Tag Archives: Trends 2011

All About Fashion (Part 2) – Types of Fashion, Income in Fashion, Fashion Schools and more about Fashion

Types of fashion

The garments produced by clothing manufacturers fall into three main categories, although these may be split up into additional, more specific categories:

Vlada Roslyakova A model walks down the runway during the Christian Dior Haute Couture fashion show for A/W 2009/10 on July 6, 2009 in Paris, France.

Haute couture

Until the 1950s, fashion clothing was predominately designed and manufactured on a made-to-measure or haute couture basis (French for high-fashion), with each garment being created for a specific client. A couture garment is made to order for an individual customer, and is usually made from high-quality, expensive fabric, sewn with extreme attention to detail and finish, often using time-consuming, hand-executed techniques. Look and fit take priority over the cost of materials and the time it takes to make.

Ready-to-wear

Ready-to-wear clothes are a cross between haute couture and mass market. They are not made for individual customers, but great care is taken in the choice and cut of the fabric. Clothes are made in small quantities to guarantee exclusivity, so they are rather expensive. Ready-to-wear collections are usually presented by fashion houses each season during a period known as Fashion Week. This takes place on a city-wide basis and occurs twice a year.

Mass market

Currently the fashion industry relies more on mass market sales. The mass market caters for a wide range of customers, producing ready-to-wear clothes in large quantities and standard sizes. Inexpensive materials, creatively used, produce affordable fashion. Mass market designers generally adapt the trends set by the famous names in fashion. They often wait around a season to make sure a style is going to catch on before producing their own versions of the original look. In order to save money and time, they use cheaper fabrics and simpler production techniques which can easily be done by machine. The end product can therefore be sold much more cheaply.

There is a type of design called “kutch” design originated from the German word “kitschig” meaning “ugly” or “not aesthetically pleasing.” Kitsch can also refer to “wearing or displaying something that is therefore no longer in fashion.” Often, high-waisted trousers, associated with the 1980s, are considered a “kitsch” fashion statement.

Income

Median annual wages for salaried fashion designers were $61,160 in May 2008. The middle 50 percent earned between $42,150 and $87,120. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $32,150, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $124,780.. Median annual earnings were $52,860 (£28,340) in apparel, piece goods, and notions – the industry employing the largest numbers of fashion designers.

Fashion education

There are a number of well known art schools and design schools world wide that offer degrees in fashion design and fashion design technology. Some colleges also offer Masters of Fashion courses. Though it is not a requirement to have a Masters level, it is recommended by those already working in the industry to study at this level. The most notable of design schools in Europe include London College of FashionCentral Saint Martins College of Art and DesignUniversity of Westminster and Kingston University in LondonLimerick School of Art and Design and the National College of Art and Designin Ireland, Edinburgh College of Art in ScotlandIstituto MarangoniDomus AcademyPolitecnico of MilanNABA – Nuova Accademia di Belle Arti MilanoIstituto Europeo di DesignUniversity Iuav of Venice in Italy, the Fashion Federation PARIS] European Fashion Accreditationwww.Fashion-Board.com, Antwerp Fashion Academy in Belgium. There is Parsons The New School for DesignCreative Business HouseFashion Institute of Technology and the Pratt Institute in New York City. Elsewhere in the United States there is the Savannah College of Art and DesignVirginia Commonwealth UniversityFashion Institute of Design & Merchandising in Los AngelesSchool of the Art Institute of Chicago and Columbia College Chicago in Chicago. The National Institute of Fashion Technology in India, Shih Chien University in Hong Kong, RMIT University in Melbourne, Fu Jen Catholic University in Taiwan and the Asian University chain, Raffles College of Design and Commerce, all have reputable fashion design courses.

The only Ivy League University having a Fashion Design undergraduate program is Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. The program is offered by the department of Fiber Science & Apparel Design]. Cornell University also offers the only Ph.D. program in apparel design in the United States. The program is intended to address the needs of academia, industry and research by considering apparel design as an applied science that embraces design, technology, physical sciences, the humanities and social sciences in order to meet the human needs for clothing. There are many universities that offer fashion design throughout the United States. The major incorporating fashion design may have alternative names like Apparel and Textiles or Apparel and Textile Design and may be housed in departments such as Art and Art History or Family and Consumer Studies.

READ ALSO:

ALL ABOUT FASHION (PART 1) – FASHION DESIGN, STRUCTURE, HISTORY

ALL ABOUT FASHION (PART 2) – FASHION STAR SYSTEMS, WORLD FASHION AND THE GLOBAL FASHION INDUSTRY

Source: Wikipedia.com

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Creating a Green Fashion Label

When consumers shop for groceries, they tend to review the nutrition label and ingredients list on the food package to obtain dietary information. This food label system helps people make an informed decision and lead healthier lifestyles. Shouldn’t consumers have resources for making similar choices when shopping for apparel products? According to the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (TFPIA), all apparel products should have a label that includes: fiber content, country of origin, manufacturer identification, and care instructions.

 

However, the clothing label may not be informative enough to educate consumers regarding what processes were used to make the product and what environmental impacts those processes may have. One of the common myths consumers may believe regarding apparel products is that natural fiber products are more environmentally friendly than synthetic fiber products. Considering the fact that the textile and apparel industry is a major contributor to environmental degradation, it is important to provide more informative, easy-to-read labels for apparel products, responding to consumers’ growing concerns about environmental issues related to their consumable products.

From interviews with five apparel design personnel in two companies (although these opinions cannot represent all designers’ and merchandisers’ opinions), our research team found that they were aware of the environmental problems associated with dyeing and textile processing. However, interestingly, they did not regard themselves as responsible for correcting these problems.

They also indicated that the biggest determining factor for apparel designers and merchandisers when deciding where to obtain materials for production is the availability of materials from suppliers who have had a long–term relationship with the company. It seems that environmentally friendly materials were not their main concern. They added that if they were sure that their target consumers would be willing to purchase environmentally friendly products, they would practice sustainability. Without certainty, they did not want to take the risk because using green materials costs more. The industry personnel felt that there was nothing they could do as designers or merchandisers to address environmental issues, believing that environmentally friendly production was beyond their ability.

Do consumers agree with these opinions? To explore consumer opinions about green apparel products and purchasing behaviors, a serious of focus group discussions were conducted with 32 consumers. Although organic fibers and other green apparel options are already available in the market, participants demonstrated a lack of knowledge about these products. Interestingly, several respondents knew of organic clothing only in terms of simple items, such as T–shirts, while others did not even know that organic or green apparel was an available option.

In addition, the respondents agreed that if there were more information about green apparel products available, they would be more prone to buy them. They felt skeptical about current eco–claims because labeling of green apparel is voluntary and no general rules have been implemented for apparel product labeling. They added that current labels on green clothing did not offer an adequate amount of information to consumers. They were unsure of exactly what “environmentally friendly” meant and how the products they had seen were environmentally friendly. Additionally, most of the participants agreed that a well–established eco–label for apparel products would increase consumers’ knowledge of environmental impacts from apparel production and foster consumers’ green apparel purchasing behaviors.

Regarding willingness to buy green apparel products, they mentioned that they would be more likely to purchase green apparel products if they were cheaper and more readily available. Respondents indicated that they would not buy a less attractive environmentally friendly garment with the label attached to it over a more attractive conventional product. Therefore, before emphasizing green aspects, products should meet the quality expectations of consumers.

Based on these two investigations, the research team suggested that a labeling system could be used to reduce the information gap between producers and consumers. Green labels for textile and apparel products can facilitate choices for consumers making environmentally responsible purchasing decisions by motivating and/or educating them (D’Souza, et al., 2006).

As mentioned earlier, just as the nutritional facts and ingredients are listed on food packages, the apparel label can include customized information on how the content of a specific product and its production processes impact the environment. Our research team identified six sustainability aspects of apparel products as the key information that would be beneficial for consumers to know from the green apparel label: organic, biodegradable, safely dyed, fair trade, carbon footprint, and recycled. Creating eye–catching symbols accompanied by brief explanations for clarification, which convey the key aspects of sustainability within the apparel industry, will be necessary. This design will make the labels easy to read and serve as a convenient reference for consumers.

If the standardized and easy–to–read label is commonly used in the textile and apparel industry in the future, it will educate consumers about green products and their effects on our surrounding environment. By becoming more knowledgeable about green products, consumers will be able to make more informed purchases of environmentally responsible products. In addition, educated consumers will drive businesses to practice more sustainability. Adopting the easy–to–read, informative green label will help retailers promote their eco–friendly strategies. As people continue to show interest in green products through purchases, the availability of various green products will increase, resulting in growing diversity in the retailing industry.

This educational research brief is from the University of Delaware (Fiber Online Journal).
Creating a Green Label for Reducing the Gap

Authors:
Dr. Hae Jin Gam is an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at Illinois State University. She was a fashion designer in South Korea until 2001. Her doctoral research was in the area of sustainable apparel design and production development and was funded by the Environmental Protection Agency. Her current research interests include sustainability in the apparel and textile industry, apparel product development, consumers’ eco–friendly purchasing behavior, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.

Dr. Yoon Jin Ma is an assistant professor in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences at Illinois State University. Her research interests include social responsibility in apparel consumption, manufacturing, and retailing; consumer behavior; services marketing; and scale development. She received the Student Best Paper Award at the doctoral level from the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) in 2008, the Best Track Paper Award in the textile and apparel/international track from ITAA in 2009, and the Paper of Distinction Award in the consumer behavior track from ITAA in 2010

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Top 5 Tips for Writing a Killer Business Plan | Niche Volumes

Starting a business plan is a detailed process that is both educational and revealing. with existing companies it is a chance to re-evaluate profit margins and focus on the prominent areas of the business while cutting out the departments that are losing money. For business plans for new companies it is an opportunity to really focus on, and understand the industry and evaluate whether your next big idea will be successful before you make a large investment.
Although up to 44% of new businesses survive 4 years or more the success of any new business is good planning, access to capital and good business management.
Here are the 5 best tips for creating a killer business plan that will undoubtedly impress:


1) consider your Audience
Business plans are developed for many different reasons. Is it for presenting to a panel for project approval? will it be to submit for funding? Is it simply to restructure the business for profitability? Each of these avenues will require adjustments to the plan format and style you will need to use throughout the document. If you are attempting to obtain funding then you will have to have very detailed cost and ROI projections that are measurable and realistic. If you are making a presentation to a non-profit or a board of directors it is likely that you will need to include a directive on community impact or involvement and impact (either positive or negative) to the existing business. Remember your audience as you creates your document to ensure you focus on the important topics and leave no questions unanswered.


2) Quality Reference Material Is Key
It is important to integrate a diverse mix of reference material in your plan document. the web is great for the latest news but is not nearly as highly regarded as printed documents. be sure to use a good mix of reputable internet reference along with well-known facts and industry statistics most often found in printed literature. Industry specific publications and industry magazines are an excellent way to get the latest news and trends in a reliable place. Always include references from industry publications as well to raise the standard your business plan and build credibility in your due diligence. Always make sure to cite your research or any quotes you may use. this will also build credibility while ensuring you are not infringing on any protected or copyrighted content you use. To quickly and easily cite your sources there is a web-based tool that you can use to enter in your info and get back the properly formatted entry for the works cited page. it makes the process a breeze: easybib.com.


3) Do your Own Research
Creating a solid business plan is the singular first step in knowing your industry and understanding what it will take to be successful in your chosen field. Part of developing a plan should be to evaluate competitors, define your business strategy and start to understand if your value proposition meets a tangible need in the marketplace. Walking through the initial steps of creating a business plan is an invaluable process that will help to ensure that your business can survive the market trends. Don’t pay someone else to do your research for you or it may end up costing you more than you think.

4) using a Business plan Template
Now that you have various notes and articles, market information and loads of statistics it is time to put it all together in a layout that will highlight the data you have compiled. Finding  business plan examples can be a challenge as every business plan is different (see point #2 above), however you can develop your own based on a compilation of the different topics or areas you want to cover. If you want a business plan template that comes formatted with sample headings and the different categories already setup, try using the plan layout from online websites. this site has a real business plan in Word format for quickly changing out headings and information. In addition the plan comes with a break-even analysis template in Excel as well as a 1 year Pro-Forma template in Excel with the formulas already built for easily updating and projecting costs for your business. this is a big time saver and an easy way to quickly get the business plan document underway without having to start from scratch.


5) Seek Out Experts in the Industry
Finally, after you have organized your information reach out to some industry experts like local college professors, trade show organizers, or even your local Chamber of Commerce for some insight and feedback on your plan. it always helps to get a second opinion on the plan before making the final presentation. having one or more individuals look over the plan will shed light on areas that need to be revised or reinforce that the business plan is ready to present.
Don’t get distracted spending valuable time figuring out the Works Cited, Table of Contents or overall plan layout. use the templates or resources that are readily available to you and spend the time focusing where you should, on the reporting and presentation of your business idea.

Source: Onlinebusinessplans1.net

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ETAM Spring / Summer 2011 by Natalia Vodianova


Jasnuary in Paris, supermodel Natalia Vodianova presented her second collection for French lingerie line Etam at the Grand Palais, with a VIP guest list including Kate Moss, Alexa Chung, Eva Herzigova, Micky GreenMario Testino, and performance by Beth Dito & The Kills. Here is the look book images (& video).

 

Natalia Vodianova signed a three-year deal back in 2009 to design the ‘Natalia pour Etam‘ lingerie, swimwear and clothing collections for the French brand, as well as fronting the campaigns

BONUS:
Behind the scene of Etam Lookbook

BONUS #2

A glimpse of last night Runway video

Source: Trendland.com By Cyril Style

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Dressing with Sense and Simplicity: Organic Fabric and Clothing

No one would like to eat a bowl of pesticides drenched food. Then why wear clothing doused in chemicals?

Centuries before people use to live in harmony with nature and believed in giving even better environment for their coming generations. Now, people have crossed all limits dominated by the voracity of luxuries, benefits and money. This is taking a serious toll on the environment, and on the lives of all living beings in the planet.

The ‘Chemical Cocktail’ of Clothing:

When considering a healthy lifestyle, fabric is the first thing that comes to mind. Synthetic fabrics’ teeming with chemicals and dyes pose severe health threats. Synthetic fibers makes the skin uncomfortable due to the presence of toxins in them. From towels to bed linens, and clothes they are all-pervading in our everyday life. Apart from the potential health hazards to humans, these synthetic fibers also leach into the environment causing serious damages to soil, air, ground water, and other living beings around us.

The Environment Shield Organization of US has declared that seven out of the top fifteen pesticides are used for growing conventional cotton, and are regarded as the most environment polluting pesticides. On the contrary, organic cotton is cultivated using untreated GMO seeds, and by adopting biological based growing practices. A beneficial habitat planting method is adopted which prevents pests, thereby eliminating the usage of toxic chemicals.

stewartbrown 02 Room101 | Organic Fashion Design Pioneer Howard Brown

Natural Dyes Vs Synthetic Dyes:

Synthetic dyes involve many carcinogenic chemicals and effluents that are discharged into the river or atmosphere causing pollution. Chemicals used on fabrics can contain allergens, carcinogens and mutagens. Dyes that are used for special effects on textiles such as flame retardant, stain resistant etc., are likely to create health problems. Natural dyes are obtained from renewable sources, and are good to skin. They are bio-degradable and eco-friendly. Natural dyes are enriched with medicinal and curative properties, and impart healing qualities to the wearer of the fabric dyed with them. They save energy as they are not made from petroleum products. Furthermore, they provide rural employment, and also preserve traditional craftsmanship.

Life with natural fibers’:

Acrylic, polyester, nylon, rayon, triacetate, acetate and other fabrics labeled as stain & wrinkle resistant, and moth repellent will have ample amount of chemicals in their making. These fabrics can be avoided, and replaced with natural fabrics like wool, silk, cotton, linen, cashmere, and hemp. Organic and herbal clothing is more preferable for people who are very sensitive to chemicals. Researches on people with multiple chemical sensitivities reveal that organic clothing is essential in reducing their exposure to toxic chemicals.

 

Source: fibre2fashion.com

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12 Must-Know Menswear Designers Behind Luxury Labels

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A round-up of 12 must-know designers behind luxury menswear, including Véronique Nichanian for Hermès, Italo Zucchelli for Calvin Klein & Martyn Bal for Versace.

With all the constant publicity surrounding designers of luxury womenswear, one could be forgiven for assuming Alber Elbaz, Marc Jacobs and John Galliano are the be-all and end-all of LanvinLouis Vuitton and Dior respectively. Whilst they give consumers a tangible face and voice to a brand, it is often the case that there is an alternate independent talent behind the men that grace the runways of Paris, Milan, London and New York.

Although some menswear designers do make the headlines, Thom Browne for Moncler Gamme Bleu, Kris Van Assche for Dior Homme and Raf Simons for Jil Sander, many other creators of influential and popular luxury menswear brands have yet to seep into the consumers’ consciousness. We investigated the menswear designers behind the recent Autumn Winter 2011 collections and present a roster of names you need to know.

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Lucas Ossendrijver, Lanvin

Netherlands native, Lucas Ossendrijver, has been the man behind Lanvin’s menswear collections since 2005. After graduating from Holland’s Fashion Institute Arnhem he went straight to work at Kenzo, then onto Kostas Murkudis. In 2001 he joined Dior Homme under the direction of Hedi Slimane, eventually being selected by Alber Ebaz four years later to head up Menswear at Lanvin.

“When I was a student I once found a hand-stitched men’s jacket at a flea market. I unpicked the lining to look inside, and I was amazed to find a panoply of hidden trims, reinforcements and ribbons. I didn’t understand it, but that’s what drew me to men’s fashion. The construction of men’s clothing is concealed, but it is very precise. That’s what attracted me.”

Website: Lanvin
Quote: Portrait Lucas Ossendrijver

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Véronique Nichanian, Hermès

In a world of male designers dressing women, Véronique Nichanian is one of the few females designing for men. Whilst the famed French heritage brand might be more commonly associated with Martin Margiela, John Paul Gaultier or more recently, Christophe Lemaire, Nichanian has been with Hermès for over twenty years, joining in 1988. The designer graduated from the Ecole de la Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne, followed by a period working for Cerruti before joining Hermès. Her very first collection for Hermes won her the City of Paris Grand Prix of Creative Art prize.

“I am lucky to have been able to use the most exceptional materials for Hermes, it is essential for me to work with the know-how of traditional craftsmanship, combined with the latest technological advances.”

Website: Hermès
Quote: Pursuitist

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Alessandro Sartori, Z Zegna

Italian Alessandro Sartori originally studied textile engineering in his hometown Biella, Northern Italy, before going on to study Fashion in Milan. He has been with the Zegna group since 1993, originally as the design director of the Linea Soft line. When the Z Zegna brand was created in 2003, to target a younger, more modern consumer, Sartori was appointed creative director, where he remains today.

“Fashion changes while style remains; this is the backbone of how I live my professional and personal life. It’s important to always be modern, and stand out and to evolve but superficial and ephemeral trends should never be followed. It’s most important that a man always feels comfortable in what he is wearing; Clothes should be worn, and not the other way around”.

Website: Z Zegna
Quote: Fashion We Like

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Graeme Fidler and Michael Herz, Bally

The pair originally met in 2003 while working at Aquascutum where Herz was head of womenswear since and Fidler head of menswear. Previously Herz worked in New York for Ralph Lauren, helping establish the RLX line, Fidler worked with Marc Jacobs at Iceberg and eventually in Paris at Guy Laroche, working under the direction of Alber Elbaz. They moved across to Bally following the departure of Brian Atwood, to re-invigorate the ready-to-wear business started in the late 1970’s.

“We largely see ourselves as editors whose job is to challenge each other’s ideas and design concepts. Our aim is to create a different mood for Bally by unifying and evolving the brand with contemporary, relevant collections. What we love about fashion design is the opportunity to continually break rules, to create and reinvent, over and over.”

Website: Bally
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Kean Etro, Etro

Originally beginning as a textile house in 1968, the focus on Etro has always been superb fabrics in intricate prints. The family owned and run business is designed by sister and brother team Veronica and Kean Etro, where Kean heads up the menswear collection. After finishing his studies in 1990, Kean joined the family business, supervising the launch of the Etro perfume line and eventually becoming the manager of the men’s fashion collection, where he has remained since.

“It’s very important if you can relate to what you wear, to me, creativity is not just making a collection. You have to invent something every time.”

Website: Etro
Quote: Digital Journal

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Martyn Bal, Versace

Immediately after completing his MA at London’s Royal College of Art in 2000, Martyn Bal was instantly recruited to assist Hedi Slimane at Dior Homme. He followed his tenure at Dior with stints as creative director and design consultant at Verri Uomo and Versace respectively before being hired by Burberry as menswear design director of the Prorsum label. He has now returned to Versace, as head of Menswear and continues to manage his own line, Martyn Bal.

“I intend to have a graphic and constructivists approach to my design, but always want to inject enough energy through movement and fluidity to give it the softness and emotion it needs for it to become pure, poetic and believable.”

Website: Versace
Quote: Dazed Digital

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Milan Vukmirovic, Trussardi 1911

To say that Milan Vukmirovic is a man of many talents is an understatement. Not only is he the Creative Director of Trussardi 1911, but he is also the director of magazines L’Officiel Homme and L’Officiel Homme Italia. Further to these roles he is an accomplished photographer who has shot campaigns for Armani, Hugo Boss, Lacoste and Trussardi, he was a co-founder of Colette concept store in Paris and recently co-founded The Webster in Miami, a retail project focused on fusing fashion, photography and design.

“Everyone knows everything about a product right away, they know the marketing and they know how it works. So I think at the moment, the important thing is for something to have a soul—a real emotion. If you make something personal, that’s what makes the difference. You have to make people feel things. That’s what I do in my work.”

Website: Trussardi
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Paul Helbers, Louis Vuitton

Whilst creative director Marc Jacobs has become synonymous with Louis Vuitton’sready-to-wear collections, it is Paul Helbers who is the director and designer of the men’s studio. Helbers studied fashion at the Rietveld academy in Amsterdam before moving to London to do graduate work at the Royal College of Art. Upon returning to Holland he worked for mass-market chain Mac & Maggie, quickly branching off to start his own label Inch and consulting for men’s-wear companies. He eventually landed a post at Maison Martin Margiela, where he stayed for almost five years as the men’s studio director, before moving to Louis Vuitton in 2005.

“Men are not like women, who will buy a great-looking shoe even if it kills them, Men are extreme creatures of comfort, so quality and fit are absolutely essential. As soon as a man feels restricted in a jacket, you lose him as a client.”

Website: Louis Vuitton
Quote: The New York Times

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Italo Zucchelli, Calvin Klein

Italian designer, Italo Zucchelli, graduated from the Polimoda school of fashion design in Florence, eventually working at Jil Sander and as a designer for Romeo Gigli. In 2000 he moved to Calvin Klein, where he had originally planned to leave only one year in. Calvin Klein himself took him aside and asked him to stay: “He told me that he really liked what I was doing and that he wanted me to go on doing it.” In 2004 he was tapped to direct and design the menswear offering.

“The rules of the game in general are going to change for everything, not just menswear. People want to have fun with clothes. We sold out of the mirror suits in New York, and the black suits were still there. It tells me that men are looking for something that makes them feel good, makes them have fun, and makes them stand out. And it’s all different sorts of men.”

Website: Calvin Klein
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Massimiliano Giornetti, Salvatore Ferragamo

He began his career at Ferragamo as an assistant men’s knitwear designer, ten years later he is the creative director of all the Salvatore Ferragamo collections. He studied Foreign Languages and Literature at the University of Florence, before turning his hand to fashion at the Polimoda Institute of Fashion Design and Marketing.

‘‘I don’t believe in fashion as provocation. I’m not interested in the ‘wow’ effect, I’m more concerned with beauty and decoration. Fashion is not a primary necessity in life. The point of fashion is to make your daily life more special.’’

Website: Salvatore Ferragamo
Quote: The New York Times

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Tommaso Aquilano and Roberto Rimondi , Gianfranco Ferré

Roman Tommaso Aquilano and Bolognese Roberto Rimondi, originally met in 1988 whilst working as designers at Max Mara. In 2005 they won first prize at Italian Vogue’s Who’s On Next contest open to young talents and formed their 6267 label shortly after. In 2007 they became creative directors of Italian cashmere brand Malo, then owned by IT Holding SpA that also controlled Gianfranco Ferré. When Lars Nilsson’s resigned in early 2008, the duo were tapped to design in the womenswear, they are now responsible for the creative direction of the whole business.

“The fashion system is also a bit forced, it uses this idea of the “young designer” to look for something else. But you can have a designer who might be 80 years old but who does things that are different. It’s the search for what is different more than for what is “young.”

Website: Gianfranco Ferré
Quote: Interview Magazine

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Paolo Gerani, Iceberg

Originally his parents business, merely one year older than him, Gilmar S.p.A. was created to produce and distribute clothing under the Iceberg and Gerani brands. Paolo originally studied business marketing at Los Angeles University followed by an economics and commerce degree course at Urbino University. He joined the family business and was immediately drawn to the design side, particularly the study and research of trends, fabrics and colours. He devoted his time to advertising and corporate communication, before eventually becoming vice-chairman and creative director.

“I want to respect the knitwear heritage of the brand, which is what we historically produce. Knitwear is our fabric.”

Website: Iceberg
Quote: Dazed Digital

Source: Luxurysociety.com by Sophie Doran

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Spring/Summer 2011 Updo Hair Trends

Spring/Summer 2011 Updo Trends

There is nothing sexier and more elegant than a simple updo that adds interest to your neckline and brings a glamorous, yet effortless vibe to any appearance. From different versions of the famous ballerina bun to extremely severe, slicked chignons and high top knots, updos will be one of the hottest hairstyles for spring/summer 2011.

Spring/summer 2011 comes with a wide palette of beautiful, feminine hairstyles. Among all these, there is one timeless trend exuding maximum femininity and sophistication: the updo. Seen in a myriad of different versions suitable for numerous occasions, an updo is universally flattering and works amazing on long and medium-lengthR hair.

Versatile and practical, an updo will always add a special vibe to your looks, whether you choose a simple bun, a messy, festival-chic one, a polished chignon, or, a sophisticated knot with a retro appeal.

Diane Von Furstenberg                                     Jil Sander
The ballerina bun was one of the hairstyles chosen by many designers for spring/summer 2011. Its elegance and simplicity makes it one of the best options when it comes to finding the perfect hairstyle for a casual, daytime outfit, or for a more special event that requires a more chic appearance.
Classic and tidy at Nina Ricci and Jil Sander or rather messy, yet attentively studied at Diane von Furstenberg, there are various versions where to choose from. It is very practical and it can be done in an instant. You just have to make a ponytail and wrap the hair around the elastic band, then secure the bun.
Hervé Léger by Max Azria                                Nina Ricci
Summer is all about flirty and playful, just-got-out-of-bed looks with breezy, romantic dresses and appropriate hairstyles. You can enjoy this amazing season to the fullest going for effortless, yet feminine, adorable hairstyles such as a romantic chignon as spotted at Proenza Schouler and Dsquared². Moreover, if you want to add a glamorous feeling, yet preserve a sweet look, you can draw your inspiration from the Dolce & Gabbana or Nina Ricci runway shows where the chignon reveals sophistication through a simple approach, perfect for a candid and luminous character. This is a simple and chic updo with minimal styling required. 


Dolce & Gabbana                                                        Proenza Schouler

Dsquared²                                                                      Nina Ricci
As we have seen, there are timeless hairstyles that never go out of fashion and keep reinventing themselves season after season. Well, this is the case of the elegant chignon that never seems to fail due to its numerous versions and ladylike luxurious aspect. This is why it can be said that this type of updo is among the most popular choices when it comes to chic hairstyles. 

For spring/summer 2011, a refined, office-appropriate approach of the chignon was spotted at Chloé, with hair worn at the nape of the neck, and Gucci, in a slicked way with a total wet effect. However, a more elegant and extremely polished updo that you can rock at a special event is the one seen at Oscar de la Renta and the French twist from Zac Posen.

Chloé                                                                                   Gucci

Oscar de la Renta                                                     Zac Posen
The newest hairstyle trends for spring/summer 2011 will feature adorable and unique shapes and styles. Creative knots oozing self-confidence and relaxation, yet glamour and style will be some of the hottest hairstyle trends for the warm season. Looking just like twisted sculptures, the updos seen at Gucci and Viktor & Rolf are effective without creating the illusion of trying too hard. 

There is nothing more comfortable and sweet than wearing your hair up during hot summer days when the heat might get quite unbearable. In this circumstances, a high top knot can easily do the trick without too much effort. This hairstyle screams spontaneity and laid-back style and it works great even on curly hair. Draw your inspiration from Z Spoke by Zac Posen and Moschino. Add a headband or a scarf for a unique look.


Gucci                                                                                   Viktor & Rolf

Z Spoke by Zac Posen                                                  Moschino
Photos via elle.com

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