment by defining your target audience.

Dig Deeper: How to Find New Customers and Increase Sales

Source: Inc.com By Mandy Porta

3 Comments

Filed under Business, Competitive Analysis, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Strategy, Niche Market, Place, Price, Product, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research, Research, Target Market, Trends