Tag Archives: Shopping Portal

10 Reasons Your Business Should Have a Custom Facebook Landing Page

If your business is on Facebook, adding a custom landing page can have a big impact on your presence there. A custom landing page can help drive web traffic, add value to your online marketing efforts and increase sales.

If you’re considering the types of benefits a custom landing page can create, this post will help make up your mind.

A custom Facebook landing page can:

1. HIGHLIGHT A CALL TO ACTION.

One of the biggest points about your landing page should be to direct your audience to do something, whether its signing up for your newsletter, downloading a coupon or requesting a free sample. You can use a custom landing page as a way to extend the reach of your lead generating efforts.

2. DRIVE INTEREST IN CURRENT PROMOTIONS, EVENTS AND PRODUCTS.

A landing page can be a great flexible feature area for your web presence. You can generate a buzz around new products there or break news about sales and promotions. Heck, you might even want to test out breaking new information there first to see if it helps grow your network.

3. DO SOMETHING DIFFERENT.

There are several touted best practices for a Facebook landing page, and several companies that are heralded as having some of the best ones out there. Unfortunately, this spurns a lot of copycats. Try to take cues from what you see as a best practice and add your own dose of originality.

4. PERSONALIZE YOUR COMPANY IN AN IMPERSONAL WORLD.

Facebook profiles without customization can be bland and formulaic. A well-designed landing page will help your page stand out in a land of static templates. A thought out landing page can also help you personally connect to your audience and further brand your platform. Be careful not to simply recreate your web design. Remember, your customers are there to get something unique.

5. WELCOME VISITORS TO YOUR PAGE.

On Facebook, new fan pages and groups pop up every day. There can be confusion as to whether or not you are on the “official” page of the brand, celebrity or organization you are searching for. A landing page will lend credibility to your platform and reassure your audience they are in the right place. And it’s a pretty cool welcome mat, too.

6. DETERMINE ROI WITH IFRAMED LANDING PAGE TABS.

We’ve got news for your accounting department — you can now determine whether or not your Facebook page is directly leading to sales. Several socially savvy companies have caught on to this. JCPenny, Delta and Threadless all have shopping carts iFramed into their Facebook pages. Whether you’re booking public storage spaces or selling software, your Facebook page can act as another direct sales channel.

7. HIGHLIGHT SPECIAL OFFERS FOR “LIKING” YOUR PAGE.

Once you actually get someone to your Facebook page, there’s no guarantee you’re going to get them to actually click that “Like” button. Use a landing page to give them that incentive. Think about special discounts, coupons or other rewards you can give to your network to thank them for their loyalty.

8. DRAW ATTENTION TO YOUR “LIKE” BUTTON.

Let me peface this by saying that I’ve never had a problem locating a “Like” button on a business page. However, there are still valid reasons to embed them in a landing page. Mobile devices, like smart phones and tablets, are quickly evolving into the primary tools people use to access the Internet. It’s now much more difficult to gauge what will appear above and below the fold. Strategically embedding a “Like” button in another spot may make it more likely a visitor will follow your call to action. But don’t go overboard.

9. SHOWCASE YOUR CREATIVITY OR HUMOR WITH UNIQUE CONTENT.

A landing page is a place where companies can step outside of their stilted corporate persona and connect with an audience from one human to another. Think of something “off the wall” (Oh, no I didn’t. Yes, I did.) to display the personalities within your organization. Humor is a no brainer. Taco Bell (another company that is mentioned frequently in social media marketing) currently uses its landing page as a Superhero video comic strip. This is the kind of unique value customers are seeking when they become a part of your network.

10. CALL ATTENTION TO YOUR VALUE PROPOSITIONS.

By now, your brand has established its value propositions. Without duplicating your website content, use the landing page as a flexible channel to bring attention to the benefits your company offers. One thing to note when you do this however is to not be overly promotional. Eyes will glaze. Back buttons will be clicked.

Source: Sexysocialmedia.com

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Fashion 2.0: Magazines Capitalise on Shopable Content

Jennifer Aniston by Steven Klein | Source: W MagazineJennifer Aniston by Steven Klein | Source: W Magazine

In recent seasons, fashion brands have learnt to think like publishers, creating original digital content to earn attention and attract fans who will carry their message across the internet. But the reverse is also true: squeezed by shrinking advertising budgets, traditional content creators like magazines are learning to think like retailers, embracing e-commerce to open new revenue streams and monetise their content.

Click here to find out more!“Publishers are the number one generators of purchasing intent for brands every day, but are being allocated an ever shrinking amount of ad dollars,” said Philippe von Borries, co-founder and publisher of popular fashion website Refinery29.com.

Indeed, “intent generators” like magazines are losing their fair share of sales revenue to “intent harvesters” like shopping sites at the end of the purchasing process, observes internet entrepreneur Chris Dixon in an insightful blog post entitled “A Massive Misallocation of Online Advertising Dollars.”

Mr. Dixon suggests that better techniques for tracking how publishers generate purchase intent could lead to a more favorable allocation of advertising dollars, allowing content sites to focus purely on producing content. But many magazines are hedging their bets, becoming both “intent generators” and “intent harvesters” by launching their own online shops and integrating them into their editorial platforms.

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SHOPPING CHANNELS

Time Inc’s key fashion title InStyle first launched InStyle Shopping back in 2007, letting consumers browse and buy an edited array of products from retailers like Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Bergdorf Goodman, and earning the magazine a share of the sales revenue. According to Simeen Mohsen, InStyle’s director of digital business operations, InStyle Shopping has “moved more than $10 million in product since launch.”

While InStyle declined to quantify exactly what this number means in terms of revenue for the magazine, other online publications and blogs earn 8 to 12 percent on clicks that lead to successful sales via affiliate programmes. Even if InStyle only earned about half as much  — say 5 percent — this would translate to $500 thousand in revenue since 2007.

The Business of Fashion

But ShopStyle, the social shopping engine that has powered InStyle Shopping since launch, states on their website: “The rate you are paid per click depends on a number of factors, including how often clicks result in sales for the retailer, the amount of each sale, and whether those products are returned for a refund. As a result, the rate you are paid can vary over time.”

Building on the success of InStyle Shopping, Time Inc. recently made a strategic move to deepen the integration of e-commerce across InStyle.com. In January, the publisher acquired StyleFeeder, a personal shopping engine that uses pattern recognition technology to make product recommendations. StyleFeeder is expected to be woven throughout InStyle’s website and replace the current partnership with ShopStyle. Speaking to the Wall Street Journal, Fran Hauser, head of digital strategy for the group that manages InStyle, explained: “Our editors are generating significant consumer demand for products in the retail market. And what StyleFeeder allows us to do is share in that value creation.”

Vogue iPad App Contents Vogue Brings Out Its First iPad App

InStyle isn’t the only magazine that’s been integrating e-commerce into its offering. Last November, Condé Nast’s Lucky magazine added online shopping to its editorial platform, bringing intent generation and intent harvesting together in one destination. “We felt strongly that we wanted to weave the eboutique into Luckymag.com rather than create a separate ecommerce site,” said Mary Gail Pezzimenti, Lucky magazine’s web director. “We believe that women want to shop alongside great fashion how-to advice, styling videos, fashion news and galleries of great outfits or hairstyles.”

Independent fashion titles have also been experimenting with e-commerce. Last Autumn, AnOther Magazine launched AnOther Shop, an online boutique with specially commissioned merchandise, from artworks by Jake and Dinos Chapman to laptop cases by Gareth Pugh. Then, a couple of months later, AnOther Magazine launched AnOther Loves, a product recommendation engine that sits alongside, but separate from AnOther Shop. It’s a bit like a collective blog, with product picks crowdsourced from a carefully selected list of contributors. “We wanted to turn this collection of desirable goods into a collaborative stream, and with a little semantics have realised this could be very useful for recommendations,” said Alistair Allan, digital director at Dazed Group which publishes AnOther.

CURATED COMMERCE

Magazine brands are also positioning themselves to generate and harvest purchase intent beyond their websites. During London Fashion Week in February, AnOther Loves teamed up with London department store Liberty on an initiative called AnOther Loves Liberty, a curated selection of Liberty products that appeared on AnOther Loves, as well as on Liberty’s website and at their Tudor-style flagship.

Partnerships with sample sale sites have also been popular. Lucky has teamed up with Net-a-Porter’s online outlet, theOutnet.com, to host flash sales curated by Lucky editors, Hachette Filipacchi’s Elle magazine has a deal with Rue La La and Vogue is partnering with Gilt Groupe to let consumers shop select products from the current issue.

SHOPABLE ADVERTISING

A few weeks ago, Vogue also launched an iPhone app designed to make the magazine’s advertising shopable. Called Vogue Stylist, the app is loaded with styling advice and monthly trends supplied by Vogue editors, alongside products advertised in the magazine, which consumers can browse, mix and match with items uploaded from their own closet, and ultimately click to buy. “Vogue Stylist pairs a user’s wardrobe with products from Vogue advertisers to produce a look that is both chic and new,” said Holly Tedesco, integrated marketing director at Vogue. Using the camera built into the iPhone, the app even allows readers to scan and shop physical ad pages in Vogue’s print issue.

FULL INTEGRATION

But some magazines are going beyond branded shopping channels, curated e-commerce partnerships and shopable advertising. They are integrating e-commerce directly into their center-of-book editorial. This month, W magazine launched a shopping guide alongside images of covergirl Jennifer Aniston, with numbered bullets — and links to external shopping sites — that correspond to the clothing Ms. Aniston wears. Indeed, the integrated shopping guides appear in all of W’s fashion spreads for April.

If this kind of deep integration of commerce and core editorial content appears to pose an inherent conflict of interest, it’s worth remembering that at fashion magazines, these lines have long been blurred. Across the industry, the products featured in editorial are often a function of a magazine’s advertisers.

Furthermore, in the real lives of fashion consumers, magazines and shopping are already integrated. People have used magazines as inspirational product guides since their very inception, a behaviour that’s even easier now that editorial sites and online shops are just a click or tab away from each other. So why shouldn’t publishers offer shopping services that streamline the process for consumers and capture a share of the sales revenue that’s rightfully theirs?

That’s not to say that an independent stylistic point of view is not important. It’s tremendously important. It’s what attracts readers in the first place. Going forward, the most successful magazines will be those who are able to maintain their unique point of view, while capitalising on content that’s shopable. A contradiction? Not necessarily. A challenge? Definitely.

“Over the next few months we will be launching several new commerce products,” said von Borries of Refinery29. “We firmly believe that commerce should be an integral element of a digital content site that features new fashion products, trends and designers every hour. Commerce and community also belong together. Whoever does not embrace the two will lose out in the long run.”

Indeed, people love to shop, but even more than that, they love to shop together. While forward-thinking youth apparel brands like Vans have experimented with realtime social shopping, letting users share the experience of customising shoes, we’ve yet to see a content site that lets readers explore and shop fashion together, in realtime.

Source: Businessoffashion.com by Vikram Alexei Kansara is Managing Editor of The Business of Fashion

 

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Google Boutiques.com, a World of Fashion

Google unveils a new shopping portal, Boutiques.com. It showcases the power of search in the world of fashion. You can shop and choose from a variety of styles, designs and collections of famous designers and stylists. Shoppers can easily catch up with the trend because it allows users to save likes or dislikes in the site.

Shopping is the watchword today. Almost everyone around the globe is on a Shopping spree. Google understands this and thus, has launched a new shopping portal entitled Boutiques.com to add on to its almost full kitty of world class products and services. The portal, as they say, combines the goodness of both social and search. It allows for finding and discovering styles and fashions collections that have been put together by renowned celebrities, designers, stylists and fashion experts, to name a few.

Through this site, Google will be able to analyze the tastes of consumers by ways of a number of clicks, Google Trend data, computer vision and machine learning technology and ultimately, letting them know the entire world of fashion. As is the case with Youtube,  whenever a user logs into his/her account, the site would know the user’s taste for fashion and recommend those results that suit the taste.

Google got the technology from its acquisition of Like.com, along with which came the technology team behind it. They were already working hard on that and had also launched a site of their own called WhatToWear.com. The team at Google now consists of PhDs in Computer Science and Fashion Designers and Stylists. In fact, it is an amalgamation of computer nerds and fashion nerds. Altogether, the team is working on creating a new route to browse, find and buy world class fashion under one roof.

Source: Marketingconversation.com by ROBIN PANGILINAN

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