Tag Archives: Place

Ideas for Fashion Shows

  1. A girl posing on the runway.
    A girl posing on the runway.

    Fashion shows are about more than just the clothes on the models. Fashion shows are about the theatrics of it all, the show itself. When planning a show you need to create a complete concept and use the smaller details to exude your theme and color scheme.

  2. Themes

  3. Choose a theme for your fashion show. If you have a distinct look or theme for the collection being shown, then go with this. If not, choose a color scheme, time period and general mood or feeling you would like your guests to walk away with. Make sure every detail follows your mood, time period and color scheme once you’ve decided on these factors.
  4. Confetti and Fireworks

  5. Shoot off fireworks at the end of the show for an outdoor runway. Let confetti fall from the ceiling or be shot out of confetti guns during the show or at the end for a big finale.
  6. Fundraiser

  7. Make the fashion show into a fundraiser. Charge for admission and then sell the clothes seen on the runway. Donate the proceeds to a church, children’s organization or non-profit, or fund a community service project.
  8. Video Screens

  9. Set up large video screens on each side of the runway. Have the screens show live footage of the runway as the models walk down so everyone can see the fashions, no matter where they might be sitting. Use the screens to show behind-the-scenes footage before the show begins or footage of the designer working on the pieces as the piece comes down the runway on a model.
  10. Decorations

  11. Roll out a carpet for guests to walk down as they arrive. A red carpet is customary, but you can choose any color or design to make it coordinate with the collection being shown. Put plush seat covers on the chairs so your guests are comfortable during the show.

Original Source: eHow By Dialogue Queen , eHow Contributor

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Filed under Ad Campaign, Business, Fashion, Fashion Marketing, Fashion Show, Market Research, Marketing, Marketing Mix, Marketing Strategy, Place, Presentation, Promotion, Target Market

HOW TO: Score the Best Fashion Deals on the Social Web

Mollie Vandor is the Product Manager for Ranker.com and Media Director for Girls in Tech LA. You can find her on Twitter and on herblog, where she writes about the web, the world and what it’s like to be a geek chic chick.

Just because the economy is still depressed doesn’t mean you have to be. In fact, there are plenty of ways to live it up without seeing your bank balance plummet — especially if you know how to use social media to live the good life on tight budget.

Even the most reclusive social media shut-ins need to leave the house for some in-person networking at some point. And when you do, you don’t want to look like the poor slob who just threw on whichever pants were closest to the computer screen. Nor do you want to be the designer diva who can’t afford cab fare because she blew all her bucks on a brand name bag. Fortunately, thanks to a few online tips and tricks, high fashion doesn’t have to come with a high price tag.


Smell the Savings


 

 

 

 

Coco Chanel once said, “A woman who doesn’t wear perfume has no future.” While Coco may have been overstating her case a bit, it’s true that perfume and cologne are great accessories to any outfit. Of course, buying the good stuff can also be a great way to flush a fortune down the drain. That’s why sample sizes should be your new best body-odor-fighting friend.

Don’t let their small size fool you — one of these little bottles will still probably give you a good six months of sweet scents, depending on how heavily you use it. Sample perfumes start as low as $1.99 on AmazonAmazon.com, and because they’re so small, shipping is extremely cheap. If you buy from a bigger retailer like FragranceNet, they’ll also usually throw in other goodies like more perfume or makeup samples.


Personal Stylists Are Out of Style


 

 

 

 

Before you buy any clothes to go with that signature scent, use a site like Polyvore or ShopStyle to be your own personal wardrobe stylist — no hefty retainer required. These sartorial social networks let you “try before you buy” by giving you the tools to put together looks online, so you can see how clothes and accessories will work together.

With huge databases of designer duds, this is a great way to test drive an outfit before you spend cold, hard cash on it, and a great way to keep track of what you already have in your closet. Plus, with everyone posting different looks, these are also great places to get inspiration for new ways to wear the stuff you’ve already shelled out the cash for.


Keep Your Cash


 

 

 

 

When you are ready to make a big clothing or beauty purchase, make sure you use a service like eBates, which gives you a percentage of what you spend on their partner sites back as a cash rebate. So, it’s basically like you’re paying yourself to shop — or at least that’s what you can tell yourself to justify spending so much on shoes.


Sample Sale Sites


 

 

 

 

Of course, you can avoid spending full price on anything by signing up for a private sale site. These sites are the online equivalent of a sample sale, giving you exclusive access to amazing deals on designer looks. And, many of them will even e-mail you when a sale matching your particular preferences pops up.

With so many sale sites to choose from, it can sometimes be difficult to decide which ones are worth opening your inbox too. If you’re looking for basics like great jeans or tees, then BlueFly is probably your best bet. This mainstream online shopping mall also has a fantastic private sale area, where anyone can browse big discounts on designer duds from brands like Theory, Prada and Louboutin. You don’t even have to sign up to use it, although registered users can ask to be notified about new deals via e-mail.

If you’re into the higher end of high fashion, then Gilt GroupeNet-A-Porter and Haute Look are all great bets for big name brands. Gilt Man gives guys the same exclusive deals on a site built just for them. Gilt Groupe even has an iPhone/iPad/Android app to let you shop sales on the go. Net-A-Porter lets you do the same from your iPhone/iPad.

For more unique, up-and-coming designers, head to Rue La La, which has a slightly younger aesthetic and a lot of fun, playful finds. If you’ve got little ones to outfit too, use Zulily. They’ve got great clothes and accessories for kids, and a few things for mom too.


Vintage: Everything Old is New Again


 

 

 

 

If brand new brands aren’t your bag, the web is also a great place to track down fabulous vintage finds, which often cost far less than their shiny new counterparts. In the dark ages before the InternetInternet, finding that amazing designer piece of vintage clothing was like searching for the proverbial needle in a big, messy thrift store haystack. But now, there are some great options for perusing the previously worn racks from the comfort of your computer screen.

EtsyRusty ZipperArchive Vintage and Posh Girl Vintage are just a few of the places where you can score hot looks with a little bit of history behind them. CMadeleines has a great listing of vintage duds by designers, including pieces by Chanel, Dior and Hermes. And, TheFrock has fantastic vintage dresses, including a great bridal boutique.

Speaking of brides, if you’re looking to accessorize all of those fabulous outfits you just bought online, you can score great jewelry deals — including deeply discounted bridal bling — at I Do, Now I Don’t. This site specializes in the sale of jewels by scorned exes who want to unload them fast for much less than what they were purchased for in the first place. You can bid on necklaces, bracelets, rings and more, or buy them outright. Just try to avoid reading the stories about why the items are being sold, unless you want to spend a whole lot more in retail therapy to get your mood back up.


Why Buy When You Can Rent?


 

 

 

 

If you just need a single look for a particular event, or you want to get all the benefits of a brand name buy without all that pesky commitment and cold, hard cash, then you want a runway rental service. These sites offer what A-list celebrities have been privy to for years; borrowing. Designer duds and amazing accessories can be rented for far less than you’d pay to actually own them.

It’s sort of like Netflix for your closet. Bag, Borrow or Steal and From Bags to Riches offer amazing purses and accessories, and Rent the Runway has clothing options guaranteed to get even the most finicky fashionista frothing at the mouth — or the keyboard, as the case may be.


Fashion Goes Social


 

 

 

 

Even if you’re not necessarily an online shopper — or renter — you can still get great gear at low prices using the web. You can follow brands like Louis Vuitton on FoursquareFoursquare and Toms Shoes on GowallaGowalla for insider info, good deals and the chance to win great stuff.

Or you can use Stylophane to quickly find your favorite fashion brands on FacebookFacebook. If you want to find coupons you can use in the real world, CheapTweet will let quickly scan everyone who is sharing a fashion or beauty sale on TwitterTwitter in real time, so you know which coupons to print out and which ones to pass on. You can also send a tweet to @couponbot with the name of your favorite store, and see what deals come back.

Of course, you should also make sure you accessorize your favorite mobile device with an app like ShopSavvy, which lets you scan bar codes of stuff you’re thinking about buying to see if there’s a better price elsewhere. Because if you’re paying the bill for a decent smartphone data plan, you definitely can’t afford to pay full price for fashion when there’s a sale going on somewhere else.

No matter what your style, saving money is always in. Especially with the recession turning penny-pinching into the hottest trend for fall. But thanks to the Internet, you can be on top of that trend – and many more – without a lot of extra effort or energy. Because saving money on style is great. But saving money on style while sitting at home in your pajama pants is even better.

Original Source: Mashable.com

 

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Linkedin and learning from Alumni Networking

Linkedin, the social networking site that lets you connect into groups sharing common interests, provides a powerful way to use alumni networking to learn how to do business better, as well as to make contacts that might lead to jobs and internships.  Join a group or association by creating a profile.  Next, go to your profile and select theGroups link at the top of the page and then the Groups Directory link to view groups you may benefit from joining.  This page provides a drop down box from which you can select an alumni, corporate, conference, networking, non-profit, or professional group.  Once you’ve selected a group, choose (or not) to display the group logo on your pages, get a digest of emails and/or activity from the group, allow members of the group to send you messages, and select the frequency of your received messages.

The value of using an alumni group such as the Bryant University Alumni Association is the ability to draw on the working experiences of business professionals.  Students learning in the classroom can supplement this learning by reading the threads posted by practitioners on Linkedin.  For example, today I’m reading a discussion on 5 Reasons Why Small Business Needs Marketing, a great thread giving me insight into how small businesses are using other social networking tools effectively to market their business.

Original Source: Krupplibrary

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Online Selling Start-Up Guidelines

Thinking about starting an online business? With the rise in e-commerce today, it is but natural for individuals and organizations to go with the flow and start selling online. Some people have always wanted to but never got around to setting up their businesses because of factors such as a lack of e-commerce knowledge while some just got too scared to make the move.

While there are risks involved in starting an online business, it is comparatively lower than that of a “physical” store. With an online business, you will not have to worry about putting up a structure- an office, a store, etc. Inventory can be kept at home. Another thing is, with an online store you will not need hire someone to handle customer service stuff. You can do this all by yourself, unless the business has expanded already. Additionally, with an online business, you will make your products and services available 24/7, all year round. You also get the benefit of work flexibility, meaning you can work from home, from your hotel room, from the bathroom even! The list of advantages is really long but these are the major ones.

To get started, here are the simple things you need to understand.

• Know your niche. It is important to be sure of what products you will be selling and which market to tap. Although the internet is a hub of different kinds of buyers, you may want to make your target clear.

• Get a domain name. When you choose a domain name, make sure it is understandable, short and simple. Make sure it highlights the can of business you are selling and do not make it sound ambiguous.

• Get a website. Make sure the layout looks professional. Your website is a representative of your business so if it looks bad, it will affect customers’ impression and will likely push them away.

• Sign up for a merchant account and payment processor. You want to offer payment flexibility to your customers so you should get a merchant account. It would be such a waste to have many customers driven away because your store does not allow card payments.

• Establish social networking. Go out and tell the world of your business. Talk to people. Join social networks and establish connections. You have to let people know who you are. While having a website will allow people to know you, there is still a big market potential somewhere else. Make sure you do what you can to market your product.

Selling online is really a great way to earn money- with low overhead cost and quick returns on investment. Since more and more people are choosing to buy over the internet instead of having to go the mall or department store, you can be sure that you will reap some profits for your business if you do things right. As long as you follow the simple guidelines and really work hard to improve your business, then nothing could go wrong. Good luck

Original Source: ecommerceshoppingcartsoftware

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In-Store Online Shopping

Intel Point-of-Sales kiosk skips sales personnel but not fitting rooms

Online shopping is an almighty gift to the consumer as far as speed and convenience is concerned. With the Intel Point-of-Sale Kiosk that experience just became pretty much foolproof.

The Intel Point-of-Sale Kiosk is basically shopping online inside the actual store of choice. The difference is that now when the item arrives at your door, you know it actually fits. Being that the kiosk is inside the store you can try on anything you like.

While some people don’t care about the risk and will just shop from home, others would find this to be a revolutionary digital way to shop.

Original Source: http://www.trendhunter.com/trends/intel-point-of-sale-kiosk

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DIESEL, LIVE, BREATH AND WEAR PASSION

INTRODUCTION

Have you ever heard of passion in the marketing mix? How about people? Those two Ps never seem to figure alongside the famous four which you, will of course, know by heart. This case study shows that having the depth of passion and the right people are crucial missing links in binding the regular Ps together.

PRODUCT

Diesel sells nice jeans. Close, but no ‘A’. Actually, it’s not that close. The reason Diesel has grown is because it knows it is about a lot more than selling nice jeans. Diesel is a lifestyle: if that lifestyle appeals to you, you might like to buy the products. Renzo describes this as an end of the ‘violence’ towards the customer forcing them to buy and rather an involvement in the lifestyle.

The brandIt might be useful to ask a question – what actually is a brand? The answer could take a variety of routes and go on for pages but a useful way to think of a brand is as a set of promises. Those promises form the basis of the customer’s relationship with that company. In the case of Diesel those promises are very personal, very passionate.

The Diesel brand promises to entertain and to introduce customers to new, experimental experiences. Its product line now goes far beyond premium jeans and includes fragrances, sunglasses and even bike helmets.  These products complement, convey and support the promises of passion and experience made by the Diesel brand.

Being such a crucial element of its work you might imagine the product design team at Diesel to ‘plot’ in something akin to a war room, pushing little squadrons of well-dressed soldiers around with long sticks. Actually, this is where that elemental passion which created Diesel sets them apart from many others. The whole team at Diesel lives the brand. They are all incredibly passionate about their creations. So when it comes to expressing that passion, ideas come naturally. Living and breathing the set of promises the Diesel brand communicates means employees can listen to their instincts, creating products straight from within.

Diesel builds its entire existence around the passion for what it does. With a founder who sees his work as an art and not a science, the company has redefined how a brand sees and communicates with its customers since 1978. It is the Diesel story we will look at in this case study.

Diesel is a global clothing and lifestyle brand. With a history stretching back over 30 years, the company now employs some 2,200 people globally with a turnover of €1.3 billion and its products are available in more than 5,000 outlets. However, this list of numbers is far less interesting than the company, people and founder behind them. Diesel is a remarkable company with a unique mindset. A mindset which puts sales and profit second to building something special, something ‘cool’ and something which can change the world through fashion.

The story begins with a young Renzo Rosso passionate about the clothes he wears but disappointed in the options available to him in his home town Molvena, Italy. Acting on impulse, he decided to use his passion to make the clothes he wanted to wear. Renzo was drawn to the rebellious fabric of the 1960s and rock & roll: denim. It inspired him to create jeans which would allow him and others to express themselves in ways other clothing simply could not.

Proving popular, Renzo made more and more of his handcrafted creations, selling them around Italy from the back of his little van. The still-young Renzo is the proud owner and CEO of Diesel along with that impressive list of figures. That impulse and passion apparently paid off.

PROMOTION

‘Be stupid’With the launch of the recent marketing campaign around the phrase ‘Be Stupid’, Diesel took a look at what brought its current pipeline: it was Renzo Rosso, all those years ago, taking the ‘stupid’ move to make jeans he wanted to wear. Then he took the even more stupid move of trying to sell those jeans to others, believing he might not be the only fool in Molvena! As it turned out, there were quite a few more to be found and Renzo’s ‘stupid’ move ended up creating something which millions of people around the world now enjoy.

Promotion and marketing at Diesel takes a very different route to many other companies. It is always about engaging with the customer as opposed to selling at them: creating an enjoyable two-way dialogue as opposed to a hollow one-way monologue. All elements of Diesel’s promotion aim to engage the customer with the lifestyle. If they like the lifestyle, they might like the products.

For example, the Diesel team saw music as an inseparable part of that lifestyle and realised that exploring new music and new artists was all part of trying something different and experimenting with the unusual. 10 years later, Diesel:U:Music is a global music support collaborative, giving unsigned bands a place where they can be heard and an opportunity to have their talent recognised. It’s not about selling, it’s about giving people something they will enjoy and interact with.

Tied to Diesel:U:Music is an online radio station. It is another example of where Diesel unconventionality has created something which pushes conceptions and the usual ways of doing things. The radio station takes a rather unusual approach of not having a traditional play list but rather gives the choice to the resident DJ. This freedom is reflected in the eccentric mix of music which is played on the station.

Above- and below-the-lineIn promotion and marketing, we often talk about ‘above-the-line’ and ‘below-the-line’ methods of reaching consumers. Above-the-line marketing is aimed at a mass audience through media such as television or radio. Below-the-line marketing takes a more individual, targeted approach using incentives to purchase via various promotions. In this case passion again acts to blur and gel the boundaries between the two approaches. If we had to define this approach in terms of theory, we would call it ‘through-the-line’, i.e. a blend of the two.

The passion and energy embodied by the Diesel lifestyle is communicated through a mix of above-the-line and below-the-line approaches. The balance and composition of that mix is what the Diesel team hands over to their passion and feel for the company and brand. That energy guides the way this abstract theory is realised in projects such as Diesel:U:Music and the ‘Be Stupid’ campaign, which entertain and interact with their potential customers.

PLACE

Another, drier, way of describing ‘place’ in the marketing mix is ‘channel’ or distribution channel. The way a business chooses to offer its products to its customers has a huge impact on its success.

Only around 300 of the 5,000 global outlets which sell Diesel products are owned and managed by the company itself. The majority are large department stores offering many other brands or boutiques with a very specific style of their own. How do you maintain the quality of a product and its communication when dealing with so many different partners and distribution channels?

CultureThe strong culture within Diesel again holds the answer. Every employee is able to communicate the brand appropriately in their given role within the company. As such, the managers of the Diesel-branded stores know that their function is to act as a flagship. They focus on the core campaigns like ‘Be Stupid’ giving a solid focus and image for the brand. Employees in each of the stores all know the campaigns intimately and are very aware of the image they should put across to customers entering the stores.

Their retail partners such as the department stores are a crucial link in the chain. Diesel works closely with these partners to ensure they express the same level of passion when offering their products. This is done through separate and individual campaigns. These provide visitors with a unique experience which again encourages them to get involved with the Diesel lifestyle as opposed to forcing products on them.

DistributionThis approach to distribution can be seen as a mix of exclusive and selective distribution over intensive distribution. Exclusive distribution involves limiting distribution to single outlets such as the Diesel flagship stores. Selective distribution involves using a small number of retail outlets and partners to maintain the quality of presentation and communication to the customer. Intensive distribution, on the other hand, is commonly used to distribute low price or impulse goods such as sweets.

PRICE

The price of a product is so much more than a little, or rather big, number on a tag. The price of a product is the most direct and immediate tool a business can use to convey the quality of its product at the point of sale. If done right, the price reinforces the rest of the marketing, drawing in the target customers by conveying the appropriate quality.

Pricing strategiesDiesel uses a model based on premium pricing. As we have discussed, Diesel is far more a lifestyle than a clothing brand.  Through the vision and passion of Renzo Rosso, the company has created a whole new approach to engaging with its customers. The price of Diesel’s products needs to reflect the substance and value of that experience.

A strategy such as penetration pricing used by businesses making high-volume, relatively low-margin products would be inappropriate as it would undermine the quality association thus devaluing the brand and experience.

We do not pay a premium price for Diesel jeans because they are a premium quality, that is taken for granted. We pay a premium price because the jeans and the brand fit in with and even encourage a premium, dynamic lifestyle built ‘for successful living’, as Diesel would say.

The team at Diesel must be intimately in tune with that lifestyle so they can see how their diverse range of products from jeans to fragrances and even bike helmets fits within that lifestyle. That feel for what Diesel is and how we, the potential customers, interact with it allows the company to price those products in a way which complements and neatly fits into that lifestyle.

PEOPLE

Besides the fact Renzo has, let’s say, done alright for himself, he has inspired thousands of people who proudly work to build the brand through a shared passion and contagious ambition.

Looking at the structure within which all those people work can help us to understand just why they are so happy to be there. Renzo realised people and their ideas form the heart of the company. So that everyone’s voice can be heard and each person working for Diesel has an equal say, the company adopts a flat hierarchy. This means there are very few layers of management and everyone is encouraged to communicate with each other: sharing ideas, solving problems and trying to communicate that energy with people outside the company – the customers.

TeamworkWhen decisions are made in this flat hierarchy they are made as a team. The team as a whole can then track the progress of that idea and monitor the results. Feedback is important because if everything has gone to plan, the achievement has to be acknowledged so that everyone can take pride in what they have done. If something has not gone to plan, group feedback allows an evaluation of why and the ability to learn for the future.

MotivationImportantly, this acknowledgment or learning happens equally across the company so everyone is kept up to speed on the ups and downs of business. This sense of belonging both to a team but also to a particular responsibility is very important for employee motivation. The better you understand your work and your environment, the happier you are likely to be with your job. The happier you are, the less likely you are to want to leave and so this open approach has the very positive company-wide effect of high employee satisfaction and a low staff turnover. Specifically in the fashion industry this means that the people working for Diesel have a stronger sense of identity and a deeper understanding of the brand making them even better at what they do.

CONCLUSION

The marketing mix is all good and well but it doesn’t paint the full picture. To understand it we must look at the ‘touchy, feely’ elements of business which are less often discussed. Diesel has built its existence around that touchy, feely passion with every one of its 2,200 employees living the Diesel brand. Diesel is the perfect company to allow us to see how this dry theory actually works in real life: how the passion of a founder like Renzo Rosso can be communicated around a company and breathed into each and every one of its diverse products.

Diesel grew into a global household name for premium clothing but it all started from that one man wanting to do something unusual, something ‘stupid’. Stubbornly he stuck to his belief in doing the unusual and it has created a global company whose products are enjoyed by millions. More importantly, this has created a lifestyle – a whole new approach to the way we see a brand. Diesel is an experience which interacts with and entertains its customers – a far deeper relationship than most other brands.

Being driven by passion and the desire to do something special naturally ties these elements together. Understanding theory like the marketing mix in a company like Diesel can be difficult if we expect the elements of price, place, product and promotion to be separate from each other. It becomes easier if, like a magic eye picture, we look beyond the dry theory and realise all of these elements are inseparably bound together by the passion of people like Renzo Rosso who have dedicated their lives to treating their work as an artistic expression of their feelings.
Read more: http://www.thetimes100.co.uk/case-study–live-breathe-and-wear-passion–159-414-7.php#ixzz16R3XM1mV

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AIMS OF MARKETING DEPARTMENT

Marketing involves a range of processes concerned with finding out what consumers want, and then providing it for them. This involves four key elements, which are referred to as the 4P’s (the marketing mix). A useful starting point therefore is to carry out market research to find out about customer requirements in relation to the 4Ps.

Market research

There are two main types of market researchQuantitative research involves collecting a lot of information by using techniques such as questionnaires and other forms of survey. Qualitative research involves working with smaller samples of consumers, often asking them to discuss products and services while researchers take notes about what they have to say. The marketing department will usually combine both forms of research.

The marketing department will seek to make sure that the company has a marketing focus in everything that it does. It will work very closely with production to make sure that new and existing product development is tied in closely with the needs and expectations of customers.

Modern market focused organisations will seek to find out what their customers want. For example, financial service organisations will want to find out about what sort of accounts customers want to open and the standard of service they expect to get. Retailers like Argos and Homebase will seek to find out about customer preferences for store layouts and the range of goods on offer. Airlines will find out about the levels of comfort that customers desire and the special treatment that they prefer to receive.

A useful definition of marketing is the anticipation and identification of customer needs and requirements so as to be able to meet them, make a profit or achieve other key organisational objectives.

Source: Thetimes100.uk

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