Tag Archives: Sponsorship

Fashion 2.0: Magazines Capitalise on Shopable Content

Jennifer Aniston by Steven Klein | Source: W MagazineJennifer Aniston by Steven Klein | Source: W Magazine

In recent seasons, fashion brands have learnt to think like publishers, creating original digital content to earn attention and attract fans who will carry their message across the internet. But the reverse is also true: squeezed by shrinking advertising budgets, traditional content creators like magazines are learning to think like retailers, embracing e-commerce to open new revenue streams and monetise their content.

Click here to find out more!“Publishers are the number one generators of purchasing intent for brands every day, but are being allocated an ever shrinking amount of ad dollars,” said Philippe von Borries, co-founder and publisher of popular fashion website Refinery29.com.

Indeed, “intent generators” like magazines are losing their fair share of sales revenue to “intent harvesters” like shopping sites at the end of the purchasing process, observes internet entrepreneur Chris Dixon in an insightful blog post entitled “A Massive Misallocation of Online Advertising Dollars.”

Mr. Dixon suggests that better techniques for tracking how publishers generate purchase intent could lead to a more favorable allocation of advertising dollars, allowing content sites to focus purely on producing content. But many magazines are hedging their bets, becoming both “intent generators” and “intent harvesters” by launching their own online shops and integrating them into their editorial platforms.

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SHOPPING CHANNELS

Time Inc’s key fashion title InStyle first launched InStyle Shopping back in 2007, letting consumers browse and buy an edited array of products from retailers like Neiman Marcus, Nordstrom, and Bergdorf Goodman, and earning the magazine a share of the sales revenue. According to Simeen Mohsen, InStyle’s director of digital business operations, InStyle Shopping has “moved more than $10 million in product since launch.”

While InStyle declined to quantify exactly what this number means in terms of revenue for the magazine, other online publications and blogs earn 8 to 12 percent on clicks that lead to successful sales via affiliate programmes. Even if InStyle only earned about half as much  — say 5 percent — this would translate to $500 thousand in revenue since 2007.

The Business of Fashion

But ShopStyle, the social shopping engine that has powered InStyle Shopping since launch, states on their website: “The rate you are paid per click depends on a number of factors, including how often clicks result in sales for the retailer, the amount of each sale, and whether those products are returned for a refund. As a result, the rate you are paid can vary over time.”

Building on the success of InStyle Shopping, Time Inc. recently made a strategic move to deepen the integration of e-commerce across InStyle.com. In January, the publisher acquired StyleFeeder, a personal shopping engine that uses pattern recognition technology to make product recommendations. StyleFeeder is expected to be woven throughout InStyle’s website and replace the current partnership with ShopStyle. Speaking to the Wall Street Journal, Fran Hauser, head of digital strategy for the group that manages InStyle, explained: “Our editors are generating significant consumer demand for products in the retail market. And what StyleFeeder allows us to do is share in that value creation.”

Vogue iPad App Contents Vogue Brings Out Its First iPad App

InStyle isn’t the only magazine that’s been integrating e-commerce into its offering. Last November, Condé Nast’s Lucky magazine added online shopping to its editorial platform, bringing intent generation and intent harvesting together in one destination. “We felt strongly that we wanted to weave the eboutique into Luckymag.com rather than create a separate ecommerce site,” said Mary Gail Pezzimenti, Lucky magazine’s web director. “We believe that women want to shop alongside great fashion how-to advice, styling videos, fashion news and galleries of great outfits or hairstyles.”

Independent fashion titles have also been experimenting with e-commerce. Last Autumn, AnOther Magazine launched AnOther Shop, an online boutique with specially commissioned merchandise, from artworks by Jake and Dinos Chapman to laptop cases by Gareth Pugh. Then, a couple of months later, AnOther Magazine launched AnOther Loves, a product recommendation engine that sits alongside, but separate from AnOther Shop. It’s a bit like a collective blog, with product picks crowdsourced from a carefully selected list of contributors. “We wanted to turn this collection of desirable goods into a collaborative stream, and with a little semantics have realised this could be very useful for recommendations,” said Alistair Allan, digital director at Dazed Group which publishes AnOther.

CURATED COMMERCE

Magazine brands are also positioning themselves to generate and harvest purchase intent beyond their websites. During London Fashion Week in February, AnOther Loves teamed up with London department store Liberty on an initiative called AnOther Loves Liberty, a curated selection of Liberty products that appeared on AnOther Loves, as well as on Liberty’s website and at their Tudor-style flagship.

Partnerships with sample sale sites have also been popular. Lucky has teamed up with Net-a-Porter’s online outlet, theOutnet.com, to host flash sales curated by Lucky editors, Hachette Filipacchi’s Elle magazine has a deal with Rue La La and Vogue is partnering with Gilt Groupe to let consumers shop select products from the current issue.

SHOPABLE ADVERTISING

A few weeks ago, Vogue also launched an iPhone app designed to make the magazine’s advertising shopable. Called Vogue Stylist, the app is loaded with styling advice and monthly trends supplied by Vogue editors, alongside products advertised in the magazine, which consumers can browse, mix and match with items uploaded from their own closet, and ultimately click to buy. “Vogue Stylist pairs a user’s wardrobe with products from Vogue advertisers to produce a look that is both chic and new,” said Holly Tedesco, integrated marketing director at Vogue. Using the camera built into the iPhone, the app even allows readers to scan and shop physical ad pages in Vogue’s print issue.

FULL INTEGRATION

But some magazines are going beyond branded shopping channels, curated e-commerce partnerships and shopable advertising. They are integrating e-commerce directly into their center-of-book editorial. This month, W magazine launched a shopping guide alongside images of covergirl Jennifer Aniston, with numbered bullets — and links to external shopping sites — that correspond to the clothing Ms. Aniston wears. Indeed, the integrated shopping guides appear in all of W’s fashion spreads for April.

If this kind of deep integration of commerce and core editorial content appears to pose an inherent conflict of interest, it’s worth remembering that at fashion magazines, these lines have long been blurred. Across the industry, the products featured in editorial are often a function of a magazine’s advertisers.

Furthermore, in the real lives of fashion consumers, magazines and shopping are already integrated. People have used magazines as inspirational product guides since their very inception, a behaviour that’s even easier now that editorial sites and online shops are just a click or tab away from each other. So why shouldn’t publishers offer shopping services that streamline the process for consumers and capture a share of the sales revenue that’s rightfully theirs?

That’s not to say that an independent stylistic point of view is not important. It’s tremendously important. It’s what attracts readers in the first place. Going forward, the most successful magazines will be those who are able to maintain their unique point of view, while capitalising on content that’s shopable. A contradiction? Not necessarily. A challenge? Definitely.

“Over the next few months we will be launching several new commerce products,” said von Borries of Refinery29. “We firmly believe that commerce should be an integral element of a digital content site that features new fashion products, trends and designers every hour. Commerce and community also belong together. Whoever does not embrace the two will lose out in the long run.”

Indeed, people love to shop, but even more than that, they love to shop together. While forward-thinking youth apparel brands like Vans have experimented with realtime social shopping, letting users share the experience of customising shoes, we’ve yet to see a content site that lets readers explore and shop fashion together, in realtime.

Source: Businessoffashion.com by Vikram Alexei Kansara is Managing Editor of The Business of Fashion

 

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Alternative Hair Show 2011

Preview of Lady Gaga in 2011)

In what could have been considered a 2011 Monster Ball Tour preview, the Alternative Hair Show showed off a number of Lady Gaga inspired looks during a runway show held at the Grand Temple, Freemason’s Hall in central London Sunday. In addition to the outrageous hair creations, the models also sported matching Gaga-esque flamboyantly bombastic outfits that featured lots of leotards and a wide array of crazily impractical accouterments:

Models display creations during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: FASHION)

For LG fashion addicts these last few weeks have been a bit uneventful, so in an effort to sill that void I offer up a collection of fantastically fun fashion photos from the Alternative Hair Show!

A model displays a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: FASHION IMAGES OF THE DAY)

A model presents a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London, October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY ENTERTAINMENT)

A model displays a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: FASHION)

A model displays a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: FASHION)

A model displays a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: FASHION)

A model presents a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London, October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: ODDLY SOCIETY)

A model displays a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: FASHION)

A model presents a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London, October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: ODDLY SOCIETY)

A model presents a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London, October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: SOCIETY ODDLY)

A model presents a creation during the Alternative Hair Show at the Grand Temple, Freemason's Hall in central London, October 17, 2010. REUTERS/Andrew Winning (BRITAIN - Tags: ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY)

Photos: REUTERS/Andrew Winning

Source: Starcasm.net

 

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Affinage proudly sponsored The Alternative Hair Show 2010 

In its 28th year, the Alternative Hair Show is recognised as the worlds most prestigious annual hairdressing event, hosting leading show teams and inspirational hair artists from all over the globe.

Affinage is a proud sponsor of the 2010 event, which this year moves to the beautiful and mysterious Masonic Temple in the Freemasons’ Hall in London’s Covent Garden.

This years show brings a dazzling showcase of mystery and inspiration as the artistic show teams translate the theme: Masquerade.

The venue is the perfect facade for Masquerade and will create an exciting, intimate atmosphere as well as allowing the audience to see every detail of the hair, make up, costume and performance.

GALA DINNER CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF LEUKAEMIA & LYMPHOMA RESEARCH

Guests attending the late show had the exclusive opportunity to book tickets for the 3-course Gala Dinner prior to the late show. This was held at 6pm in the beautiful Connaught Rooms, adjacent to the Freemasons Hall.

Gala dinner tickets for 2011 can be booked through www.alternativehair.org

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    Choosing the Best Internet Marketing Tactics

    With so many new Internet marketing tactics appearing regularly, options in online marketing can seem endless. That can be problematic when running an Internet marketing campaign with limited resources, because there isn’t time to dabble in everything. Instead, the best Internet marketing tactics have to be chosen, which will provide the best return on investment (ROI).

    Internet marketing is a very general term, which encompasses many types of niche marketing, all which can be used effectively online. The following are examples of types of Internet marketing:

    1. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) – Natural Search Engine Rankings through link-building, keyword density, and more.
    2. Search Engine Marketing (SEM) – A specialty form of online advertising, where ads are purchased on search engine results pages (SERPs) for certain keywords.

    3. Email Marketing – Sending ezines, newsletters, or other email correspondence, with a marketing message, special offer, or inciting a certain action.
    4. Online Advertising – Purchasing banner ads, text links, sponsorships, or other forms of paid advertising online.
    5. Online PR – Using press releases, blogs, and other tools to convey company news and build an image online.
    6. Affiliate Marketing – Bringing in third parties to sell for the company, for a share of each sale.
    7. Viral Marketing – Using tools such as viral videos, file sharing, or tell-a-friend links to take advantage of word-of-mouth marketing on the Web.

    To choose the most effective Internet marketing tactics for a website or online business, follow these five steps:

    1. Choose an industry or niche that has a real demand or need to be satisfied.
    2. Identify members of the target market, what their needs are, and how you’ll fill them.
    3. Figure out what has the most influence over members of that target market.
    4. Look at what the competition is doing, and see how you can do it better.
    5. Decide on your Internet marketing budget, and build an Internet marketing plan around it.

    While designing your Internet marketing plan, it can help to list every Internet marketing tactic within your budget that comes to mind, as long as it can reach the target market. That list can then be narrowed down by running each Internet marketing tactic through this checklist to find the best Internet marketing tactics for your needs:

    __ The Internet marketing tactic has the potential to reach the target market.
    __ The Internet marketing tactic has the potential to influence the target market.
    __ This general tactic has been used successfully to reach this target market’s demographic group (in this industry or a complementary one) in the past.
    __ The Internet marketing tactic will help to differentiate the business from competitors.
    __ The Internet marketing tactic can be implemented effectively without exceeding the marketing budget.

    Source: Marketingnova.com

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    Fashion Marketing Techniques

  • Fashion marketing techniques apply many of the same marketing strategies that large and small businesses use. Fashion marketing includes market research, advertising and promotion. Research gathers information about the market for a particular brand or product. Advertising helps generate sales, and promotion increases brand or product awareness. Some fashion marketing techniques include fashion events, print publications, press releases and media relations, digital media and product placement.
  • Events
  • Fashion marketers conduct promotional events. Product launch events invite the media and public or private guests to learn about new product offerings such as jewelry and other accessories. Runway events showcase fashion apparel that is worn by models. Spectators view the models to see how the clothing fits and evaluate the overall look. Other events involve hosting or sponsoring charity events and causes that help build brand awareness.
  • Print Publication
  • Fashion marketers use print publications to promote the brand or product offering. Print publications include the brand’s self-published magazines, trade and consumer magazine advertisement, mailings and newsletters that feature individual products, flyers and posters at store locations, point-of-purchase announcements that are placed at the checkout counter, product inserts that are included with product purchases and billboard ads along highways and city streets.
  • Press Releases
  • Fashion marketers create and distribute press releases. Fashion marketers use press releases to announce the brand’s activities. Releases may introduce a new fashion line or brand, or introduce the brand’s founders. Press releases often keep the public informed about the brand’s activities by announcing new and upcoming product launches, runway events, successes and newsworthy stories about the brand or individual products. Marketers distribute press releases to newspapers and other media outlets, and may use a public relations firm to help reach larger audiences.
  • Digital Media
  • Fashion marketers use digital media for research and promotion. Web technology provides an efficient platform for collecting survey data that reveals information about the brand’s market. For example, some brands that process orders online ask the customer to fill out a satisfaction survey after they complete the purchase. Other Web technology involves social media applications that accomplish outreach and promotional goals. Fashion marketers can keep target markets up-to-date with live status messages, and use profile queries to find new potential customers and distribute e-promos to relevant audiences.
  • Product Placement
  • Fashion marketers, publicists and other promoters use product placement marketing techniques. Product placement techniques involve featuring fashion items and apparel on television programs, movies and celebrities. Product placement displays the product without explicitly advertising it, because this marketing technique displays the product within the context of the primary entertainment. Sometimes, television commercials follow-up on television shows that feature product placement items to increase awareness or credibility.
  • Source: eHow.com By Miguel Cavazos, eHow Contributor

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    Fashion Marketing: How to find a Sponsor for your Fashion Show

    Sponsors love fashion designers. They want to be associated with glamour. Just look at London Fashion Week, sponsored by  the likes of Blackberry, Coutts and British Airways. Or New York Fashion Week, sponsored by Mercedes Benz and others. Sponsorships are a great way to finance your brand’s fashion show.

    How do you get someone to pay you money to be associated with something as intangible as your brand?

    The first time doing this is always the most difficult, but below are some tricks that you can use to drastically increase your chances of being successful in the endeavor.

    Plan your fashion show

    The first step is having a plan that’s as concrete as possible. Know exactly how it will be, what your budgets will be, etc. It is unlikely that you’ll have every detail planned, but do a realistic budget which gives you an idea of how much sponsorship you need to raise.

    This is as much for your own sake as for the sponsor’s sake. It will give you the confidence to go out and know exactly how much you need to ask for.

    Research sponsors

    Now that you have a plan for how to proceed it’s time to find the sponsor. This is where many people give up. Where should you start? A great place to start is to look at who is sponsoring your competitors’ shows. In some cases one company will sponsor a number of shows and you can approach them. This is easiest because they already know how it works and realise the benefits since they already done sponsorships.

    This is not always possible. For a start, companies only have limited sponsorship budgets and they might well be tied up with your competitors already. A clever trick is to approach the competitors of whoever sponsors other fashion labels. For example, if Champagne house X sponsors shows, approach Champagne house Y with a proposal. Even if you have never worked with a sponsor before, you can point to the benefits enjoyed by X as proof that this really works.

    Negotiating with sponsors

    This is the point at which you really have to show that you know what you’re doing. Approach them with a clear proposal and make it as easy as possible for them to write you a cheque. Writing sponsorship proposals is an art in itself

    Figure out what they want and give it to them. What’s important to them? What type of prominence can you give to their brand? Be careful of giving them too much, you don’t want every single photo of your show to be plastered over with the sponsor’s logo. On the other hand the sponsor has to feel like they’re getting their money’s worth for the sponsorship.

    Corporate sponsors love getting free tickets to fashion shows so that their executives can take their partners along to a glamorous evening. They like when there’s going to be a lot of press around. They like it when there are lots of ‘influencers’ who might have a positive impact on their brand. All these things matter. Do a quick breakdown of who will be there.

    Getting the sponsor’s money

    After focusing on what you have to offer them, move on to what you need from them. If you have done a good job of selling the benefits in the above step, this will be much easier and the sponsor will actually want to give you the money.

    To avoid a deadlock it’s a good idea to have a few different scenarios planned. For example, if you pay us £10,000, you’ll get your logo on invitations, logo on a backdrop to the catwalk, etc.

    A great trick is to start with presenting a very expensive option. If this proves to be too much for the sponsor’s budget, you can move on to alternative scenarios for less money and less exposure.

    Following up with your sponsor

    This is a step that fashion labels often neglect after taking sponorship. After the show, you should put together a brief presentation pack with pictures, press coverage of the show and the like. This will allow the person dealing with the sponsorship to justify the expense to his superiors. The better this look the better your chances of getting repeat sponsorship from that sponsor and the easier it becomes to approach new sponsors in the future!

    Tell us about your experiences with sponsors and share your tips in the comments.

    Source: Worldonahanger.com by Emily

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    Marketing Techniques

    marketing strategy is an overall marketing plan designed to meet the needs and requirements of customers. The plan should be based on clear objectives. A number of techniques will then be employed to make sure that the marketing plan is effectively delivered. Marketing techniques are the tools used by the marketing department. The marketing department will set out to identify the most appropriate techniques to employ in order to make profits. These marketing techniques include public relations, trade and consumer promotions, point-of-sale materials, editorial, publicity and sales literature.
    Marketing techniques are employed at three stages of marketing:

    Market research enables the organisation to identify the most appropriate marketing mix. The mix should consist of:

    • the right product
    • sold at the right price
    • in the right place
    • using the most suitable promotional techniques.

    To create the right marketing mix, marketers have to ensure the following:

    • The product has to have the right features – for example, it must look good and work well.
    • The price must be right. Consumers will need to buy in large numbers to produce a healthy profit.
    • The goods must be in ‘the right place at the right time’. Making sure that the goods arrive when and where they are wanted is an important operation.
    • The target group needs to be aware of the existence and availability of the product through promotion. Successful promotion helps a firm to spread costs over a larger output.

    Finally techniques need to be applied to monitor the success of marketing activity. For example when carrying out advertising it is helpful to track consumer awareness of the adverts and their messages. Evaluation can also take the place of other aspects of the marketing mix e.g. which distribution channels were most effective? Was the chosen price the right one? etc.

    Business behaviour: marketing

    Today businesses have an increasing market focus. If organisations are to serve the needs of their customers they need to be structured in such a way as to identify and meet customer requirements.

    Businesses therefore need to behave in such a way that they recognise the needs of the customer.

    A company prospers best when everyone in it believes that success depends on the excellence of his or her contribution. Short-term decisions made many times a day by individuals determine the quality of that day’s work.

    The governing principle should be that everybody has a customer – either outside the company (the traditional ‘customer’) or inside the company (the internal customer). Both kinds of customer expect to be supplied with the product or service they need, on time and as specified.

    The principle holds good for everyone in the company, whatever their level of skill and experience, whether their ‘product’ is answering a telephone in a helpful way or masterminding a major new project. It works to everyone’s benefit. It gives the individual genuine responsibility and scope for initiative and it virtually guarantees that the company’s performance will be improved.

    However, individual behaviours will only match the organisation objective of being customer focused if the right sorts of structures are created. Hence the importance of developing structures such as team working and empowering employees to make decisions rather than be told what to do.

    Modern companies like Travis Perkins (builders merchants), and Argos (catalogue retailer) have recognised the importance of team working in motivating employees and in providing close links to the consumer. By encouraging staff to listen to consumers these organisations are best placed to provide the products and the services that ensure ongoing business success.

    Empowerment is the process of giving increased power and responsibility to employees at all levels within an organisation. It involves placing more trust in them.

    Decentralisation is the process of handing down power from the corporate centre (e.g. Head Office) to the various parts of the organisation.

    Advertising, promotion, packaging and branding

    Advertising, promotion, packaging and branding are important marketing tools which are used to make products and services more desirable and hence increase sales and profits.

    Any form of publicity is advertising. There are two main forms of advertising although in practice the two are inter-related.

    The informational aspect of advertising involves providing information about products, services, or about important issues. For example, the government provides information about the dangers of cigarette smoking, which is an example of informative advertising.

    Persuasive advertising goes further and uses a persuasive message, for example by:

    • showing a famous personality (e.g. Gary Lineker) using the product
    • comparing the advantages of one product with another
    • using sex appeal.

    There are a number of processes involved in producing effective advertising, including:

    • identifying the most appropriate market segments to target the advertising
    • choosing the best possible media, e.g. television, radio, posters etc
    • projecting the right message in the adverts
    • getting the timing of the advertisements right
    • tracking the effectiveness of the advertising, e.g. checking to see how many people can recall the advert and its message.

    Advertising is just one way of promoting a product. Promotion is the business of communicating with customers. There are a number of ways of promoting products and services, including:

    • in-store promotion e.g. giving away free samples in a supermarket
    • publicity in the media, competitions, and sponsorship
    • PR – public relations activities – i.e. presenting the public image of a company to a wide audience
    • presenting products in attractive packaging
    • creating an attractive brand for a product.

    Sponsorship

    Packaging typically refers to the material in which a product is packed – or more specifically, the surface design on the material. However, a wider definition includes all the various aspects of presenting a product – e.g. the shape size and appearance of the packaging, colour and design, the convenience of using the packaging etc.

    A brand is a product with a unique, consistent and well recognised character. The branding of the product therefore involves projecting and developing this character. The uniqueness can come either from an actual product or from its image – usually created by its manufacturer through advertising and packaging. The consistency comes mainly from the consistence of its quality and performance, but it also reflects the consistency of the advertising and packaging. A brand is well-recognised because it has been around for a long time. It takes years to develop a brand.

    Shell has spent over a hundred years developing its brand image through the well known Shell pecten. Audi is associated with its easily recognised four rings logo. McDonald’s is associated with its twin arches. Sponsorship is an important way of promoting the name of an organisation. Many sports and arts organisations rely on support from sponsors. For example Vodafone is a major sponsor of Manchester United Football Club, and Bic sponsored Martin Johnson the England World Cup rugby captain.

    In return for sponsorship of a sports club or arts event the name of the sponsor will be mentioned prominently on advertising hordings, publicity materials, programmes and other literature associated with the club or event.

    The term ‘above-the-line’ advertising and promotion refers to media such as TV, radio and press, for which commission is paid to an advertising agency. ‘Below-the-line’ comprises all media and promotional techniques for which fees are paid in preference to commissions – these might include exhibitions, sales literature and direct mail.

    Read more: http://www.thetimes100.co.uk/theory/theory–marketing-techniques–186.php#ixzz16QqdLYpL

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